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  • Antique Machine Tools

    I was wondering if there was anyone interested in the collection, and restoration of antique metalworking machines.I have in my possesion several elderly lathes, mills, drill presses, etc.that I have used over the years, and have admired them for the quality and pride that was built into each one. Yet,as I look around, everyone seems to be preserving and collecting every item under the sun except for the machines that made them. Does
    anyone else have the same views?
    J.D. Leach
    http://thermionic.uuuq.com

  • #2
    I have several, very elderly machines with patent dates of 189x and several I'm not sure about but I'm sure they are in the early 1900's. I hope to restore each back it's orginal condition, including the paint color(if I can match the color...black). I plan on using them after restoration, as I don't want a shop of fullscale models, if they can't be used what's the point of having them.This will be a long term project
    rebuilding as I have the time and resources. I will probably continue to collect "orphans" as I run across them, since once they are gone they are gone. I am not interested selling them after restoration. Are you trying to find a home for these machines.

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    • #3
      Gentlemen, I am a "newbie" both to machining and to the acquisition and restoration of old tools, however, my Father has fallen heir to a benchtop engine lathe made by Lempco of Bedford (now Cincinnati) OH sometime in the 20's or 30's. I have searched several sites for info, including a thus-far unanswered e-mail to the current Lempco for any info on this veteran. Do either of you or any of our other readers have any info on this neat old machine? TIA, the Green Frog

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      • #4
        Hi I have an old sear's lathe and I get more enjoyment from playing with that at home the I do with a very expensive cnc at work, If you are looking for a home for one of your old machines I have a little room and some time to make it run like new or if you need help fixing it I'd be glad to give what advice I can have a good day

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        • #5
          Try looking at this site, it's a really neat site with probably the most information on old machinery of any I've found: http://www.lathes.co.uk/page21.html
          Unfortunately a lot of the info on old machines has been lost in the closing of shops and no one ever thought anyone would ever want it...so it got pitched. Some is surfacing from woodwork, but I'm afraid a lot is just gone.
          I don't really have any machines I want to let go, maybe if run across something in the future, I'll post it. There is a lot of pleasure from taking an old machine and brining it back to a useful life, anyone can go a piece of Chineese junk, but not everyone can restore an old machine.

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          • #6
            This might be of some interest

            http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cg...nery&number=11

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            • #7
              Thanks, D. Thomas,I went and took a glance and bookmarked the site. I don't have time tonite but I'll look it over good and probably addthat to my ever growing list of things to look at............when will ever find time to actually WORK on my machines?????

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              • #8
                To all the people who replied to my original post, thank you. It is heartening to know that there are a few people who are genuinely concerned with the loss of a part of our industrial heritage. I firmly believe that if enough of us get together, we could very possibly get an "antique machine tool collector" movement started.
                P.S.: I do not wish to part with any of the machines I have, they are such a part of my life and past, that I have given them names( my 9" Logan is called Ernie.)
                J.D. Leach
                http://thermionic.uuuq.com

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                • #9
                  J.D. I was browsing back through the past threads when I came across your post on old machine tools, like you I like older machine from a by-gone age, I have four old machines , an old hand operated planing machine from the early 1930/s , a three step cone drive back geared, screw cutting Colchester lathe from the late1920 early thirties era & a bigger geared head Holbrook tool room lathe from 1946 But I think the jewel in my crown is a pretty powerful six inch stroke slotting machine, by the Denham Engineering Co although a last war machine 1939-45 era it was built to a very traditional design
                  I forgot another machine which I unfortunately have never got round to setting up, a little bench mounted 4" centre height toolmakers lathe American in design, but sadly no makers name
                  Being a home craftsman, I am not beating the clock on machining times, Somehow the old machines have nicer flowing lines than todays machines , It may sound stupid but they almost have a soul, One can think on the past, forgotten craftsmen who earned their daily crust on these items of plant The little Colchester I own has a particular attachment to me, many moons ago at evening classes I was introduced to turning on the self same model of lathe, My particular lathe is still in mint condition. Enjoy your old machines they are a valuable link to a proud period when manufacturing reigned supreme

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                  • #10
                    So many neat things, so little space. I guess the closest I could come is my Chandler & Price 8 x 12 (printing press). The last patent date on its frame is 1897, so it was probable produced sometime between 1900 and 1910.
                    Kevin

                    More tools than sense.

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                    • #11
                      Interesting post. My oldest machine is a small 4x12 British built "WADE CVA" round bed lathe.
                      According to tony's lathe site these were last built in 1937. It is complete and Tony was surprised that i have all the change gears.

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                      • #12
                        I have a 9' Cincinnati planner from the very early 1900's, it a line shaft machine I'm planning to restore and use to resurface small (9" to 14") lathe beds.

                        BTW, don't let Fylo know what you have, he'll be beating down your door.

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                        • #13
                          Have a look at Old woodworking machinery website, they have a section for old metalworking machines, brilliant site, enthusiastic and helpful people.
                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            http://www.vintagemachinery.org

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                            • #15
                              Ahhh, come on guys, this thread is screaming for pictures, pictures, and more pictures.

                              And a video or two.
                              Paul A.

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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