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"An Improved Drawbar for an RF30 Mill-Drill" update

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  • "An Improved Drawbar for an RF30 Mill-Drill" update

    One thing I learned after it was too late to change the article relates to the securing of the top nut. I specify using an 1/8" diameter rod of CRS. It does not take that much force to shear it off.

    An 1/8" diameter roll pin is better. If that is not enough strength, cut off the end of the bar so it was solid. Then I plug welded the nut in placeI it wasn't for me when I was using collets to hold my large end mills

    Since I started using end mill holders, I do not need to tighten the draw bar nearly as much.

    I did have one machinist suggest that I use drill rod for the draw bar rather than CRS. The CRS seems to be holding up well so I have not make the change.

    R. G. Sparber (Rick)
    Rick Sparber

    [email protected]
    web site: rick.sparber.org

  • #2
    Drill rod is carbon steel, not necessarily any better for that
    use than CRS. I tried some for a 10mm cantilevered axle
    on a recumbent, threaded 10x1 and it cracked off clean after
    800miles, (about 60-70 hrs service) at the last thread
    and point of max lateral stress. Replacement made of 4140
    has lasted 5000mi so far. Drill rod is designed to be hardenable
    for making impromptu tools.
    Steve

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome!

      I was reading your write up in HSM, and it looks pretty good. Hopefully you can hang around here and share some of that "newfound wisdom...recorded in a small notebook" that you allude to.

      Like most articles in the magazines, I'll use it as a starting point, so that I can make my own version (I don't own a RF 30). That way I can make my own mistakes, and you won't get the blame.
      Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

      Comment


      • #4
        Steve,

        First hand experience wins out over speculation. It sounds like drill rod is not a good choice for the drill rod.

        Thanks,

        Rick
        Rick Sparber

        [email protected]
        web site: rick.sparber.org

        Comment


        • #5
          Techshop,

          I never thought of publishing my list of lessons learned. Interesting...

          I realize this is the HSM bulletin board and I really like HSM and DO support them, but you may want to look at rick.sparber.org for some articles that I did not submit.

          Rick
          Rick Sparber

          [email protected]
          web site: rick.sparber.org

          Comment


          • #6
            Rick,

            I follow bout everything you post over on the yahoo mill-drill site and feel sure you would be welcomed heartily over here with your observations/findings. If you follow this forum at all, you should see that the type stuff you get into, most of these guys would really enjoy.

            To the HSM bunch..... Rick is very prolific in experimenting/tinkering/building all sorts of ..... things? Just the kind of stuff we seem to like so well.
            If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

            Comment


            • #7
              Just remember .A good machinist cant have too many ideas. We learn something new every day ,are we had better.
              Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
              http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
              http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, I did want your first post here to get lost...

                When I read the VP, and some of those overseas magazines, I don't always connect the "real" print world with the "unreal" online world. But recently, the two are starting to connect in this worn out mind of mine.

                I added you site to my favorites, but I won't have a chance to look around there for a few days; next time I do Yahoo, I'll check that out, but overthere (Yahoo) I mostly look at the pictures, because too many places have gone untended, and the garden has gotten overgrown.

                Somewhat, OT here, but I like this site, because it is not quite like the other machining sites. I really don't need someone telling me the solution to my "problem" is spending $$$$ on this or that. If I had $$$$, I wouldn't be trying to do it my HSM way...
                Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bill,

                  Thanks for the kind words and making me feel at home.

                  Rick
                  Rick Sparber

                  [email protected]
                  web site: rick.sparber.org

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice to have you aboard Rick, hope you enjoy yourself here. As a rookie machinist I enjoyed your web site and ability to make your explanations understandable. I've marked your site as a place to frequent! I hope you are not too thin skinned, some of these guys have some fine minds but don't eat near enough greens!!

                    So you aren't confused by some of the topics let me add that some of us view this not so much as a machinist forum but more like a table at the local McDonalds restaurant where a lot of machinist hangout every morning for coffee and stimulating conversation
                    Last edited by Your Old Dog; 04-18-2007, 07:52 AM.
                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dear "...Dog",

                      Thanks for the heads up. I have been on many metal working sites that have people who are not timid about speaking their minds. When I want to get a good view of a topic, I climb up high and post my position. It is sort of like waving a metal rod while sitting on top of a roof during a lightning storm. I almost always learn a lot, do get zapped, but the wounds do heal. No regrets.

                      Rick
                      Rick Sparber

                      [email protected]
                      web site: rick.sparber.org

                      Comment

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