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  • Grinding rest question

    I've been building the grinding rest shown on Mr. Ishimura's website. It will be bolted down next to my old Craftsman grinder so that i can (hopefully) upgrade my tool grinding results.

    I've finally got it to the stage where I have to build the table itself. It will have a slot milled across the table to index the miter/slide device.


    So far I've made everything from scraps I have lying around but was wondering what you fellers think would be a good material to make the table from. I have some 1/2" X 6" aluminum, some 1/2" thick grey plastic sheet that I think is HDPE and a small square of 9/16" thick cast iron. Anybody have an opinion on what would be best to use in a grinding environment?
    Milton

    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

  • #2
    My preference would be a piece of stainless steel because you will be sliding things across it and it wont rust when you spill water on it cooling things off. Next would be the castiron it will rust some but not like steel and tools will slide on it easy. Don`t use aluminum tools wont slide on it easily. Very nice looking attachment and I know from experience it will come in very handy.
    Last edited by lane; 07-28-2007, 06:52 PM.
    Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
    http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
    http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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    • #3
      I think I would go with CI and a 1/4 deep guide groove. From your list, aluminum would be my second choice, but it will get chewed up, or at least it would if it were mine. Steel would be a close second to CI IMO. I don't think the HDPE will work well given the heat.
      Russ
      Master Floor Sweeper

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      • #4
        DICKEYBIRD,

        Very nice work!

        Not a suggestion but I make my grinding rest tables from corrian, especially if they have sliding parts. Grinding dust is murder on those surfaces so I consider the tables "disposable". Also, I have several tables that have several grooves milled into them for each style of lathe bit I'm grinding. That way I don't have to make any adjustments and I'm right on for each re-sharpening!
        Last edited by Mike Burdick; 07-28-2007, 06:58 PM.

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        • #5
          Thanks, I didn't even consider rusting due to the water used for cooling; duhh! Stainless sounds great but I'm completely clueless as to what type or where to get a piece that is reasonably priced (that's a big factor in my stuff...it has to be cheap) and doesn't have a severe machining issue, like work-hardening. Any suggestions?

          The plastic woudn't rust....I used a piece for a bandsaw mini-table and it was fairly decent. Grit got embedded into it though, being soft.

          The one I plagiar...uhhh, researched by Mr. Ishimura looks like it has a fabricated brass table. No rust, but how does brass do around abrasive grit?

          What do real tool grinders use for their tables? Looks like the ubiquitous Harbor Fright grinders have a cast iron table.
          Milton

          "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

          "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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          • #6
            Any of the decent tool grinders, from the Baldor size/style up to the KO Lee and B&S shur-nuf tool grinders all have CI tables.
            Russ
            Master Floor Sweeper

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            • #7
              Most good grinders have cast iron tables Cheap ones use a bent piece of steel.
              I still say stainless steel 1/4 inch would be thick enough but 3/8 would be better a piece about 3/8 x 3x4 inch ought to be good. Any kind of ss will work Just slow your mill down and take it easy no big cuts and slow rpm. Square it up and cut a slot about 1/2 inch wide 1/8 inch deep.
              Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
              http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
              http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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              • #8
                I agree with Lane on the stainless --- would be worth the effort to try and hunt up that small a piece for this purpose.
                Aluminum is pretty poor for this application, it'll have burrs and bumps on it in no time and will snag anything you try to slide over--- Probably a toss-up between steel and CI as second choice.
                If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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                • #9
                  What ever you use for the table , the use of Slick Plate every month or so will keep CI fom rusting and alum from grabbing. Also much easier to clean up as the grit seems to just blow off with an air hose. Enco is a supplier.

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                  • #10
                    I'm leaning towards using the hunk of cast iron I have and the coating idea sounds good. I did a quick search for "Slick Plate" at Enco and Google and didn't find anything. Is it known by another name perhaps?
                    Milton

                    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I looked at the grinder rest on Ishimura's site: http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/gr...ing_rest-e.htm

                      You've done a nice job duplicating his rest. His seems to have a base (steel or aluminum?) for the brass guides. I'd vote for a 1/4" aluminum base plate with HDPE guides in place of the brass.

                      I used HDPE for the stone guide on the HoneDrill
                      ( http://www.gadgetbuilder.com/HoneDrill2.jpg ) I made and have been impressed with how it stands up in a grinding environment. In this application a carbide stone is slid back and forth by hand across the HDPE and there is little wear evident after considerable use.

                      It would be easy to try HDPE guides with Ishimura's design and if you don't like it another material could be substituted fairly easily without affecting other parts that interact with these guides.

                      Ishimura indicates the locking handles conflict with other items in some positions. Have you run into this too?

                      John
                      Last edited by GadgetBuilder; 07-29-2007, 12:14 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Hi John!

                        I'm in the process of squaring up a chunk of cast iron as we speak (man, a big ol' inserted facemill makes a mess cutting cast iron!) so I'm gonna try that for my table. I think it'll do pretty good. It's a little over 1/2" thick so it should provide a nice, rigid platform to grind from.

                        Note the small handles on the opposite end of the longer ones. I think they will allow me to position the fixed ends so that the interference he mentioned doesn't occur. I used 5/16" coarse threads on the pivot bolts and handles so a little less rotation of the handles will be required. (I hope) I won't really know until it's finished and bolted down and I'm adjusting it for my 1st tool grinding job. We'll see soon enough. If it doesn't work I can always put it on my desk at work and call it an objet d'art.

                        ps: My wife wandered in a little while ago and asked me what the heck I'm up to THIS time. She said it looked like I was just making a huge pile of black, gritty powder. I gathered up a handful of the iron chips, fired off a propane torch and dribbled the chips into the flame. The resulting sparkly light show was very cool. I told her I was getting ready for July 4, 2008 a little early.
                        Milton

                        "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                        "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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                        • #13
                          They make lever handles that have a spring loaded handle that is splined onto the shaft. You lift (or is it push?) the handle out (in?) to clear the splines and position as desired. Release and the splines engage to provide the necessary torque handling. I've got several of these in one of my goody boxes, and I think I saw them on McMaster.
                          Russ
                          Master Floor Sweeper

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                          • #14
                            Yup, my mill came with those on the table locks.

                            But I'd have to BUY them! I'm so tight, I take my glasses off when I'm not looking at somethin'.
                            Milton

                            "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                            "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Slick Plate is just an spray can version of LubriPlate, I looked at the Enco catologue and could not find it either, buts thats where I purchased it. Seems I always have difficulty finding specific items from Enco, their index sucks. Its in there somewhere. Its basically a sprayable mix of ghaphite, carrier, and a paint type base, works very well any where that a liquid, or greese type lub causes problems. Works even better if you let it cure for 24 hrs. and overcoat with a silicone spray....seems to prevent those stick slip issues.

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