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Maybe OT(??) Who was/is the most famous machinist?

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  • Maybe OT(??) Who was/is the most famous machinist?

    Who do you think would be considered the most famous machinist(living or dead)? Since I'm a gun guy, I'll throw out the names of John M. Browning, John C. Garand. The sleeper,in my mind, would be John Dillinger,who is much more famous for his unlawful escapades than his listed profession on his wanted posters. Chime in.
    I bury my work

  • #2
    Recently a guy in Mt. Clemens, a Detroit suburb, achieved a measure of noteriety by dismembering his wife's corpse in the family machine shop. Ugh!
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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    • #3
      [QUOTE=recoilless]Who do you think would be considered the most famous machinist(living or dead)? QUOTE]

      Define "machinist"?? And "what" makes you think that Dillinger was one? Or is being "handy" with a Thompson machine gun or BAR the qualification for that.

      I know......I know.......You're going to mention that Dillinger "modified" his weapons and "maybe" made some improvements, but I hardly think that qualifies him as a machinist.

      JMHO......
      RPease

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      • #4
        Originally posted by recoilless
        Who do you think would be considered the most famous machinist(living or dead)? \
        James Nasmyth, who invented the milling machine.
        Allan Ostling

        Phoenix, Arizona

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        • #5
          aostling
          I have a book that says J.R. Brown of Brown&Sharpe designed the milling machine for cutting flutes on drill bits to speed up production, but I have been wrong before.

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          • #6
            Eli Whitney

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            • #7
              Joseph Whitworth

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              • #8
                Two Brits:

                Henry Maudslay, who invented the first metal lathe in 1797

                Sir Joseph Whitworth, who was the first to apply precision scraping methods to machine design, was the machinist who built a major portion of Charles Babbage's Difference Engine, invented the Whitworth thread, and invented a bunch of clever mechanisms for the state-of-the-art Victorian-era machinery, including the Whitworth Quick Return that's used on most shapers:

                http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/b/shc.html

                Whitworth demonstrated a surface plate accurate to within a microinch at the 1851 World's Fair, and also demonstrated a precision micrometer-based Height Gage which was accurate enough to measure it
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  By the way, in Machine Tool Operation, by Harry Burghardt, he mentions that George Westinghouse, Henry Ford, and John Fritz (who founded Bethlehem steel) were all professional machinists in the early part of their careers.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    Sir Henry Royce. [
                    Les H.
                    The Impossible Takes Just A Little Bit Longer!

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                    • #11
                      Whitworth and Frank Whittle.
                      Both were men light years ahead of their time and both shat on by the establishment.

                      Whitworth proved his gun was far superior to anything we had at the time but Armstrong had more presence in court and so his gun was adopted.
                      The result was we got slaughtered at the Crimea because we were within enemy range well before the Armstrong gun was.

                      If we had adopted the Whitworth gun we could have fired on them from 2 miles out of range.

                      Ironically the Americans ' invented' the hexagon round for their main battle tank 120 years after Whitworth had perfected it.

                      Whittle was the same, put down from the start because the head of the committee who was passing work grants recognised that he was in competition with said head shed so grant money had held back.

                      It's worth pondering that for the sake of the sum of £200 needed to get the first engine running 4 years earlier than it did we might never have had WWII because Hitler only invaded the low countries because he'd been assured that the Germans ruled the air. Something that couldn't have happened if we had the jet before the war started.

                      During the war they then took his company Power Jets off him, forced him to sell his shares and gave the company to Rolls Royce.
                      During the war they then gave the jet engine to the US and at the end of the war gave it to the Russians, gave not sold, and gave something that wasn't even theirs to give.

                      Derby the home of Rolls Royce now has a twiddling little road named after him and that is all there is to show. The modern success of Derby is based on Rolls Royce but it took 50 years to even get a 1 mile stretch of road named after him.

                      Recently they have named the 18 mile main road between Nottingham and Derby after a football club manager. Someone who brought employment to 22 men, Frank Whittle brought employment to millions.

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #12
                        Henry Ford.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Marshal Tito
                          Somewhere on the interweb there's a picture of Tito working on something in his Myford, but I can't find it.

                          Nick
                          Largest resource on the web for Taig lathes and milling machines, www.cartertools.com

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                          • #14
                            The Wright Bros. and Antonio Stadivari.
                            Gene

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by John Stevenson
                              Whitworth and Frank Whittle.
                              Both were men light years ahead of their time and both shat on by the establishment.
                              Wow, interesting story John. I've never heard of Frank Whittle, but he sounds like he was screwed over as badly as Nikola Tesla.
                              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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