Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Small Spring Problem

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Small Spring Problem

    For my project I need some small compression springs. They need to be no larger than 1/16" in dia. and 1/4 to 3/8" long. I have been searching MSC, McMaster, Brownells, etc. but they do not carry springs that small.

    I did a web search and found several companies the could supply small compression springs with a diameter of 0.057" which would perfect for my need, but the prices are OUTRAGOUS!!! One company wanted $35 each. Another one said that they were $5 each and a $25 small order fee would be added to the order. If I bought in a minium quanity of 1,000 they would be $0.37 each. Several other companies I sent e-mails to, never repiled.

    I only need about 8 or 10 for the project. Does anyone know where I can find a the few springs I need at a reasonable price? Thanks.

    Bill
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  • #2
    google "music wire"
    set up a mandrel in the lathe chuck and wind away in back gear
    Just got my head together
    now my body's falling apart

    Comment


    • #3
      You may want to think about "borrowing" springs from some kind of product. I know I've seen springs that small, in something, but offhand I can't remember what.

      Swarf&Sparks may have the most realistic answer: wind your own from music wire. It would take some experimentation, and they won't be as good as commercial springs, but they may be good enough.

      In brief, the routine is to set up the lathe with a TPI to give the coil spacing you want in the spring, then wind the music wire onto a mandrel. I've never had the nerve to do it under power; I turn the spindle by hand. Since you're winding tempered wire there will be some spring-back when you release tension, so the mandrel has to be somewhat undersize. How much undersize is determined by experiment.
      ----------
      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

      Comment


      • #4
        I, like my dad before me am a scrounger, my first thought was a valve core spring. Cut to length. I use those and the flint spring from a disposable lighter alot.

        Comment


        • #5
          Can you adapt springs from ball point pens?

          Comment


          • #6
            Try the local gunsmith,lot's of small springs in the trigger assembly's.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BigBoy1
              I did a web search and found several companies the could supply small compression springs with a diameter of 0.057" which would perfect for my need, but the prices are OUTRAGOUS!!! One company wanted $35 each. Another one said that they were $5 each and a $25 small order fee would be added to the order. If I bought in a minium quanity of 1,000 they would be $0.37 each. Several other companies I sent e-mails to, never repiled.
              Small springs, small quantities at small prices, this page has your .057" Dia. and 1/4"-3/8" length requirements:

              http://www.smallparts.com/products/descriptions/g26.cfm
              Last edited by ERBenoit; 05-30-2007, 12:27 PM.
              Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

              Comment


              • #8
                How about the spring in the pins that hold the watchband to a wristwatch? I imagine most of us have a few dead watches around. Pull out the pins and see if the springs will work.

                SherpaDoug

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks!!!

                  I checked out the website provided and they have what I want and at a price I can live with. Thanks a bunch for the help!!!

                  Bill
                  Bill

                  Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

                  Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I believe i 've seen them in telescoping gages.Don't know if they are .057 or not. Chris

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Big Boy, be sure and request a catalog while youre at it --- Small Parts is one you need in the catalog stack, got lots of odd/unusual stuff........
                      If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The "$hit hot" box

                        An electrician friend of mine in the Navy used to put just bout everything apart an put them in his several - as he called them - "$hit hot" boxes - screws, springs, nut, bolts, screws - you name it, it went into that $hit-hot box. And you would not believe how often those boxes saved the day and somebodies skin.

                        And how often have you wanted a part that you've ben saving for years and tossed out 2 days ago?

                        I have kept up the "box" practice in small way - and quite often it works. But some go to extremes to the point where the cache is so large that you know its in there but damned if you can find it.

                        Reason for name: people shouted "$hit hot" when they found that elusive or missing part. You can guess what they said when they didn't.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "And how often have you wanted a part that you've ben saving for years and tossed out 2 days ago?"


                          LOL

                          I very rarely throw stuff away. Every now and then i get in a dangerous funk and go through the garage throwing stuff away and cleaning up. BAD IDEA. The next day the garage looks so clean and inviting that i start working on a new project and hey i need that whatchamacallit in the old shoe box ... that i threw away yesterday... dang...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            And how many times have you found 3 of something that you must have 4 off.
                            Boxes or tins of salvaged parts are very useful, I wouldnt be without em but its nice to get the correct parts for that special job - thats why this forum is so useful - so many knowledgably people in so many diverse fields that the knowledges is always on tap (if not always on the same continent)
                            Peter
                            I have tools I don't know how to use!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Next time you need small springs you could try the springs in lock cylinders. The springs that push the pins in towards the key are about .115 in. dia. and some are made of brass or bronze to prevent rust.
                              Ernie

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X