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  • Endmill Question

    I went to the endmill store a while ago and, not knowing the exact correct terminology, asked for a downward cutting or reverse spiral endmill. Well they pulled out a few with the helix in the opposite direction, but those also cut in the opposite direction, so the chip ejection would still be upward. i.e. the mill would be tending to pull itself down into the cut. The folks at the store didn't say so, but I almost sensed that they had doubts such an animal even existed.

    Some endmills are made that way aren't they??? i.e. they push the work and the chips downward.
    Am I wrong here?
    I'm thinking that what I want is called a RtHand Cut/L.Hand Spiral.

    [This message has been edited by lynnl (edited 04-24-2003).]
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

  • #2
    You're right.
    Manhattan Supply has them and I have used them to cut laminated shims, and sheet metal parts because they tend to compress the metal togather.
    Also used on metal cutting industrial Routers when cutting various materials to a template.
    kap

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    • #3
      Yes, they are. I know because I have some. There are even some which go both ways and meet in the middle. They're used for side milling so both top and bottom edges don't develop a burr.

      -Dave

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      • #4
        They're called left helix right cut
        Not all that common but easy to get.
        Kerry
        Rule #1 be 10% smarter then what you\'re working on.
        Rule #2 see Rule #1

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        • #5
          I don't know how well they'd work in metal but the woodworking people are selling these things.
          Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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          • #6
            Lynn

            Go to Onsrud's site http://www.onsrud.com/ they have both, as well as "Compression cut endmills" - these are used mostly for plastics and wood to leave a sharp, clean edge after milling (no tearout).

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