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Intresting Thingy In Trash. "Oooh! Nice wooden box!"

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  • Intresting Thingy In Trash. "Oooh! Nice wooden box!"

    Normally no one likes trash duty. But sometimes, you find really neat stuff headed for the dumpster.

    I saw this nice wooden box in a trash bin as I was feeding the compactor and said "Oooh! Nice wooden box!" so I grabbed it, and this is what I found in it. Now at 4pm, there was no one around to answer my question. What is it, what do can I do with it and how much can I sell it for?

    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
    Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
    Plastic Operators Dot Com

  • #2
    Appears to be a force measuring device. screw the shaft with the hook onto the threaded stub on the end of the gage and pull on something. Needle should move farther the harder you pull. Or, push. How is the gauge designated? Pounds, grams, ounces, Newtons, etc?
    Last edited by Weston Bye; 05-29-2007, 07:58 PM.
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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    • #3
      Grams. 0-500 grams.

      That's a rather small range. What would something like this be used for in a shop?
      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
      Plastic Operators Dot Com

      Comment


      • #4
        Gauges like that are used for setting spring tension on many types of mechanical devices. Those types of mechanisms are becoming less common as digital servo systems take over positioning duties and other tasks.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          In a machine shop? Nearly nothing. Where I work we make solenoids and other electromechanical devices. In some places we test wire retention in a connector or terminal. Fixture to pull on a wire, see how much force it takes to pull it out of the termination. Some products are electromagnets. We have to test the holding force. If the process is a manual one (not too common anymore) we energize the coil and pull the armature plate away from the magnet with operator brute force. Your indicator is a mechanical one. Most new applicatipons use electronic load cells.

          Other industries might use such devices to measure adhesive retention, sliding force, drag, etc.

          You can hang a pan or cup from the hook, zero the indicator and have a gram scale. Or, hook to a lever of known length and have a torque wrench or gage: Inch/grams, foot/grams, centimeter/grams, you get the idea. I once used one to measure the rotating resistance of an assembly to test for binding spots.
          Last edited by Weston Bye; 05-29-2007, 08:46 PM.
          Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
          ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Wes1
            In a machine shop? Nearly nothing. Where I work we make solenoids and other electromechanical devices. In some places we test wire retention in a connector or terminal.
            Ah ha. We do alot of electromechanical assembly work, or at least we used to. That's where they would have used this.

            Cool.
            This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
            Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
            Plastic Operators Dot Com

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            • #7
              We used one when we molded Kraft cheese lids with the little pop out opening that the consumer opens to dispence the grated cheese. The core that made the detail had shims under it and we would change the shim stack to get the required spec on the pop out (.0005" shims).
              Last edited by lathehand; 05-31-2007, 08:50 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Liger Zero
                Grams. 0-500 grams.

                That's a rather small range. What would something like this be used for in a shop?
                Good score, I use a similar gauge for setting oil ring tension for performance engines.

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