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  • #31
    Originally posted by Mark Hockett
    dp,
    Along with the parts kits Jon also sells just the rosettes, don’t know what the price is but I think they are way cheaper then the ones on that link.
    Did I miss it or does Jon not have a webpage, Mark? I'm on the brink of spending some money here! I need to get up to Oroville this weekend but think a trip north is in the cards the week after.

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    • #32
      dp,
      Jon does not have a web page. Jon is out of town for a couple of weeks so the timing might be just right for the week after. Where would you be coming from?
      Mark Hockett

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      • #33
        I'm in Bellevue, Mark. Likely I'll be rolling in on my Harley if the timing works out.

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        • #34
          the story is certainly not boring. the video wasn't nearly long enough for me. I always sit staring open-mouthed in wonder at these sort of things. watching this is like watching a cnc machine make things, only better since a person is powering and adjusting it.

          thanks for posting the pictures, story and links.

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          • #35
            Mark

            Thanks for pictures and posting the links. Its very interesting to see how a Rose lathe work and some of what they can do.

            Now the big question question, how much are the kits selling for?

            Hal

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            • #36
              Why is there not a "tracing" outfit for a lathe? I mean I made a sheetmetal template for mine, but.. What a pain in the butt. I had blisters on my hands from cranking handles.


              Example? making english wheel roller profiles.. Chuck a bought wheel on the left side of the through hole, cutter on the right side..

              Enough passes and it matches left side. that pivot could be as simple.
              Excuse me, I farted.

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              • #37
                Hal,
                The kits are $299. The price of the components purchased individually would probably be more than that, but Jon buys the stuff in large quantities so he can sell them for that. The kit includes every thing to build the lathe except the 1/2 sheet of MDF, sealer and glue. It also doesn't include the cross slide, tool post, cutting frame and the parts for the pivot that the cross slide mounts to. These items are more of an individual preference. Used Hardinge cross slides can be purchased on ebay or many other cross slides can be used. The Harbor Freight drill press X slide can be used and the cutting frame can just be clamped in the vise so there is no need for a QCTP or a person could build an X slide with many other scrap pieces. We bought an old Delta lathe X slide at the scrap yard for $10. We are going to try that one on the lathe.
                Mark Hockett
                Mark Hockett

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                • #38
                  The detailed Ornamental work that can be done with a Holzapfel or RE lathe has always fascinated me. Thus a couple years ago when I made a rather large storage and display cabinet for friend wife I wanted to add some decorative columns. Of course the thought of just going out and buying something was never considered. So I kludged together the following accessory for my lathe. It is not as pretty as Jon’s machine but it got the job done.



                  The cutting tool is a small router mounted on the end of arm that’s movement is controlled by two cranks, the length of throw of each crank is adjustable.

                  Viewed from the other side, by changing chain sprockets I can change the speed of one crank in relation to the other. Like Jon’s machine the whole thing is hand powered via the hand wheel. Turning the hand wheel cause the router to jump up and down and move while moving in and out at the same time the long rod on the other side, with a sliding keyway, drives the head stock spindle. This speed can be changed by using different size chain sprockets. The normal thread cutting gears and half nut are used to control feed.





                  This contraption is able to produce lots of interesting designs, however it is difficult to predict exactly what they will look like until you actually run a test piece. Then if you like what you got you need to be prepared to run all of the pieces that to want, because if you stop and change the setup you will find going back to what you had can be a challenge. But it is definitely fun to play with.

                  P.S. Hmmm. $299 sound reasonable, and we wouldn’t talk about what mine would cost.

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                  • #39
                    As usual, Mark: first class work. The plans and instructions for free?
                    Downloaded and saved. Looks like a lot more fun than CNC, but both
                    are a world of fun if you are not trying to make a living from them.
                    Just what I need, another project. If I can get the rest on my stuff fixed
                    and up to speed I'll give the OT project a go.
                    See Nick Carter's info for some G-code starters for CNC.
                    Thanks again for a very interesting post.
                    John Burchett
                    in Byng OK

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                    • #40
                      Excellent thread necromancy here. I'll have to forward it to a friend who likes such things.

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                      • #41
                        It's time to bring this up to the top again

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                        • #42
                          Very interesting. I had not seen this before. All the links seem to be dead. Are any of these guys still around?
                          Kansas City area

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                          • #43
                            The OTI website
                            There is an updated version of the MDF Rose Engine here. They are selling kits as well as completed machines.
                            Click image for larger version

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                            • #44
                              Got it. Thanks!
                              Kansas City area

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                              • #45
                                I attended the ornamental turners conference in the Seattle area around 2010. I did a few sample pieces on my CNC mill to show on the display table. They got lots of interest and speculation about what specialized OT accessories were used to create the complex cut patterns. After a while I admitted they were CNC'd. The reaction was immediate, the OT people were not happy.

                                OT can be a tedious process of setting up complex mechanical devices. And then we have the expense, the real addicts will have machines in the $75K range (I know 4 individuals with well over $100K invested).

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