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  • Speeder Handle

    I want to build a 'Speeder Handle' for my 4" Kurt style vise, either 3 or 4 arm. Does anybody have a sketch or advice to follow?

    Thanks

    Pat

  • #2
    What's to sketch? Either use a 3/8" drive speeder handle with a socket or whip up an equivalent.

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    • #3
      I use speeder handles for all sorts of things. They look like this:

      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        There are several manufacturers of multi handled speeder handles for Kurt style vises, a look at a tool catalog will show what one looks like.
        Jim H.

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        • #5
          On my 6" it is a 3/4 socket with spokes.

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          • #6
            I got this one from Enco or somewhere a few years ago, stuck it on my 6" Kurt, and have not removed it since. It spins like crazy, and I keep it in place with a magnet. Using both hands, I can tighten it as much as I ever need:



            Cheers,

            Frank Ford
            FRETS.COM
            Gryphon Stringed Instruments
            My Home Shop Pages
            Cheers,

            Frank Ford
            HomeShopTech

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            • #7
              I like this style. You can crank fairly fast when using the center hole and it's small enough to not be in the way.


              http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...MT4NO=23924800
              Jon Bohlander
              My PM Blog

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              • #8
                Speeder handles

                Deleted/erased-out
                Last edited by oldtiffie; 08-20-2007, 07:38 AM.

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                • #9
                  I was quite serious about the drill. I made a simple brass adapter that chucks in the drill and fits over the crossfeed handle on my lathe to rapidly crank it for certain operations. It speeds things up and saves wear and tear on my right hand which isn't all that good these days.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oldtiffie
                    Why the rush?

                    Haste is the invitation to an accident in a work-shop.

                    ".

                    I couldnt agree more, esp. in a home shop environment --- its the last thing i would want to do,
                    But even in my auto garage where time does count (sometimes) , Iv been a wrench for over 30 years and never have purchased an "air ratchet", When working in other shops I witnessed this mindset -- everybody else had comebacks except me, You can get away with allot of stuff in a working environment but dont throw away your "Zen"
                    Iv constantly caught mistakes while using a slower hand ratchet, in fact, the hand ratchet creates a needed "pause" in the hustle and bustle --- its only when you run up against a menial repetitive task that you are given the oportunity for your brain to say "ok -- iv done this a million times and there is really nothing to learn from it so I think I will allow myself to look around and assay the big picture" You not only get the needed break to do this -- you get to do it without a terrible noise buzzing in your ear...

                    Iv found hundreds of other flaws in vehicles while in this mode, Iv also questioned how I was going about things and changed my course from making an error, My "ad-vise" --- get the slowest vise handle that you can possibly find, and if your a home shop and are thinking of getting a power draw bar think twice, although all this "faster crap" will help you turn out work a little quicker your probably going to need too cuz you'll find some of that work back on your bench a second time, Time used properly is probably the most important tool in your shop, But what apears to be a waste to some is actually a proven asset to others, at least its been for me,
                    If your doing a 1,000+ peice job then #1; that really doesnt fall into the home shop catagory too often and #2; dont open your vise handle 5 turns to get your part in and out...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
                      IBut what apears to be a waste to some is actually a proven asset to others, at least its been for me,
                      If your doing a 1,000+ peice job then #1; that really doesnt fall into the home shop catagory too often and #2; dont open your vise handle 5 turns to get your part in and out...
                      On the contrary, to me it seems far more useful in a home/prototype shop where you are NOT putting the same piece in and out of the vise repeatedly. In a single "run" on my mill, I may chuck up a piece of 1" square stock to face/square the sides, next in is a 3x4x1/2 plate faced with some slots, next is a collet block with a shaft, etc. So the vise is running in and out by dozens of turns of the handle. That long dong Kurt handle is a total PIA for this stuff and, if you forget to remove it, you can damage it or your mill with a jam. I've got one of those little SPI 2 position handles linked earlier and I love it. "Rapid" enough for anything I need, in the outboard hole it's strong enough (with a little grunt) for all but the heaviest hogging work. And it stays in place all the time so it's handy (no more "Where did I lay that [email protected]^% handle this time!" episodes) and no risk of jamming. Likewise, and for similar reasons, I love the rapid on my x-traverse and dream fondly of the day I have a real rapid/power on the knee. MAN it gets old cranking it up and down to swap out a collet/cutter for a drill chuck. I also have my vise mounted to one side so I can work on the table without removing and resquaring it. Cranking the knee for that sort of change is also a hoot...

                      So, while the risk is certainly there, and the reflection time surely has merit (both more so for HSM that pro), the shear wide variety between sequential operations in a HSM/Proto shop strongly supports the use of "rapid" enhancements, at least to some extent.
                      Russ
                      Master Floor Sweeper

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                      • #12
                        Can't wait?

                        Originally posted by Evan
                        I was quite serious about the drill. I made a simple brass adapter that chucks in the drill and fits over the crossfeed handle on my lathe to rapidly crank it for certain operations. It speeds things up and saves wear and tear on my right hand which isn't all that good these days.
                        Just can't wait for someone to ask you a question? Or to post a picture?

                        Go for it Evan.

                        Kap

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My vise didnt come with a handle so I built one --- its a simple T handle, a hole through a deep well impact socket to accept a straight shaft, I know the single kurt swivel handles your talking about and they are fast enough although thier not something you fling and stand back and watch tighten, all you have to do is put them almost straight and just a little cocked then you use them like that till you get to the leverage part -- im in agreement with you though --- I dont like the way they flail about and they have a tendency to fall off and stuff, My T-handle lives on my vise and never comes off, its not the fastest but personally I like that, because I have two 180 degree leverage points I can also get by with handles that are about twice as stubby, it never gets in the way and I can totally torque out on it if need be, If I have the total distance to cover from all the way open to all the way closed I can spin my T-handle with one finger and yes thats pretty fast but is not the reason why I built it.

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                          • #14
                            Grizzly sells one that looks the same as the one pictured by Frank Ford for 9.95 each, I have two, one with the handles shortened two inches so it doesn't interfere with the Y axis handle.

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                            • #15
                              I really dont think it that bad of a thing but I do get a little suspect when I see too many time saving gadgets, Its not nessasarly the gadget itself as the mindset of the person using it, over the years iv seen a few guys butcher aluminum cylinder heads with "power gasket scrapers" and watched many other errors occure like warpage of covers with air ratchets and stuff, My bro who was a mechanic witnessed guys borderline destroying engine blocks with an auto body metal grinder and all they were doing was removing head gasket material from the block, I just dont get it and I never will, Its not to say I dont own an air hammer and an impact wrench, but its for thier unique qualities that I cant duplicate --- and the impact can be a speed thing with dissasembly although im even careful with that if its a complex thing that I need to pay attention on how it comes apart - No thanks - Id rather do it by hand --- also own a little 20,000 RPM disc tool for cutting off bolts and such, I cant spin something that fast by hand and it comes in handy ------ From what iv witnessed over the years even if somebody gets by with a ton of time saving crap they end up paying the fiddler in not being thorough because they are so consumed with speed that the entire job suffers with this mindset, I.E. leaving loose clamps or bolts or flat out missing the big picture...
                              Im not making anything up when I say I really cant remember what my last automotive comeback was, when something was truly my fault, I can honestly say that its been years, But im a funny bird that way - it sickens me inside if I cannot account for the tightening of a fastener or something, about a decade ago I couldnt sleep and ended up at a customers house at 1:30 AM with a lug wrench in my hand checking his lugs in his driveway while his motion sensor light went off (and dogs started barking), Too embarrassed to tell the guy because that doesnt exactly instill confidence in your mechanic, but overidden by not letting it get in the way of safety --- his porch light came on as I was speeding away and im sure he got a glimpse of my car but he never said anything, months later I brought it up to him and he was actually impressed but it botherd the hell out of me that he drove it home and I could not recall putting the final torque on them, by the way --- the lugs were tight anyways....

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