Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vertical Die Filer/Band Saw

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vertical Die Filer/Band Saw

    Has anyone converted a vertical die filer to a band saw. I have a chance to buy a Doall vertical die grinder and would want to use it as a band saw.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Sounds to me like it's a DoAll band saw with a file band on it. If so, it's just a matter of putting a blade on it.

    Joe

    Comment


    • #3
      First let me say that I do not know the answer to your question. A couple of things I would look into are the range of SFM rates the item supports. I suppose its range could be much smaller or much slower or faster than saw rates.

      The other question I would look into is whether the wheels are made the same....ie do they have a lip to control blade movement etc.

      I would also think that you may or may not have guides that are set up for a saw band. What might work for a saw band might be quickly destroyed with an abraisive band.

      I do think, however, that the DoAll band saw down stairs has abraisive belts listed in its big wheel-o-surface speeds guide that is attached. If you can look at or show details in pictures here of what you have, I would be happy to go downstairs and look at thier DoAll band saw for comparison.

      Paul
      Paul Carpenter
      Mapleton, IL

      Comment


      • #4
        I could understand converting a die filer to a hacksaw, but a "bandsaw"is a completely different design .I would like to see pics of the design you have in mind Alistair
        Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

        Comment


        • #5
          Allistair-- DoAll made what I think they actually called a band-filer that really just looks like a vertical band saw but took abraisive belts. The DoAll band saw down stairs (I just went and looked) lists one of these filing bands for use with various metals on its big round speed and feed wheel (a round guide for recommendations for cutting various materials). On this wheel you dial the material and it recommends the number of teeth for the band and the SFM rate which you can read on another dial as the unit is variable speed.

          It is not a die filer in the typical design that holds die files and moves them up and down in a reciprocal fashion.

          Paul
          Paul Carpenter
          Mapleton, IL

          Comment


          • #6
            Got you paul this is mine for example,Alistair
            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

            Comment


            • #7
              There really was (is?) a die filer that has a continuous band with short file sections riveted on just one end to the carrier band. At the working section they present a continous file but can "fan" out as they go around the wheels. The guides are different to provide a channel for the file sections and a backer like a belt sander, but I should thing that stuff could be changed and the fpm should be similar to the requirements for a saw band. I remember thinking they seemed to travel fairly slowly, but I know that's all relative.

              Jan
              .
              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

              Comment


              • #8
                Allistair-- if someone said "die filer" I would think more of something like you have, although perhaps less colorful

                That seems to be a pretty nice machine...and a nice find. I am guessing that there were not that many die filers around originally...and sadly that most of them have been melted by now.

                Paul
                Paul Carpenter
                Mapleton, IL

                Comment


                • #9
                  You Are Correct!

                  [QUOTE=Optics Curmudgeon]Sounds to me like it's a DoAll band saw with a file band on it. If so, it's just a matter of putting a blade on it.


                  You are exactly right! From across a room you would swear it is a vertical band saw. Only when you get close do you see that it has a band with file sections riveted to the band. SFPM is 50-300.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I changed a "continental band filer" to a band saw. The blade guides have to be changed. I also changed the motor from 1750 to 3450 to double the speed. At about 700fpm it still slow for a lot of material.
                    re
                    herm
                    Herm Williams

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There is also a "chain filer". I have one made by Grob. It sort of looks like a bandsaw but would be a huge amount of work to convert. I ran out of room in my shop, its been tarped in the yard for a few months. I think the scrapie is going to get it.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X