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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Most here just weld up the spiders when making a well drilling rig.One axle output is used and the other axle thrown out and the tube capped.Then it's just a right angle hypoid drive.Some of the more fancy folks will use a dirt track solid spool in place of the carrier,makes for a cleaner setup and no chance of welds breaking.

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    I would like to see some pics anychance ????Alistair

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    thanks --- just needed to know what was going on, modifying the rear end would be the ticket, spiders arent really meant for a constant work out, they are actually and usually steel gears running on steel drive pins and thier use should be intermittent at best (dont ask me how I know)
    If there was a real quality spider bearing unit out there the handiest thing I can think of useing it for would be the auger feed/auger drive variation, put a friction brake on the auger feed (small hydraulic pump to large hydraulic cylinder) and then you have a medium between the feed and the speed, start to bite off more than you can chew apply the brake --- increase the speed and decrease the feed, Bet Sir John could have one on your desk in the morning, (better be a strong desk though - something tells me it would be heavy )

    Ian, a welded up subaru rear end would probably work fine, Dime a dozen at the salvage yards, plus you get to utilize smoother CV joints instead of U-joints....

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  • Bguns
    replied
    Boomer, A Lincoln Locker (welded side and spider gears) , or a spool or posi rear end will stop the waste of power and double rotation speed issue you are thinking about. The existing upper brake can be utilized as a brake. An old style Dana 4x4 front end has inner oil seals to keep oil in, I would think either overfilling or adding a lower seal would be required for a standard rear axle..

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  • Ian B
    replied
    You're right AK - the gearbox I found was a plain one shaft in, one shaft out, 90 degree drive box.

    On using a diff (either solid rear axle, or IRS) - yes, there is the problem that either the actual differential needs to be locked solid (weld up the gear teeth type thing) or lock the disused output side. As you say, this doubles the speed that you'd otherwise get at the output driveshaft and makes the differential gears run continuously.

    Having those gears running may not be too much of a problem, as the unit will be for hobby use - I'd need to dig an *awful* lot of holes to wear them out I think - but it's a valid point. I'd prefer to lock the gears solid.

    It looks easier using a differential off a vehicle with an IRS; this gives you universal joints as outputs, with oil seals just behind them and no axle tubes to carve up. It also gives you easier mountings, as the differential is normally bolted to a subframe. Jaguar differential maybe?

    Ian

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Forgive me -- its not for my lack of imagination because im now coming up with about 321 different ways -- but none of them seem correct, could you be a little more specific, why one drive and two outputs? or two drives and one output? or One drive and one output with a grid locked output? or One drive one output with a viscous slip mechanizm on the other output?, Or One drive one output with a braking system output used to control auger feed rate?

    You catcha my drift? or should i mention the other 316

    It sounds like Ian was just using a typical two shaft input output, Like i stated in my first post if someone is useing a Diff. in a locked mode its kinda Hack as not only is it being used in a mode that is wasnt designed for, its chewing up parts and power whilst doing it.

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  • Dawai
    replied
    AK the center section is IRS.. has driveshafts on three corners.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Never heard of anyone using a rear diff, whats the layout? do you search for the independent rear diffs that are just a pumpkin or do you use the whole axle, you still drive with the pinion and then lock one of the outputs? this would make the other output do double time (twice the RPM's ) and work the daylights out of your spyder gears, What about lube in that position if its used as the final boring drive, Im just not seeing it I guess, as soon as someone tells me I'll probably go Ohhhh, (or else tell you all kinds of reasons that its Hack )

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  • Ian B
    replied
    Thanks guys,

    Burden Surplus are selling them, $169 each, purpose-built for post hole augers:

    http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.as...07060108323538

    In a way I'm lucky - there's not a single rock on my entire piece of land, it's all clay (which accounts for my machinery sinking to its axles whenever it rains, which is not so lucky...)

    The rear diff sounds tempting - hadn't thought of that. Thanks for the info on a 45hp tractor running an 18" auger Wierd; just what I'm after.

    Ian

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  • Evan
    replied
    All I can say for augers is that they don't even sell them here. This entire province is made of rock. Blasters make a good living though.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    I have a 18" auger that evidently doesn't require too much torque to operate since it bores right in even at idle on a 45hp tractor.It's a 3.5:1 ratio,but 3:1 should work fine.A shearpin on the input would be a good idea though.
    The idea of a car rearend is a good one too,many a shopbuilt well drilling rig uses a car diff for the gearbox.

    Oh,forgot to ask,how much is that gearbox going to cost you?Reason I ask is the entire replacement box for my digger is $360 there abouts and it's specific to the task including mounts for the digger frame.
    Last edited by wierdscience; 06-01-2007, 09:20 AM.

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  • Sophiedoc
    replied
    I don't see a real problem in clay with a 12" auger.Usually what causes problems with augers on tractors or bobcats is rock.Shear bolts go or the machine stalls out.Good quality auger teeth are important.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Auger power

    Originally posted by Ian B
    I'm looking to build a post hole auger to mount on my tractor's 3 point hitch and power it from the PTO via a right angle gearbox. I've found a potential suitable gearbox, 3:1 reduction, rated at just over 1,000 ft lbs on the auger side. 540 rpm input, 170 rpm output, 50 hp rated gearbox, correct rotation.

    My question; when drilling in heavy clay, what diameter auger can I expect to drive with this setup? Anyone have of a rough idea of torque required to turn an auger in clay?

    Many thanks,

    Ian
    Why not talk to your local "BobCat" - or equivalent - operator, hire-out firm, or distributor - or even get a feel for it from the web site?

    All of these people have the knowledge and the vested interest in their equipment so they are in the "have to know" category.

    I will be very surprised if some on this forum can't get you the answers you want.

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  • Dawai
    replied
    Neighbor used a new model ford rear end.. chunk.. it is short, he has a scrapyard so it was about and he didn't have to buy it. WAY overbuilt.

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  • Ian B
    started a topic Post Hole Auger

    Post Hole Auger

    I'm looking to build a post hole auger to mount on my tractor's 3 point hitch and power it from the PTO via a right angle gearbox. I've found a potential suitable gearbox, 3:1 reduction, rated at just over 1,000 ft lbs on the auger side. 540 rpm input, 170 rpm output, 50 hp rated gearbox, correct rotation.

    My question; when drilling in heavy clay, what diameter auger can I expect to drive with this setup? Anyone have of a rough idea of torque required to turn an auger in clay?

    Many thanks,

    Ian
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