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OT: Opinion on electric impact wrench?

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  • OT: Opinion on electric impact wrench?

    Guys I got this new travel trailer with duals and a F350 pickup to travel with. My shoulders aren't what they used to be and I can easily tear them up on a tire spanner wrench trying to loosen lug nuts. (Impinged rotator cuff)

    Reading the specs on the DeWalt 1/2 drive impact wrench says 120V 7amps and 340 ft pounds.

    A Chicago Electric version says 120V 7amps and 240 ft pounds.

    There is a dramatic difference in cost but I'm wondering if the Chicago Electric version will work for my particular needs. I hope I never have to use it but don't want to be stuck somewhere out on the plains with no help trying to change a tire with compromised shoulders. For about $60 bucks I can eliminate one more serious worry as the trailer has a gas generator.

    Any opinions? I know specs are over inflated all the time but would the Chicago unit likely work?
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

  • #2
    I have a nabor that got one of the HF ones,Been a year and still working good.He is in bad health thats the reason he got it to change flats.....

    Comment


    • #3
      I recently bought a Canadian Tire "Mastercraft" impact driver for $50 (on sale). It quoted 225 ftlbs of torque. It looks similar to the Chicago Electric unit.

      Recently changed out my winter tires on rims (installed by the dealer) and the unit could not undo the lug nuts. It could be that the voltage at the outlet in the garage is low but I'm not impressed with the unit. Perhaps I need to wire up my variac to give 140v and then it may have some oomph.

      My take is that once you buy the higher rated driver you will not remember the price, only that it works - especially when on the road and perhaps in less than ideal conditions.

      Geoff

      Comment


      • #4
        Not a good test trying it to undo nuts put on with an impact gun.
        They are not set up to any kind of torque and are usually used until the fitter thinks he has heard enough bangs!!
        I have heard of horror stories where bolts have been sheared using the guns!!
        Anyway you should not overtighten the nuts anyway - 36foot pounds should be enough!
        Peter
        I have tools I don't know how to use!!

        Comment


        • #5
          I swear by my dewalt, and so does a NEIGHBOR who has a Motor Home with Duals.

          Comment


          • #6
            Dunno if this will help, YOD, but I sorta remember a 4WD article from years back.

            It was along the lines of building a "calibrated" wheel brace.
            The calibration came in by knowing your body weight.

            Basic idea was, a long (ish) flat bar, notched at intervals and a 1/2" square bar welded on the end to drive a socket.

            A stirrup was fabricated to sit in the relevant notch on the bar.
            Knowing your weight and the length of the lever, you can calculate torque, and keep it within safe limits.

            Safe torque limits and a lot safer to use your foot than your shoulder.

            I've also done some serious damage to the rotator cuff.

            DAMN, it hurts!
            Just got my head together
            now my body's falling apart

            Comment


            • #7
              I'd think one of those 4-way lug wrenches and a piece of cheater pipe to step on with your foot would apply all the torque you'd need... save money and avoid any dependence on any power source. i.e. K-I-S-S

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lynnl
                I'd think one of those 4-way lug wrenches and a piece of cheater pipe to step on with your foot would apply all the torque you'd need... save money and avoid any dependence on any power source. i.e. K-I-S-S
                Exactly-the cheater pipe is one of the great inventions of whatever century it was invented in...one of the basic tools of the trucking industry.

                Comment


                • #9
                  AH HAH! AIN'T ANYONE WORKING TODAY? This post has been hanging 20 minutes and it's got 7 responses !!!

                  Thanks guys. I guess maybe I'll go with the breaker bar and the second and third stage cheater bars. I'll need a 6" extension and something to hold the extension level with the nut while I jump up and down on the cheaters !! I've never had a problem getting the nuts on, only overtightened rusty nuts off. My air unit pops them off with no problem but I don't have an big air compressor on the road with me

                  NOW SOMEBODY GO BACK TO WORK !
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Get the Dewalt. I'm on vacation this week.
                    "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

                    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

                    "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's non of yer Biz ness why I am home. Never ask again.




                      Actually I am choping up the last guy that asked.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think the torque rating is actually the point at which the plastic handle breaks off, DAMHIKT.
                        Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Actually I am choping up the last guy that asked.
                          Oh Boy
                          "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

                          "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

                          "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have 2 older Harley Sportster type bikes. I know I was the 1st one to pull the trans on one of them.The clutch hub nut is supposed to be factory torked at 240 ft lbs on assembly. Removing it without all the special H-D tools was going to present a real challenge. My buddy had an Ingersol-Rand electric impact and it spun that nut off without a hiccup. I couldn't afford a genuine I-R so I bought a Craftsman that was visually identical and cost much less. I have been very happy with it for quit a few years now. My old bikes get ridden hard and need lots of attention. It also did a couple virgin clutch nuts on other Sporties too so I know it's got the muscle.
                            Illigitimi non Carborundum
                            9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade. Now I boil oil

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              36 ft/lbs? My GMS 1998 suburban owners manual specifies 150 ft/lbs. The tire store says BS and only torques them to 100 ft/lbs. Old Volkswagon was 105 ft/lbs. Maybe i need the get the SAE specs and see what the values really should be.
                              John Burchett
                              in Byng OK
                              John Burchett
                              in Byng OK

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