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  • "Little Job" cement mixer

    Rudy Kouhoupt's "Little Job" cement mixer was featured on the cover of the January 1996 issue of "Home Shop Machinist". I knew when I saw it that I had to have one.



    This view shows the yoke that supports the bucket. Milled from a solid block with shafts turned between centers, it's made me think that this CNC stuff might have some advantages after all.



    Tilted down to show how the load is dumped.



    This view shows the contrate gear that circles the bucket. The contrate gear is driven by a small pinion on the same shaft as the crowned pulley.



    This was my first venture into making "real" gears (and that was a major impetus for choosing this project). I used Chinese gear cutters purchased from Enco and they worked very nicely. However, the 90 tooth contrate gear was a real exercise in tedium. My neighbors commented on the emphatic "Yippee" when the last tooth formed completely and wasn't a half tooth.

    Although I'll probably never complete it, my idea is to incorporate the cement mixer into a steam powered bar set where it will make martinis rather than concrete (accompanied by a steam hammer to crack nuts and pit olives).
    Last edited by mklotz; 04-14-2013, 07:23 PM.
    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

    Location: LA, CA, USA

  • #2
    Very nice, and stuart has a very nice steam powered miniature hammer.
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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    • #3
      nice work Marv, looks great!
      .

      Comment


      • #4
        Nice work indeed. But, you had my hopes up when I saw the thread title. I need a real 'little job' cement mixer. I want to pour a slab in front of my garage next spring.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mklotz
          Although I'll probably never complete it, my idea is to incorporate the cement mixer into a steam powered bar set where it will make martinis rather than concrete (accompanied by a steam hammer to crack nuts and pit olives).
          If you take it to this next level, you'll have the best bar I've ever heard of.
          Last edited by aostling; 08-16-2007, 01:21 AM.
          Allan Ostling

          Phoenix, Arizona

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          • #6
            This board seems to keep raising the bar,,,,,,
            Evan i have a pdf of an old popular science,or mechanics article for small cement mixer it based on 10 gal , I got it from somewhere on the net ,, been so long i have forgot, if you are interested i'll send it to you,,,,,
            scariest thing to hear " I am from the government and i am here to help"

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            • #7
              Please do. My e-mail is in my profile. Use the "hsm" e-mail please.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

              Comment


              • #8
                10 gallon is going to be less than 5 gallon concrete, ie, less than 1 CF, so if you have a "patio" that is SMALL enough, go ahead, make it.

                27 batches to the yard.

                If you HAVE to go cheap, you might be better off with a 55 gal barrel with a clamp top. About 4 CF and all you gotta do is fill it up, roll it back and forth, take off the lid and pour it out.

                Just for the hell of it, price out the cement and the sand and the gravel, and see if you can mix it cheaper, and I do not include your labor.

                You might be surprised. The only downside is if you need 1 or 2 yards, you will pay, in the US, 4 yd minimum.

                Cheers,

                George

                Comment


                • #9
                  Brings back memories...
                  I spent a portion of one summer as a kid, feeding the full-sized model, allowing it to digest and then letting it puke out its guts into a small dump trailer to be transported to build manholes for a storm sewer. I didn't enjoy it.

                  The model is a pretty good representation of the real thing.
                  Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                  ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just for the hell of it, price out the cement and the sand and the gravel, and see if you can mix it cheaper, and I do not include your labor.

                    You might be surprised. The only downside is if you need 1 or 2 yards, you will pay, in the US, 4 yd minimum.
                    I doubt that I could handle dealing with the entire amount poured in one go. It's a two person job handling the screed board for a full pour and my wife and I both have physical disabilities that limit the amount of work we can do at one time. A small mixer will permit me to attack these type of projects in doable sized work units.

                    It might be a possibility if I can get one of our neighbours to help although I have to conside his limits too as he is quite a bit older then me.

                    There is also the matter of delivery cost as we live well out of town.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      Little Job cement mixer

                      Ah well,

                      Another description mis-stated.
                      Like Evan, I was looking East for a miracle to happen.
                      So it is back to the Spanish traditional square rubber tray/bucket and the gardening adze.

                      Is there a CNC program or is it just bloody hard graft in the real world?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mklotz
                        Although I'll probably never complete it, my idea is to incorporate the cement mixer into a steam powered bar set where it will make martinis rather than concrete (accompanied by a steam hammer to crack nuts and pit olives).


                        That thing is unique to say the least, the perfect conversation peice for getting drunk while its mixing more drinks,

                        maybe an oportunity for sterling power, you already have the ice on one side, just apply a small flame to the other, Here's a thought, if sterlings are capable of running on heat variation then maybe all you need is ice and room temp? wow ---- a self powered drink mixer? even as it sits its very "cool"

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                        • #13
                          I have one of those that was my Dad's. Craftsman, I believe,
                          with the cast iron frame, cast gears, but with wheels and a motor.

                          The wife and I reciently mixed some cement to re-do the sidewalk in places.
                          What fun, lifting those 80 pound bags into the mixer.

                          We as a family, worked, cementing the basement, and other areas of
                          a house built in 1772.

                          Dad claimed it was a hobby because of the blue laws in effect at the time.
                          To three small boys, it was hard work.

                          Pete did the gravel @three buckets, Paul, the sand @two buckets, and I carried the cement at one bucket per load.

                          I'm the baby of the family.

                          Dad, mixed, wheeled, and finished.

                          Those were the good old days!

                          I'll post a picture of the mixer tonight.

                          Thanks for the memories.

                          Kap

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                          • #14
                            here it is.

                            Here it is in all its beauty.








                            Kap

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