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How to determine SS alloys ??

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  • How to determine SS alloys ??

    I purchased samples of 3 stainless alloys (303 annealed, 316 & 416) to "play" with. I requested the supplier to label them and, of course, they didn't. The 416 was easy because it's magnetic, but I need help with the 303 & 316.

    One has a "pitted" surface while the other is smoother.

    Bob

    P.S. 3/16" round rod

  • #2
    You should find the 303 easier to machine than the 316.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
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    • #3
      I worked with some SS yesterday for the first time. I needed to convert a hex cap screw to a slotted flathead screw. Man that stuff works nice and leaves a beautiful finish. No idea what kind of SS it is, but gimme more!

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      • #4
        You could melt them and compare results.

        303 should melt at 1455 C.........316 should go between 1375-1400 C.

        There's a "slight" difference in weight and electrical resistivity...........but I doubt you could measure those without some "real sophisticated" equipment.

        Evan probably could, but then..............He's "THE MAN"...........LOL

        Best bet is the machining ability..........
        RPease

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        • #5
          A chemical analysis is the only way you will know for sure which is which. This will cost A LOT MORE than you spent. Painted ends, for the most part, mean nothing, unless you know the manufacturer or vendor, and the manufacturers or vendors color coding system. There is no industry standard as to "this color is this alloy".

          Contact the supplier, tell them what you requested and what you received, You paid for material with request that it be marked appropriately, and did not get material that was marked. Perhaps they will re-send your request, (correctly this time), at no charge.
          Last edited by ERBenoit; 05-16-2007, 02:07 PM.
          Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

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          • #6
            Me? I'd send them back with a note... "Identical materials not marked - shipment refused".

            I've had the same experience with ordering a couple feet of silver braze, and a couple feet of sterling silver wire. They arrived unmarked. I sent them back. Company apologised, sent a new shipment... properly marked with a tag.

            Of course, I'm not very tolerant of idiots in shipping departments either...

            Paul F.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul F
              They arrived unmarked. I sent them back. Company apologised, sent a new shipment... properly marked with a tag.
              .
              course, if they were that stupid from the get go, it may be the same shipping clerk randomly apply tags to your return and re sending
              .

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              • #8
                LOL!

                Yeah... I wondered about that..
                But the silver solder actually soldered, and since I know from experience that silver WIRE doesn't solder so good, they got it right.
                Of course, he could have guessed and gotten lucky!

                Paul F.

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                • #9
                  Check out this site:

                  http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/id...eel-d_383.html

                  Michael

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael Hall
                    Now THAT is how a response to a request for info SHOULD be provided - short, sharp, to the point and readily used.

                    It is as naear as dammit to the equiveklent to/of the traditional "spark test" for carbon steels that many of us have used or known about since the year dot.

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                    • #11
                      Just machine it, you will know. 303 is a lot easier to work with than 316

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                      • #12
                        316 has more nickel than 303. Flatten a sample of each with a hammer. Whichever one becomes the most magnetic is the 316. 300 series becomes magnetic when work hardened and the more nickel in the alloy the more magnetic it becomes.
                        Last edited by Evan; 05-17-2007, 02:01 PM.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Thanks to Michael and Evan. I'm just an amateur so I don't have access to a lot of equipment, but I do have some muriatic acid and a big hammer, so I'll try your methods.

                          Bob

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                          • #14
                            I told you Evan was "THE MAN"............
                            RPease

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Michael Hall
                              Now THAT is cool! I'm going to look for something like that for aluminum - wish me luck!

                              -Mark
                              The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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