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Maybe OT(??) Who was/is the most famous machinist?

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  • #31
    BBC series

    Deleted/erased-out
    Last edited by oldtiffie; 08-20-2007, 04:08 AM.

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    • #32
      Lazlo also mentioned Ford in passing before I did. Ford may not have been a stellar machinist, I don't know. He was however a household word/name for many millions of people. You would have been hard pressed in the early part of the last century to find a person that didn't know who he was. More importantly, he had a huge impact on the working environment of the ordinary factory worker. He was the first to pay a real living wage to factory workers, the fantastic sum of $5 per day when a dollar a day was common. Of course many other events transpired later but if nothing else he was originally a machinist (working for Edison) and he most certainly was famous.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #33
        same question but year 2075

        "same question but year 2075"
        Lets jump ahead a bit, but ask the same question:
        Evan was nominated, but kept trying to get the last word in...
        Forest was in but lost by a scrape to....
        John S. got most of his votes from the Chinese(who at this point did 99% of the mfg and had 70% of the population) who were
        blinded by his brilliance and baffled by his [email protected]
        eddie
        please visit my webpage:
        http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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        • #34
          Dang. I missed it. Would you believe bicofals? A moth on the screen? How about don't see-um?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Forrest Addy
            I'm kinda surprized no-one's mentioned Henry Ford.
            We did Forrest. Twice
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #36
              Originally posted by J.Ramsey
              Forrest
              Not trying to nit pick but post #12 by Evan was Henry Ford
              Or post number 9 by Lazlo was Henry Ford

              http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...58&postcount=9
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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              • #37
                I can't believe noone's mentioned Laroy Starrett.
                Inventor of the combination square. (and the "Hasher").
                Not to mention, he created a little company called: The L.S. STARRETT Co.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by mklotz
                  The Wright Brothers were accomplished experimental engineers but their machinist was Charles Taylor, IIRC. Antonio Stradivari (not Stadivari) was a luthier, not a machinist of any stripe.
                  Yeah, I think a lot of folks are confusing inventors with machinists.

                  Edison was a fantastic inventor, but doubtful as a machinist. Edison was instrumental in the Kinetoscope and the Vitascope projectors, for example, but the machine work was done by others in his company.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #39
                    I'll cast my vote for Walter P. Chrysler, who's position was that if a man didn't build his own tools, how would he know if they were any good?

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                    • #40
                      Whoa, how does that happen?!? I was just going to bone up on Whittle a little and it's an hour and a half later having visited Whittle, various aircraft, turbo and superchargers, opposed piston diesel engines for aircraft, ships, and trucks, blower efficiencies, the Bourke engine idiosynchrasies of the F4U and on and on.

                      Honestly, you guys. There oughtta be a law against getting some of us started ...
                      .
                      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                      • #41
                        Lots of great men mentioned, I'll add the Stanley twins, second for Ford, Nasmyth, and others. How about Harry Pope for you gunsmiths out there.

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                        • #42
                          Yes some times my mouth runs faster then my brain at least I'll admit it unlike some others here.
                          H.M.Pope was the premier barrel maker in his time, and some say to this day if your shooting cast bullets from a mold that he cut with his own cherries.
                          Last edited by ; 07-20-2007, 12:22 AM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by recoilless
                            Chime in.
                            Speaking of chimes, how about William Harrison, inventor of the marine chronometer? Of course this was in the 1760s, so he may have done it mostly with a file and saw. Did they have watchmaker's lathes at this early date?
                            Allan Ostling

                            Phoenix, Arizona

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                            • #44
                              No one mentioned Nevil Shute (Christian) !

                              An actual engineer and machinist (he had a Myford ML or Super 7 as I recall) and was written up in Model Engineer several times.

                              Arguably very famous, based on the number of novels he wrote, including the EXTREMELY famous On the Beach (also a movie), No Highway in the Sky ( a Jimmy Stuart movie for gosh sakes!) and many, many more. Search the archives for Nevil and you'll see plenty of discussion; he may well be the most famous machinist discussed on this board, other than Evan, Mr. Addy, Thrud, et. al. :-)

                              Regards,

                              Jeff E.

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                              • #45
                                Carn the Brits and Europeans

                                Deleted/erased-out
                                Last edited by oldtiffie; 08-20-2007, 04:07 AM.

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