Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Old water turbine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Old water turbine

    This is a water turbine of the ‘Fourneyron’ type, made in 1869 by MacAdam of Belfast. Originally installed at a paper mill in Catteshall, Surrey.

    The rotor is 11ft 9 inches diameter. It worked on a head of only 6ft of water, and developed about 50 HP at 25 rpm. The shaft would have stood vertically.

    The foundry moulders no doubt breathed a loud sigh of relief when all the sand was knocked away to reveal that all the numerous vanes in the casting were present and correct.






    100 years of wear evident on the bevel gear.


    Gear wheel. This type of construction was used for many steam engine flywheels. The wheel is ‘staked’ on to the shaft, the tapered keys/wedges being made to fit and driven in so that the wheel ran true. A wrought iron or steel collar is shrunk on over each side of the hub.

    Interestingly, the mill latterly became an engineering works, and amongst other things the turbine drove a large lathe made by Crookes Roberts & Co., which is now located in the excellent Kelham Island Industrial Museum in Sheffield. Lathe just visible in this photo:-
    http://www.simt.co.uk/kelham/index.html

    Unfortunately Kelham Island museum, home of the mighty working 12,000 HP steam rolling mill engine, was recently inundated by flooding.

    Back to the water turbine, it now resides at Ironbridge Gorge Museum. There’s a lot of industrial museumry to see in the Ironbridge/Coalbrookdale area, and visitors would be very strongly advised to buy a ‘Passport Ticket’ that gets you in to 10 museums in the area. I called in there en route to a job, so I couldn’t stay long. The water turbine bits were languishing alongside a building called ‘Enginuity’. With a name like that, I think you’ll guess that the inside of the building is no place for old curmudgeons. No information was on display about the turbine, and I’m indebted to an article by Mr Alan Crocker in ‘Industrial Archaeology’, November 2000, for the information.

  • #2
    Man, that's neat. Ever since I saw and researched water turbines for electric generators I have wanted one. Every time we moved I searched for land with a stream of the volume to support a water generator. Alas, I found none when we were in search of a new home place.

    I still drool over the thoughts of such a deal and bought some books for the design of such a thing. Well, this last purchase of land and building of home and shop precludes ever having a water generator.

    Bummer, total bummer.
    It's only ink and paper

    Comment


    • #3
      Neat. Kind of reminds me of the Knight Foundry and Machine Shop that was water powered. The official site is here: http://www.knightfoundry.org/index.html

      You can see a lot of photos taken when it was in operation here: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage...r?pp/hh:@FIELD

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the post. That big technology just amazes me. It also makes me feel pretty small when I can't pull of a simple project at home when these guys had so much less to work with and did so much more.

        I would have lived maybe 10 lifetimes and not coughed up the idea to use tapered shims to mount and center the wheel on the shaft !!
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been working on a turbine idea with a friend who has property out in the sticks. Problem is, he does not have enough flow. Can't get him any more power than he has ft-lb of energy coming downhill.

          That runner may have worked on 6 foot head, but it used one heck of a lot of flow, I'm betting.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            Does anyone know who owns the rights to the picture of the Fourneyron Turbine?

            Does anyone know who owns the rights to the picture of the Fourneyron Turbine. I am finishing a textbook on Renewable Energy and I need a picture of the Fourneyron. If you know who I could request the picture and send a formal request for permission to, please email me at [email protected]

            Thanks
            T Kissell















            Originally posted by Asquith View Post
            This is a water turbine of the ‘Fourneyron’ type, made in 1869 by MacAdam of Belfast. Originally installed at a paper mill in Catteshall, Surrey.

            The rotor is 11ft 9 inches diameter. It worked on a head of only 6ft of water, and developed about 50 HP at 25 rpm. The shaft would have stood vertically.

            The foundry moulders no doubt breathed a loud sigh of relief when all the sand was knocked away to reveal that all the numerous vanes in the casting were present and correct.






            100 years of wear evident on the bevel gear.


            Gear wheel. This type of construction was used for many steam engine flywheels. The wheel is ‘staked’ on to the shaft, the tapered keys/wedges being made to fit and driven in so that the wheel ran true. A wrought iron or steel collar is shrunk on over each side of the hub.

            Interestingly, the mill latterly became an engineering works, and amongst other things the turbine drove a large lathe made by Crookes Roberts & Co., which is now located in the excellent Kelham Island Industrial Museum in Sheffield. Lathe just visible in this photo:-
            http://www.simt.co.uk/kelham/index.html

            Unfortunately Kelham Island museum, home of the mighty working 12,000 HP steam rolling mill engine, was recently inundated by flooding.

            Back to the water turbine, it now resides at Ironbridge Gorge Museum. There’s a lot of industrial museumry to see in the Ironbridge/Coalbrookdale area, and visitors would be very strongly advised to buy a ‘Passport Ticket’ that gets you in to 10 museums in the area. I called in there en route to a job, so I couldn’t stay long. The water turbine bits were languishing alongside a building called ‘Enginuity’. With a name like that, I think you’ll guess that the inside of the building is no place for old curmudgeons. No information was on display about the turbine, and I’m indebted to an article by Mr Alan Crocker in ‘Industrial Archaeology’, November 2000, for the information.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Asquith
              I have enjoyed your post on the Fourneyron Turbine and this led to me doing a "Google" search for
              "Fourneyron Turbine" and found lots of info.

              Looking at the photo of the rotor and stator it took a minute or two to work out that the stator will be
              "Inside"of the rotor not a couple of metres apart as in the photo.

              Eric

              Comment


              • #8
                Eric,

                Thanks. Noting your pen name, I have to say how much I enjoy the sound of your motor bikes . The 500cc singles, not the ghostly Noddy Bikes.
                ................................
                T Kissell,

                I've sent you an e-mail.
                ................................

                Since the original post, I've had chance to see the biggish lathe in Sheffield, mentioned in Post #1. Photos of it in post #5 here:-

                http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...museum-229209/

                Comment


                • #9
                  That is one cool looking turbine - Im with JT on the fact that that baby took some volume to produce that much power with that little drop,

                  which also means it had to have a massive pre-strainer ahead of it because it would not be fun to clean out and would need it often as it's hardly a self cleaning devise -

                  man - bet some unlucky fishies got dizzy in that apparatus,,,

                  call me crazy but I would like something like that in my front yard...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you ever go to Death Valley go to Scottys Castle and take the under ground tour they have a water turbine that still works and turns a gen set . Kind of cool to turn on the valve and watch the meter start showing the volts being put out . They also have another that used to run the washing machine.
                    Richard

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      When I last visited Scotty's Castle in the early 50s, that genset was still running to power some of the lights.

                      Pops

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X