Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

End Mill Sharpening

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • End Mill Sharpening

    Another "machinist 101" question.
    Can end mills be sharpened, and if so; what is the most practical way to do it?

  • #2
    Absolutely.
    For me, the most practical way is to pay someone who knows how.

    There are numerous tool & cutter grinders on the market dedicated to that purpose. They're pretty spendy tho, which is why I cited my "... most practical way".

    However I've watched my son-in-law "touch up" a dull endmill freehand on the benchgrinder...and with good results.

    Some of the regulars on this BB do endmill sharpening on a commercial basis, and can certainly offer more details.

    Comment


    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BOBWRC:
      Another "machinist 101" question.
      Can end mills be sharpened, and if so; what is the most practical way to do it?
      </font>

      Yes, they can be re-sharpened. The ends are easy.

      The OD is not so easy and requires special equipment to do it such the end mill is brought back to original condition. When you grind on the OD of an end mill you eliminate some of the flute's hook which makes it not so effective a cutter. Grind the OD enough and the cutter gets closer to having a negative rake. The solution is to re-flute the cutter, which means re-grinding inside the flutes.

      So, the answer is, the most practical way is to send it to a grinding company who is equipped to do it properly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Bob, if it would be of any help I could E-mail you a photo of the end mill sharpener that I cobbled together. It sharpens the ends only. Regards,George. [email protected]
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the input.
          As a relatively inexperienced machinist, I wasn't sure if there was a realistic method of doing this at home without special equipment.

          G.A. Ewen;
          Thanks for the offer of a photo of your home made sharpener for doing the end on an end mill, but I think that with my limited experience, that any attempt that I might make in this area would most likely result in my ruining end mills that a commercial outlet, or pro with the proper equipment and experience, could rejuvenate.
          Thanks for the kind offer though.
          Bob

          Comment


          • #6
            Bob, I'd like to see your endmill sharpener if you don't mind. Sometime when it's handy send to: [email protected]

            Lynn

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey Bob;
              I'd like to see that setup also if it's not to much trouble.
              [email protected]
              Thanks in advance
              Jim

              Comment


              • #8
                Lynnl and list,
                This is an idea I had a while ago for a cheap tool and cutter grinder.
                Have a look at:-
                http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stevens...20grinder2.jpg

                I have never built one, this is a staged photo but you should get an idea from it.
                Two main components are a cheap 5C spin indexer and the one of those import XY tables.
                All that is needed is to clamp the grinder down on a spacer block to get the right centre high and mount the indexer on some form of tilting angle.

                Ok the XY table will need some rework onit, they all do, but the beauty of this is all the mains parts have dual use. the 5C spin indexer can still be used as an indexer, the XY table still has it's origianl use as does the bench grinder.

                John S.

                [This message has been edited by John Stevenson (edited 04-23-2003).]

                [This message has been edited by John Stevenson (edited 04-23-2003).]
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                Comment


                • #9
                  I sharpen my own for my school shop. If I had to send them out of buy new, they would have to triple my budget.

                  I have one advantage for having some type of sharpener. You can make speciality sizes. Do this often.

                  There are some cheaper sharpeners out there for upwards of $500.00 to 700.00, and they do the job well. Have a cheapie "donated" to me in my school shop awaiting transfer to me at home (got it as pay for a job I did at home). I have used it at home in the summer to supplement income for sharpening for some of the area one man shops - have been offered better contracts, but hold off, I need my time off......

                  I use a KO Lee with an air head at the school, and this is quite out of range for the HSM, est cost about 15K to 20K for my good sharpening tools......
                  CCBW, MAH

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    G.A. Ewen,

                    Can you please e-mail me the photo and I'll poste it here for everyone to see.

                    Albert

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Albert, what is your E-mail address? If there is a way to find it on the BBS it is beyond my computer skills.
                      To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        G.A. Right after where it says "Posted 04-23-03", there are a series of Icons. Click on the second one and it takes you to their email address.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Bob

                          If you are ambitious you could build a Quorn Tool Grinder for yourself. Lots of work. If you go for it I recommend you buy the UK book on building the Quorn.

                          It will certainly test your ability as a machinist.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Guy Lautard (Machinist Bedside Reader author) has a set of plans for a mill and drill grindr attachment, called the Tinker (see web address below). I bought the plans based on a number of recommendations from folks on this board and the chaski board. Doesn't look too hard and can be built without castings, with a little welding and extra machine work.

                            http://lautard.com/tinker-s.htm

                            Jim

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Guy Lautard (Machinist Bedside Reader author) has a set of plans for a mill and drill grindr attachment, called the Tinker (see web address below). I bought the plans based on a number of recommendations from folks on this board and the chaski board. Doesn't look too hard and can be built without castings, with a little welding and extra machine work.

                              http://lautard.com/tinker-s.htm

                              Jim

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X