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Maybe OT(??) Who was/is the most famous machinist?

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  • #16
    Leonardo Da Vinci?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by DR
      Leonardo Da Vinci?
      Well, at the risk of this thread digressing into "what is a machinist", DaVinci was one of the most brilliant artists and engineers in human history, but metalworking machinery wasn't invented until the 18th century
      Last edited by lazlo; 07-19-2007, 04:44 PM. Reason: spelling
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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      • #18
        God.

        Creation of the whole mess in six days.

        Woman from a rib - well I guess I can forgive him for having an off day.

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        • #19
          You guys have named a lot of guys that Most of us never heard of, to be Famous or infamous Folks have to know your name.

          If you're in the gun world perhaps Colt, Browning , Garand, even Ruger, or Maxim, if you are in the car world ,Ford, Ferrari, Porsche, or Carrol Shelby.

          And so on. so It is from Your point of view, and yours alone whom you think is Famous.
          IMHO

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          • #20
            Originally posted by J.Ramsey
            aostling
            I have a book that says J.R. Brown of Brown&Sharpe designed the milling machine for cutting flutes on drill bits to speed up production, but I have been wrong before.
            Me too. This was something I read in a book over forty years ago. I can't find any confirmation that Nasmyth invented anything other than the steam hammer.
            Allan Ostling

            Phoenix, Arizona

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            • #21
              The most "Famous?"

              Just as with any other field, fame only means celebrity, and may not have any bearing on ability or real accomplishment. I'm more than a bit put off by the extent to which celebrity worship has grown in our society.

              So, for those who might like a quick antidote or chuckle, I offer this:

              Every so often I’m “challenged” by a prospective customer who insists that i produce a list of celebrity musicians for whom I’ve worked, presumably because that would “establish credentials,” or something.

              My first response is to tell him (they really are always men, you know) that our shop does not particularly cater to high profile professional musicians for a number of reasons. We’re not in a major recording or performance venue area, so we simply don’t see that kind of traffic as do our friends in Nashville, Los Angeles, Austin, or wherever. And, we truly don’t believe that a celebrity musician is any more demanding or knowledgeable that many of the dedicatecd amateurs for whom we work regularly.

              Often, that’e enough to defuse the situation, but now and again there’s the fellow who simply must throw down the proverbial gauntlet and challenge the situation.

              Simply by accident I hit upon a routine that drives these guys absolutely nuts. It goes something like this:

              “So, what you’re saying is that nobody important ever comes in here. Otherwise you’d have a name for me.”

              “No, what I’m saying is that celebrity is not an issue here.”

              “Right. That means you don’t have any important clients.”

              “Well, if you insist, the most famous person we’ve sold an instrument to is so much better known than anybody you’re thinking of, it’s not even worth discussing.”

              (Oops, looks as though I just threw gasoline on the fire, yes?)

              “Oh, yeah? So WHO IS THAT?”

              “Well, not so long ago SHIRLEY TEMPLE bought a guitar here.”

              (Neener, neener, neener. . .)
              Cheers,

              Frank Ford
              HomeShopTech

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              • #22
                [QUOTE=Frank Ford]

                “Well, not so long ago SHIRLEY TEMPLE bought a guitar here.”/QUOTE]

                You might get away with dropping Neil Young's name too. His ranch is just over the hill, on Bear Gulch road.
                Allan Ostling

                Phoenix, Arizona

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                • #23
                  Do engineers count?

                  I caught a programme on the box the other night. " Seven Wonders Of the Modern World" or some such.
                  the particular subject was a British engineer by the name of Isambard Kingdom Brunel; in particular the building of the SS Great Britain.
                  What a man! I had never heard of him previously but that isn`t surprising. There are so many people of merit whos contribution is forgotten or overlooked.

                  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/histori...isambard.shtml
                  Last edited by speedy; 07-19-2007, 05:46 PM.
                  Ken.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by aostling
                    Me too. This was something I read in a book over forty years ago. I can't find any confirmation that Nasmyth invented anything other than the steam hammer.
                    aostling
                    My book that was talking about is The Modern Gunsmith Vol. I & II by James V. Howe 1934, Of the famed Griffin& Howe Gun Works, mine are second edition Copywright 1941 handed down to me by my father many years ago.
                    The work they performed is still second to none even by todays standard.
                    Sorry not trying to hijack this thread.
                    Last edited by ; 07-19-2007, 05:56 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by aostling
                      I have a book that says J.R. Brown of Brown&Sharpe designed the milling machine
                      Me too. This was something I read in a book over forty years ago. I can't find any confirmation that Nasmyth invented anything other than the steam hammer.
                      I've read in a couple of books that Eli Whitney (of Cotton Gin fame) invented the milling machine in 1818, but that Joseph A. Brown (of Brown & Sharpe) invented the knee and column milling machine in 1862:

                      http://www.metalartspress.com/PDFs/Bridgeport.pdf

                      This is a neat history of modern machinery from ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers). Other than EDM, basically nothing has been invented in the machinery world since 1933, when DoAll invented the die filer:

                      http://www.asme.org/Communities/Hist...hine_Tools.cfm

                      Notice that Nasmyth is credited with inventing the shaper in 1836...
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                      • #26
                        John. you guys had the next best thing.(or two) The superb Spitfire and the Rolls Royce Merlin engine.


                        Most famous machinist/

                        Edison

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                        • #27
                          I'm kinda surprized no-one's mentioned Henry Ford. When he started in 1890 when "machinist" was just burgeoning as a trade; like computer programmers in the '60's.

                          Not to say the many pioneers of the machine and machine tool industry (Naismith, Whitworth, Morse, Sharpe, Hartness, Shipley, Herbert, etc and my personal favorite Stanley Colvin. There were also many greats in other countries who pioneered the trade themselves many time re-inventing the wheel but often making discoveries

                          Can I honor my apprentice instructor from way back when? Ray F McBride was a great old machinist. He worked everywhere from Athol, Mass to the Oklahoma oil fields, a repair ship in the Pacific during WW II, and lots of points in between. He was a harsh old bastard but he taught us a lot. Reason why I know all this is we used to get him yarning during class and he'd BS away a whole hour. We got a lot of history.
                          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-19-2007, 06:59 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Rustybolt
                            John. you guys had the next best thing.(or two) The superb Spitfire and the Rolls Royce Merlin engine.


                            Most famous machinist/

                            Edison
                            Rusty, I served my time working on the detuned version of the Merlin that was fitted into the Centurion tank, called the Meteor.
                            The crank grinders were that old that the continious sparks from the grinding had etched the vee's off the bed.
                            If you had to move the headstock and tailstock along to bed to do a different type of crank you had a long setup

                            On test on the dyno's they had no fan belts fitted and a simple tin guard over the pulley. No manifolds were fitted so you could watch the exhaust.
                            Coolant was handled by big evaporator tanks on the roof of the test hall.
                            To set the carbs you had to lie full length of the engine on the top with a couple of special spanners and set the carbs for 6" of blue flame at flat out revs.

                            First couple of times were scary.

                            .
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                            • #29
                              Well, if "famous" includes "notorious", Stalin was a machinist before he got into the business of killing his countrymen.

                              Rather than worrying about "fame", a more useful question would be which machinist contributed the most to the field of metalworking. Maudsley would get my nod on that score.

                              topct wrote:

                              The Wright Bros. and Antonio Stadivari.

                              The Wright Brothers were accomplished experimental engineers but their machinist was Charles Taylor, IIRC. Antonio Stradivari (not Stadivari) was a luthier, not a machinist of any stripe.
                              Regards, Marv

                              Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                              http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                              Location: LA, CA, USA

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                              • #30
                                Forrest
                                Not trying to nit pick but post #12 by Evan was Henry Ford

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