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  • #16
    I have been fascinated and interested in ornamental turning with the rose engine and the ornamental lathe. This has been going on now for hundreds of years and the famous Holzapfel lathes change hands now for big bucks. I have a similar article to this rose engine in a woodworking magazine a few years back.A lot of lords and ladies were involved including kings and queens in this hobby Alistair
    Last edited by Alistair Hosie; 05-23-2007, 04:01 PM.
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #17
      Nice post.
      Just one thing, get rid of the crank and get a geared DC stepper motor.

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      • #18
        IOWOLF,
        Yes, thats in the works right now. We purchased a mill power feed from CDCO and are working on adapting it. The hand crank is not as bad as it seems. It is very low friction and slow speed. I have watched Jon demo the lathe for well over an hour, making one part after another and hand cranking it, while talking to the group. The reason for the hand crank is to keep the cost down.

        Mark Hockett
        Mark Hockett

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        • #19
          And the cams come from???????????????

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          • #20
            Originally posted by IOWOLF
            And the cams come from???????????????
            My CNC mill. But a CNC is not necessary to make them. Randy Knapp uses manual machines to make his rosettes.

            The plans show two rosettes (cams) which a person could spend a lifetime creating thousands of new patterns from. The cam action is different depending on which side of the spindle you are cutting from. If you watch the video Jon shows the four lobe rosette making a square shape on one side of the spindle and a clover shape on the other. There is also a fading stop that stops the headstock from moving at a set point, this will make even more shapes when used with a rosette. That is how the lines on the screw driver handle are made.
            Mark Hockett

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            • #21
              This caught my interest like not much else has. What a fascinating tool. Is the Knapp studio here in Washington? I'd like to see the stuff in person

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              • #22
                dp,
                Randy Knapp is in southern Oregon near the coast. If you want to come over to Whidbey Island Jon has some of Randys pieces, tops and kaleidoscopes. You could even try out the RE lathe.


                Mark Hockett
                Mark Hockett

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                • #23
                  Mark, thanks for the info. Pleased to hear that Jon will be coming to the UK. My home is in Sussex and I shall certainly make an effort to attend any demos that Jon might be planning to do. Perhaps the best thing to do would be to email Jon directly? Would that be OK?
                  West Sussex UK

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                  • #24
                    Now you've done it Mark. My wife thinks that looks really cool and wants me to build one. By any chance is the G-code for the cams available?
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #25
                      Good call Evan, I'd be interested in that too.
                      Hmmm, got some acetal around here somewhere <mutter>

                      If not, I suspect it would not be too difficult to generate G-code mathematically.
                      Not too hard, that is, for someone whose maths is not as rusty as mine
                      Just got my head together
                      now my body's falling apart

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                      • #26
                        Yeah,.. OK.. My interest peaked when I saw other applications.. like sharpening end mills.. replacing the torch pantograph,

                        I have penciled out the "metal" version using a FWD hub off a car. It has a through hole, mounts with three bolts and a splined interior, to mount a faceplate or tool-mount (he he) use the 5 bolt car pattern. THE hand crank will be retained thou.

                        Right now, it looks like the torch pantograph I made last year will hit the scrap pile. I never bought a magnetic follower.

                        In my tiny shop, things that multi-purpose rule. AND, just why does this thing not use a "cheap" router as a power head? I can buy three routers for what one motor costs, and belt drive, that'd take about ten minutes to rig up..

                        I'm still sketching.
                        Excuse me, I farted.

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                        • #27
                          Gcode for the cams? The cams are surprisingly simple. Sometimes as simple as just a few bumps on a round blank. Hardly worth trying to get somebody else's Gcode they're so simple to program. CNC isn't even needed.

                          The seeming complexity of the work comes from how the cams and cutting tools are applied to the workpiece. A few basic cams with a bit of cleverness and there's no end to the designs that can be made.

                          I've had an interest and been involved in OT type work for years. It's fascinating what can be done with simple machines like the lathe shown here.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by IOWOLF
                            And the cams come from???????????????
                            http://www.roseengineturning.biz/rosettes.html

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                            • #29
                              Alan Smith,
                              There is no problem emailing Jon directly, [email protected]

                              David,
                              It would be very easy to adapt a router or dremel tool to work. Jon uses a ball end mill for some cuts and a fly cutter made from an 1/8" carbide 60* engraving tool for other cuts. That’s the nice thing about this is you can experiment with many kinds of cutting tools, there's nothing set in stone.
                              Here is another example of a simple RE lathe,



                              dp,
                              Along with the parts kits Jon also sells just the rosettes, don’t know what the price is but I think they are way cheaper then the ones on that link.


                              Jon read through this post and sent me an email with another reason for the hand crank. This was his comment, "lets you control the speed of the spindle vs. the cutter and stop if anything bad happens"
                              Last edited by Mark Hockett; 05-24-2007, 03:16 PM.
                              Mark Hockett

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                              • #30
                                Oh,great,another hobby I need to get into

                                Neat idea,hope you guys do well with it.
                                I just need one more tool,just one!

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