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7x lathe head on cnc'd x3 mill

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  • 7x lathe head on cnc'd x3 mill

    Finished up the setup. Seems to work real nice after some quickie tests.
    This is just for fun but it should be able to make some nice smallish parts.
    I'll add a spindle sensor so maybe it could do some threading.

    Setup details, 7x head with a dual 3m poly belt drive I made on my 9x lathe.
    Head is bolted through the table and uses a rear clamp also.
    A spindle clamp locks the spindle from rotating. A 3/8" R8 collet is ground so it allows the 4 way tool post to sit flush against the spindle face.
    The quill allows fast tool centering.
    Turning uses the table Y axis for feed and x for travel.
    I have a 7x tail stock also if needed.
    Now I just need to learn how to program it,lol.





    Steve

  • #2
    Very clever arrangement!
    My hat is off to you! (if I was wearing a hat, it would be, anyway...)


    Paul F.

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    • #3
      My question is, WHY ?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by IOWOLF
        My question is, WHY ?
        Because with the addition of a head he now has a CNC lathe and still has the mill.

        Steve,
        Just a suggestion, use left hand tools, insert in upside down and run the head backwards. This way it will transfer the forces onto the tool holder instead of the three screws.

        Plus side is all the crap falls to the bottom as opposed to being thrown out.

        Programming shouldn't be hard, you need to draw 1/2 the profile in 2D and pass that over to Mach as X Y moves.

        .,
        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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        • #5
          Guess I didn't see it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Very creative

            I had thought along similar lines but will now revise those thoughts as there are some good lessons here.

            If the lathe head were on a rotatable calibrated base it would solve a lot of taper turning problems.

            The diameter of the work is only limited by the mill and the centre height of the "head". ("Pack-up" piece perhaps?) so solves a lot of limitations of smaller lathes.

            Should have sufficient rigidity to enabler better use of CT tools.

            Longer taper-turned/ing jobs requiring a tail stock could be incorporated with a bit more creative thinking.

            I am considering using a similar principle for/on my tool and cutter grinder for cylindrical (including taper) grinding using a variable speed (100 - 2000 RPM) small lathe head-stock.

            Comment


            • #7
              If the lathe head were on a rotatable calibrated base it would solve a lot of taper turning problems.
              No need. CNC's turn taper by moving the crosslide out whilst traveling the length of the work, just a diagonal feed.
              If you notice CNC lathes don't have or need top slides, just the two axis that Steve already has.

              .
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



              Comment


              • #8
                To CNC or to not CNC - that is the question

                Originally posted by John Stevenson
                No need. CNC's turn taper by moving the crosslide out whilst traveling the length of the work, just a diagonal feed.
                If you notice CNC lathes don't have or need top slides, just the two axis that Steve already has.

                .
                Quite so John, if CNC is involved - which it isn't at present.

                Further, there are non-CNC circumstances where a lathe compound top-slide is used to set an angle to be turned to match another mating part.

                Not all of us have CNC - me included.

                I saw this as a remarkable adaption of "old" (read "non-CNC") technology used in an "old/non-CNC" way or environment.

                With this set-up all options are open as it can be used "as is" or adapted for CNC if and as required.

                Getting back to the topic, this is a remarkable illustration of lateral thinking (and craftsmanship) and being "big enough" to ask for creative comment and input. It takes a "big" man to do all of those things and in this instance S_J_H has done it in spades.

                In short - I like it - as is - a lot.

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's a pretty cool rig there S_J! Clever.

                  Sir John , how long you reckon it'll be before Stevenson Engineering has an add-on lathe kit available for the X-3?
                  Milton

                  "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                  "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tread warily

                    A word of caution is appropriate here for those that might take this thread further than is necessary and charge into CNC.

                    There is a current thread on the HSM BBS running under the title (I think) of "Used CNC" (by cybor) - it is at: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=24294

                    It is an excellent "heads up" for any considering going into CNC.

                    I suggest a moment of pause and a few deep breaths (and stiff drinks?)before perhaps embarking on a trip on troubled waters.

                    I am NOT against CNC at all and have the highest regard for those that have made a successful "go" of it - John Stevenson and the like.
                    Last edited by oldtiffie; 05-29-2007, 08:34 PM. Reason: Corrected thread title

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the kind words everybody. I had seen a few others on the net doing cnc lathe work on their little cnc bench mills and it looked pretty neat.

                      John, I think you are 100% correct with your observation and I'll give your suggestion a try.The little DC motor does not have a whole lot of beans with the direct drive but it only makes sense to run it in the most rigid way.

                      It seems the surface finish is better than the actual lathe was capable of. Probably from the smoother running poly V belt drive and smooth power feed without any gearing involved.

                      Well I was a total newb to CNC 2 years ago. I did not know cad from cam but it sure looked like fun after seeing what other guys were doing. So I started reading and then converted a x2 mini mill and just learned as I went along.
                      It's just a hobby for me so whether it's manual or cnc work it's all enjoyable.

                      Steve

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                      • #12
                        Looks good to me,are you thinking of adding a stepper motor to the lathe spindle so use as a fourth axis is an option?
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          are you thinking of adding a stepper motor to the lathe spindle so use as a fourth axis is an option?
                          I already added a stepper to my rotary table for a 4th axis

                          But now you got me thinking. I have some spare steppers...hmmm.... a tool changer...nahhhh.
                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            Tilt the rot table for a 5th axis. Better still, add the stepper and tilt to the lathe head. Mill and turn with the same setup - course, then you would really need a tool changer.
                            Location: North Central Texas

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                            • #15
                              Quite so John, if CNC is involved - which it isn't at present.
                              Tiffee,
                              I can see where you are going in using this as manual and yes you are right a swivel will work fine for taper work.

                              I replied in the vein of the original thread which was "7x lathes head on cnc'd x3 mill"

                              Dickbird,
                              No time soon but it may be worth thinking about, too much on the cards at the moment.
                              You can do limited turning with the 4th axis setup like Steve has posted.
                              I 'screwcut ' a length of square thread 1/8" pitch with a 1/8" cutter in brass about 4" long as a test one day. The results were quite good to say it was done in one pass.

                              I believe Nick Carter has some pic's on his Taig site for normal vee threads done the same way.

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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