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  • No hammer drill? No problem.

    I put in some anchors in the concrete floor today and needed a reasonable way to drive the 5/8" masonry drill bit. An ordinary electric hand drill is too light for that size and duty and I don't have a hammer drill. I didn't feel like buying or renting one either so I came up with a solution that worked quite well. Not as fast as a hammer drill but definitely up to the task.



    I welded a 1/2" UNF bolt into a 3/4" impact socket (I have a spare) and used it to mount a real Jacobs chuck. A little while later I have anchors installed for my bender. The shaper and drill press are next.

    I forgot to mention I used a grade 8 bolt and after welding buried the piece in sand for slow cooling to prevent over-hardening.
    Last edited by Evan; 05-12-2007, 10:28 PM.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    A real man (hairy chest, tiny hat band) would have used a single jack and a star drill.

    Way 2 go, Evan

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Forrest Addy
      A real man (hairy chest, tiny hat band) would have used a single jack and a star drill.

      Way 2 go, Evan
      I don't have a hairy chest but I have done quite a few anchors with a
      star drill and a 3lb engineers hammer. (now this was quite a while back)
      Now at 74 I do have a hammer drill. :-)
      ...lew...

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      • #4
        Ya Know, they have a chuck made for impact wrenches.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Forrest Addy
          A real man (hairy chest, tiny hat band) would have used a single jack and a star drill.
          You haven.t seen the concrete they used around here in the 1930s.

          The cement portion is a dull blackish-gray and is extremely hard. Then, embedded in it are pebbles of flint, jasper, and basalt as aggregate. I don't even know what they did to get the cement like that.

          The modern air entrained "concrete" with limestone aggregate is a pushover by comparison.

          I have busted a hammer drill on our concrete. Shook the commutator or armature (I forget now which) down the shaft and broke the connecting wires. Didn't get the hole deeper than 1/2" either.

          Those nails you are supposed to shoot or pound into concrete just bounce off it. A star drill gets rounded off in a couple dozen hits.

          The only thing that has ever gotten through it is a heavy Bosch hammer drill, the 50 lb type. And it wasnt quick about it.

          I was a little worried about having to buy the rental place a new bit, but they didn't look at it very closely. It appeared to be chipped and dulled compared to what it was when I started. That was after 5 1/2" holes.

          I'd like to know how to mix concrete to be like that.
          Last edited by J Tiers; 05-13-2007, 10:04 AM.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            Same stuff they make here. We have lots of basalt and other volcanic rock around here. Not far from here is a cliff with hexagonal basalt columns exposed. The pieces break off in nearly perfect hexagonal chunks.
            Last edited by Evan; 05-13-2007, 10:39 AM.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Sounds like the "bluemetal" agg here.
              Used to laugh at Omark guns and the like.
              Back when, as an apprentice, often had to get out the 2 man Bosch hammer drill (2 man, cos we were hanging cable tray overhead)
              Just got my head together
              now my body's falling apart

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              • #8
                The basalt is easier to drill than the flint and jasper.

                What do they do to get the cement like that? IT looks like a solid rock, not like modern concrete. No visible porosity, fractures more like obsidian, glass-like, not like breaking limestone.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  I have one of those Remington powder nail guns. I have to use the heaviest loads and even then it won't fire all the nails in properly. We don't have any limestone around here, all the aggregate is hard stuff from volcanic and metamorphic rocks. Some of the ones I drilled through yesterday were black material of some kind. For those I use a long single pointed chisel in my air hammer and break them up a bit in the hole.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Nice adapter, I'll have to remember that.

                    May I suggest not specifically mounting each of the benders and such? If you're like me, and have several special purpose tools that sit unused for months on end, a common mount is very handy. I know I've posted several times, but in my small shop, I have only one heavy floor mounted column for mounting all my tools (usually holds my large NE5 tube bender). It is made of receiver tube and all my benders, rollers, vises, etc. can be mounted there if I'm doing heavy stuff like bending 1.75 x 0.125 DOM. For smaller stuff, the same tools can be mounted to one of a dozen other receiver tubes as convenient (including one of 6 truck/trailer mounted receivers). My floor mounted receiver tube is mounted to a piece of 1/2 x 12 x 12 plate set in the floor with (4) 1/2" x 6" G8 bolts at the corners. Lots less work, less materials, and less restricting that a bunch of separate mounts that would only pay off if you use the stuff regularly.
                    Russ
                    Master Floor Sweeper

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                    • #11
                      The mount for the bender is in the middle of the shop floor to give room for the BFHandle. After driving in the metal inserts I tapped them for 1/2 UNC to use regular bolts. They are easy to remove as needed and the bender can be moved if it is in the way. The shaper and the drill press aren't going to be moved and are tied to the 220 power anyway. The picket twister will be clamped to the welding table when in use and is portable (heavy though). The ring roller may get it's own stand as it will be very heavy to move. In that case it can be bolted down to the same anchors as the bender.

                      The bender has channel iron feet so it can be placed on a couple of rails and it also has two tabs with holes that allow it to be tied to my grinder stand base (very heavy). That is sufficient for most bending and the anchors will only be needed for heavy work.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Have you guys ever heard of Whin Stone I have a load of it in my house and it is hard as thruds sisters cooking meatloaf ever tried drilling holes in it anyof you? it takes ages Alistair
                        Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                        • #13
                          If I had something that was just too hard to move, and it was needed often enough that I didn't want to use the shop crane, then I would probably just mount it on wheels that allow me to roll it up to my mount and anchor it using the receiver. Then I have easy portability, avoid the complexity/effort/compromise of up/down wheels, and don't rely on friction for stable location; all while still having only one rigid mounted inflexible mount taking up space on my floor.
                          Russ
                          Master Floor Sweeper

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                          • #14
                            BD, you ever publish pix of this receiver system?

                            Best,

                            BW
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                            • #15
                              I posted one in the thread where someone asked me about it, and it's reposted below. That just shows the little receiver mounted on the front right of my fab/work table. There are 2 more on the back and another planned for the front left. They are located below the top so it won't be in the way when I work on big stuff. I can put vises in them, fork stands for holding 4x4 axle assemblies, I've even hacked together a temporary bar roller using casters (to form like a v-block) that fit in there.

                              Not much worth taking a pic of any of the others either. There is the floor mounted column for mounting things that need 360* access, or to withstand major pulling/torque like the heavy tube bender. And the portable stands that go into receivers mounted front and rear on my trucks, plus the tongue of the trailer. I've made up 90* attachments to convert vert/horiz as needed. I've got generic work tables fabricated from straight/flat frame sections (the inverted channel make it amazingly rigid, and they have mounting holes for a variety of things). My winch can be mounted in any of the locations. I've even got an adjustable drop hitch that incorporates a step for easy access under the hood (or to the roof of the K5) of my larger 4x4s while also allowing me to hook a trailer to the front for easy tight maneuvering impossible when hooked to the rear. Then there are the bead rollers, benders, brakes, and other tools that are all mounted on simple/cheap 2" square tube and can be mounted anywhere I've put a receiver, including on a truck. I even use the 2 on the back of my fab table for storage (and easy access for small quick jobs) of the bead roller/shear and the strap/bar bender (like a cheap import hossfeld) and the heavy tube bender usually hangs out in the fixed column since it does not store well on a shelf unless you disassemble it.

                              I buy the receiver tube with seam broached out for only a bit more than standard 2.5 x 0.250 square tube. And by standardizing on a single mounting system for all my stuff, it gives a tremendous amount of flexibility. It also keeps storage space to a minimum since each "tool" only consists of a sort of "work head" that can be put on a shelf rather than having a bunch of floor mounted stands. I guess it's obvious that I'm very happy with this system...

                              Russ
                              Master Floor Sweeper

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