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  • Battery charger

    Trying to locate a supplier for a 6 -12 volt 10 amp manual battery charger,or the parts to make it myself. Seems this used to be a very common item, but I am having major problem to find. Must be as specified. Must be manual, with no auto functions. It will NOT be used as a charger, but as a power supply and will be modified to provide both AC and the normal DC putput at both 6 and 12 volts.

  • #2
    Computer power supply might be a good and cheap starting point.
    Reduce one of the 12v outputs to 6v.Done and dusted.
    Hans

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    • #3
      http://www.weldingmart.com/Qstore/c000322.htm
      "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

      "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

      "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

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      • #4
        Many years ago, I built a battery charger that has served me well:

        12VAC transformer
        10 amp bridge rectifier
        smallish Variac, probably rated an amp or 2 that feeds the transformer primary
        meter that goes to 10 amps
        fuse holder w/fuse in output side, using 6 amp fuse
        case
        cords, clips, plug, etc.

        Years later, I added a 12-hour timer that came from a pallet jack charger.

        I can set the output for any value I want, so it's useful on motorcycle batteries, etc. It's not too good if I'm in a hurry.

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        • #5
          How close to the voltages have to be, and do they need to be regulated? You can use any charger capable of those outputs, including the 'smart' ones, but you would have to dig into it and pull the voltages out before the charging regulator circuit. The voltages would be high, and possibly not filtered. This could be true of the old style manual chargers as well. High would be probably about 20-24 volts for the 12 volt setting, and about half that for the 6 volt setting, these voltages being without a load. It really depends on what you'd be powering whether you can get away that easily or not. You may need to add a regulator circuit to it, and you probably will have to add a good sized filter capacitor to it, whether the old style manual charger, or the newer type.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            Saw a 6/12 volt, 2 amp, 10 amp, 55 Amp Starting assist battery charger at Walmart just about 2 hours ago, I think the price was either $29.99 or $39.99. Should be easy to open up and add the AC connections you need.
            Steve
            NRA Life Member

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RetiredFAE
              Saw a 6/12 volt, 2 amp, 10 amp, 55 Amp Starting assist battery charger at Walmart just about 2 hours ago, I think the price was either $29.99 or $39.99. Should be easy to open up and add the AC connections you need.
              Whew, glad I read that more carefully. Just the first glance with the "Saw a 6/12 ..." and thought there was going to be a smarta$$ suggestion to take a 12V charger and saw it in half to get 6 volts.
              .
              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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              • #8
                Hmm. I guess if you only needed one volt, and had a 30 volt power supply, that would be a lot of sawing,
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #9
                  I dont think a PC power supply is a good idea as they need a constant load else they cook themselves - they use switch mode to supply the volts.
                  Just get a 9v / 18v transformer and a full wave rectifier you will then have the ac volts and the dc output volst will vary a bit depending on the load if you just want the current then feed the transformer with a variac as I do fir an ammeter and vary current using variac just the job as lead acid bats need the amps not the volts (but not to high)
                  Peter
                  I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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