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Got rid of the stump...

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  • Got rid of the stump...

    Few months ago, I aquired a small collection of blacksmithing hardware, among them a 140-pound Peter Wright anvil that's seen far better days. It came unceremoniously nailed to a large but crookedly-cut and much too short chunk of local Spruce. Nailed- as in large nails driven partway in, and then bent over the feet, sorta-kinda.

    Well, besides it being too short, too soft, and too crooked, it made moving the anvil all that much harder. It wasn't secured well enough to move it all with a hand cart, and added just that much more weight and bulk when trying to carry it by hand.

    Time, work and prior projects have kept me away from it for a while, but today was such perfect weather to work outside, I told everyone to get stuffed and pencilled in a bit of "me time"- the first since, oh, Thanksgiving, I should think.

    Six hours later, I had this:



    It's slightly higher than the recommended "closed knuckle" height, and the anvil is "padded" with a fitted piece of 1/2" plywood in it's socket, to somewhat dampen the ring.

    Rather than making a simple box form, I "cut out" the space between the feet, so I could add in a cross bar to hang tongs, hammers and other bits therein. (The twisty pieces were leftovers from an old project I fiddled with the last time I had access to a forge and an anvil- right about 20 years ago now...) Last, there's four pair of pins to hang a few hammers right close at hand.

    Depending on how it works out, I may install some bolted straps to tie the anvil to the stand (over the feet) amd I'm thinking of adding another crossbar below the lower shelf. That way I can just slide a handtruck under it, and roll it away as a unit.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  • #2
    Fantastic!

    Looks great,I love it when a plan comes together!

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    • #3
      I like it.
      Heres mine- I call it the "urban stump".
      2x4's, bundled together, held by the tension of the bolts- theoretically, I could take it apart some day and frame a very short wall with it.
      But I need to add some hammer holders at the very least.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Doc Nickel
        the anvil is "padded" with a fitted piece of ½" plywood in it's socket, to somewhat dampen the ring.

        .
        Dampen the ring? Any good anvil will have a ring. A small piece of wood is not gonna dampen it at all. A well supported anvil will have a very nice ring to it. The shock of a sledge wont even be transmitted downward to the wood pad.

        You do have a very nice anvil there.

        Not to steal the thread but... Hitting a hardened tipped hammer to the hard anvil? Will it destroy the hammer face? Not that you would do it purposely, but a miss hit maybe..

        I have always been weary of striking the hammer face accidentally on the anvil fearing of shattering the face of the (expensive) hammer.

        Anyone have a chunk of hammer face blow off at lighting speed knockin the two together?

        Mythbusters have done some shows plastering two tips of hammers together. The hammer shanks have been bent severally without an explosion of hard metal flyin about....JRouche
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #5
          I have struck a hardened shaft with an engineers hammer. First sliver just went through tee shirt. I thought -no problem-never happen again. Next wack sent another sliver about 1/8" long into belly flush with surface, had a tiny hook on the end so it was hard to get out. Wasn't like I was not warned........
          mark costello-Low speed steel

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm not the author, a guy on metalmeet, but this is a great subject on SHAPING metal with a stump cut out.. or depression forming sheet. Model T fenders and art..
            http://bbssystem.com/viewtopic.php?t=1450

            I kinda like a heavy stump under a anvil.. them anvils are pricy here and I ended up with a six foot piece of railroad track on "my welded legs"...

            You do what you have to to get by.. a tinners stand, a 2x2 socket with hammer holders around it is a great small forming tool.. A farmers disc harrow is a good base. I did two with motorcycle fender holders on them to paint the bike this week. BUT, my benders, small anvil, football anvil from HF all go into it now.

            Someday, I might get all the tools I want.. till then I just get by. I'm out of room again. barely got the bike into the shop past the other projects.
            Excuse me, I farted.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JRouche
              Dampen the ring? Any good anvil will have a ring. A small piece of wood is not gonna dampen it at all. A well supported anvil will have a very nice ring to it. The shock of a sledge wont even be transmitted downward to the wood pad.
              -"Dampen" not "eliminate". And it's more for noise consideration than anything. Force and vibration transmitted to the stand can make it, too, ring or vibrate, and a bit of wood helps damp that.

              I've already used the anvil a couple of times, on the old log, and din't find the 'ring' annoying... at the time. But that was only a few minutes at a time, if I want to spend a day building a large project, a little bit less noise will likely be welcomed.

              You do have a very nice anvil there.
              -It has seen it's better days. It's a pre-1910 Peter Wright, wrought body with a hard steel face forge-welded on. One of the more popular older anvils, and among the most numerous, as PW imported tens or even hundreds of thousands back in the days.

              I'm still contemplating using some Stoddy hardfacing rod to rebuild the corners, as they're badly chipped, worn and rounded. There's no even somewhat sharp edge left anywhere on the face. I may hold off on that, and just mill or grind the top flat first, and use it that way for a while.

              Not to steal the thread but... Hitting a hardened tipped hammer to the hard anvil? Will it destroy the hammer face? Not that you would do it purposely, but a miss hit maybe..
              -Well, the corners of this one are badly chipped and rounded, and the top is badly pitted. Probably partly because of ham-fited types beating on cold metal, but I'm sure also because of a few misses.

              On the other hand, the only chipped or cracked hammer faces I've ever seen, were on some cheap import ball-peens, that were probably not much better than grey cast iron in reality.

              I have picked up a few surplus hammers with a small corner chip or two (I fix 'em by TIGging the chip up with a piece of music wire or a section of straightened-out spring as filler) but I never really can tell why they chipped.

              Mythbusters have done some shows plastering two tips of hammers together. The hammer shanks have been bent severally without an explosion of hard metal flyin about.
              -I suspect the chipping was more of a problem years ago when heat-treatment wasn't as refined and repeatable as it is today. I'd imagine it was fairly common to get an overhardened hammer face, which could or would shatter when struck by something equally hard.

              But with better metallurgy and more sophisticated heat treatment today, we can make a hammer that's tougher than it is hard, and thus much more resistant to chipping and cracking.

              That's all just a guess, though.

              Doc.
              Last edited by Doc Nickel; 05-13-2007, 12:22 AM.
              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

              Comment


              • #8
                Many years ago as boy of about 6 i am 59 now you do the math, i was trying to spit some boards 1 by 4's I was using a hatchet the type with an hammer head and using a hammer to drive the hatchet thru the wood to split it. I felt something warm going down my side , i looked and it was blood a piece of steel had come off and lodged in my upper left shoulder below the skin i had no idea what had happend,, we had trip to ER to remove it , so i know it was possible.
                These tools were not of the quality we have today. Lookin back i remember seeing chips from the faces of some older hammers. I never ever struck 2 hammers together after that. :
                scariest thing to hear " I am from the government and i am here to help"

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