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  • stone bollards

    Growing up in Seattle I saw lots of bollards on the waterways, but they were all cast metal. In Ireland I saw these stone bollards, on a small pier on Dunmanus Bay in County Cork. I wondered how they are made. Chiseled by a mason freehand? It's seems unlikely that they were put between lathe centers, but I don't know.

    Any ideas?



    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    You gotta love the Irish..

    No doubt the Irish will have a colourful yarn or two to explain
    Ken.

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    • #3
      initially misread your title as "stone bollocks".......

      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        To bad you couldn't have removed that raggedy rope so you could have take a better picture
        Glen
        Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
        I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
        All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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        • #5
          Chances are they were cut "freehand". I've been quite involved with stone masons and stone cutting over the last 2-3 years and it would amaze you how well they can create curving planes, not just once but repeatedly so that a series of stones fit together. Wide use is made of templates cut out of thin tinplate.
          However lathes are commonly used for cutting stone cylinders and indeed any other turned shape, finials etc. I know these lathes existed at least as far back as the mid 18th century for producing columns. I have in my garden a granite table and stools all the components for which have been turned from blocks of granite, the table column is 28" high by 12" dia the table top is a disc of approx 40" dia. With granite I'm sure the cutting is actually a grinding process but softer stones are cut with carbide tooling.
          West Sussex UK

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          • #6
            Here is the book that will explain it all it is part of 4 volumes om turning and the machines needed to do it. This list the stone masons equipment along with other odd things turned and with the use of abrasives. I have the set of books they are quite interesting. In the info that was assembled by the family that made the equipment and wrote the books.
            http://www.astragalpress.com/holtzap...oodturning.htm

            They were being sold here at greatly reduced prices.http://www.edwardrhamilton.com/
            They have books on subjects that you didn't know know they needed books on LOL.
            Glen
            Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
            I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
            All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

            Comment

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