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avoiding marking round stock in the lathe

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  • avoiding marking round stock in the lathe

    when turning threaded rod or metal in the round that must not be marked by the lathe jaws upon tightening , I see the old guys using thin tinplate metal I tried using leather and it seems to work ok what do you guys do ?Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    Alistair, I use strips of Aluminum Foil, or strips of plain Brown paper bags, or notepaper.

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    • #3
      I have a roll of lead sheet about 1" wide and maybe 50feet of it. It's a shade under 1/16th thick. It also works to line wooden blocks to pull gun barrels off without marring the finish. I've seen some guys here using copper pennys here for some clamping operations.
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      • #4
        You might want to make up a few "bushings" or "split collars" from PVC pipe. Just take a length of PVC equal to the bearing surface of the jaws and slit it on one side with a hacksaw. A few various sizes will cover most situations -- just slide it on your round bar and tighten the jaws. It holds itself in place (assuming it has a smaller ID than the stock's OD) which is nice.
        Lynn S.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
          when turning threaded rod or metal in the round that must not be marked by the lathe jaws upon tightening , I see the old guys using thin tinplate metal I tried using leather and it seems to work ok what do you guys do ?Alistair
          That is what old empty aluminium beer cans are good for Alistair.
          Last edited by speedy; 07-26-2007, 07:10 PM.
          Ken.

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          • #6
            Copper sheeting works excellent. .020 thickness is what I use.
            Doesn't mare the blueing on firearms or the polished finish on aluminum parts.
            Leather won't compress evenly when you tighten the jaws.

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            • #7
              I use duct tape, color does not matter, but if it slips it will cut through and mar the piece, works well most of the time. Also will use thin aluminum or tin whatever is handy.

              Ed

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              • #8
                I cut strips from aluminum cans. I also have some strips of copper.
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  Surface protection

                  I keep a supply of 3x5 cards on my work table to write down dimensions that require some computation. I use these cards and tape them onto the round stock that I don't want to mar. I trim them to fit with a pair of sisors. I have a adjustable 6 jaw chuck that I really like. Don't know how I got along without it.

                  Steve Acker in one of his gunsmitihing videos introduces a technique for applying a bushing to the tapered surface of a gun barrell that needs to run in a steady without marring the existing bluing. He uses an oversize bushing and secures it with bondo body putty. He trues the bushing then puts the bushing in the steady. The bushing is remover with heat from a butane torch and the bondo justs flakes off the blued surface. Not an ever day technique but a good trick to have in your tool box.
                  Byron Boucher
                  Burnet, TX

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
                    when turning threaded rod or metal in the round that must not be marked by the lathe jaws upon tightening , I see the old guys using thin tinplate metal I tried using leather and it seems to work ok what do you guys do ?Alistair

                    I thought you were one of the old guys.

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                    • #11
                      Many ways.

                      Use a collet.
                      Packing on the jaws.
                      Split bushes

                      Don't tighten the chuck jaws

                      .
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #12
                        When turning crome shaft I use worn out emory cloth with the grit towards the jaws.

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                        • #13
                          i got a length of copper grounding wire from home depot. just under 1/4" diamiter i think. worked pretty good

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                          • #14
                            I have used old Gerber plastic cups cut into strips along with using aluminum and copper strips. Copper water pipe cut into strips. JRouche
                            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                            • #15
                              Pennies
                              it will only cost 3 to 6cents
                              depending on the number of jaws

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