Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Aint that the way.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Aint that the way.

    Well, it took all yesterday to get this thing off, and now more trouble.

    The truck has had an exaust leak that has been getting worse. The other day I noticed the smell of the exauset was getting into the cab. Which means that I have waited too long. Who knows how many brain cells have gotten burned by carbon monoxide that I didnt smell.

    So, I got off my but and pulled it apart. And of course, it was not simple. Started with removing the inner plastic wheelhouse. Pulled the other plastic covers off, started to remove the nuts off of the studs and found only 2 would come off. So it was off to Sears to get those rusty nut removers which work very well. Then, off came the other 5. Yes only 7 were removed. Then on #8 bolt, it happened. I nearly came unglued.

    Ford found that it was needed to cover this bolt with some un-needed chunk of metal from the motor mount. Thanks Ford, reason #5,438 why not to buy another. Reason #5,437 was the use of junk iron that has turned into a big ball of rust and created an exaust leak as it flaked off the bolts that held it all together.

    So, I unbolt the motor mount and jack the motor up. Ok, just enough room now to get the nut off.

    Ok, so I have the manifold off and on the mill. I milled down the old rusty studs that hold on the exaust collector. It is now ready for new studs. And while I'm at it, I'll replace the studs in the head. Mostly because thay are usless at this point from the rust. While I was out getting the studs, I pick up a cam style stud remover.

    To the point, all of the studs came out..... except for one. Upper left on number 8 cylinder. It broke off. Nice. Never did like using studs on exaust manifolds anyway.




    So today I will attempt to weld on a nut and give it another try. If that dont work, I'll be in the shop today making a drill jig to bolt on so that I can drill the darn thing out correctly and repair it.

    So much for a relaxing weekend, but I guess I was only kidding myslef thinking that I would relax. And, like always, I was thinking I should have sent this job off to the guys at the garage to fix it. Then they would have had to deal with this!

    Off to get dirty....

    Rock-
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

  • #2
    I seen the looks of your engine and then took a look at where your from, yup, back east, I remember working on cars in michigan before i moved out to colorado, I dont think i would have kept doing it back there, everything crumbles, it makes things 5 times harder when your constantly having to drill out broken bolts and studs plus the tools dont even fit the fasteners, 13mm are reduced to 11 and such, One of my most valuable tools out there was an air hammer with a sharp ass bit, dont even bother to loosen --- just hold air hammer bit on an angle to the nut and shear it off the stud,,,very frustrating, still happens a little out here with high temp stuff like exhausts and stuff, good luck.
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 09-02-2007, 10:37 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
      I seen the looks of your engine and then took a look at where your from, yup, back east
      I've never understood why the residents of northeastern states allow the local authorities to put salt on the roads. It can reduce a shiny new car to a rusted heap in just a few years. They don't do this in Montana, which gets a fair amount of snow.
      Allan Ostling

      Phoenix, Arizona

      Comment


      • #4
        The more people, the faster the snow and Ice needs to be gone, So the salt, calcium chloride, and the like , come out just to get folks to work and such.
        Happens in the midwest also, but not so much in the smaller towns.

        Comment


        • #5
          It is effective at keeping the roads clear.

          Here in Maine the State has started using Calcium Chloride only (I may have the wrong chemical). It works very well, but we're hearing of 3-4 year old cars with very rusty chassis, brake lines, etc. Combine the salt/chemicals, frost heaves and generally poor road conditions and you have a brutal environment for cars and trucks.

          I was shocked when I moved out here from the Seattle area. Out west you'd see a fair number of 30 year old cars still being used as daily drivers and weekend work trucks. Here a 15 year old vehicle is pretty much the limit. Cars and trucks just fall apart out here.

          Originally posted by aostling
          I've never understood why the residents of northeastern states allow the local authorities to put salt on the roads. It can reduce a shiny new car to a rusted heap in just a few years. They don't do this in Montana, which gets a fair amount of snow.
          Brett Jones...

          Comment


          • #6
            I used to see this problem all the time when I worked for chevy. Had a couple of ways of getting the studs out. First if enough stud was sticking out I have threaded drill guides, just screw on the guide drill a pilot hole. Then drill and tap from there. The second method I used was using a drill center in the exhaust manifold holes, works good as long as the manifold is not warped. And my last resort was to drill the holes free hand it's a little tricky to get the angle right but with a good angle drill and sharp bits its not too hard.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by aostling
              I've never understood why the residents of northeastern states allow the local authorities to put salt on the roads.
              Most likely because someone utterd the following phrase: "If it just saves one life it's worth it" That seems to be the mantra for most changes in society as long as the guy doing the uttering doesn't have to pay for it out of pocket. Here in New York we are well on our way to replacing steel guardrails with concrete ones. That might be why we have some of the highest taxes in the country.

              Originally posted by A.K.Boomer
              One of my most valuable tools out there was an air hammer with a sharp ass bit, dont even bother to loosen --- just hold air hammer bit on an angle to the nut and shear it off the stud,,,very frustrating, still happens a little out here with high temp stuff like exhausts and stuff, good luck.
              I use my little dremel with a cutoff wheel for a lot of that kind of work. Kind of like surgery !

              Rockrat, you remind of the guy who complained that they were gonna hang him with a new rope !! You got that beautiful new shop/garage with likely a beautiful concrete floor to work on and you're complaining !! Or is SWMBO gonna make you do the work in the driveway?
              Last edited by Your Old Dog; 09-02-2007, 03:29 PM.
              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
              Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

              It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

              Comment


              • #8
                Rock. Dodge 318 intake manifold pleneum gasket R&R. Started out Sat. Morning at about 8 AM. Finally got the manifold back on at 12:30 today. have to torque it down and hang everything else back on. You have my deepest sympathies, my friend. I am literally feeling your pain.

                Comment


                • #9
                  rusty everythingies,

                  This new to this area "Liquid Salt "crap they,re spraying on the highways to melt ice up here, is eating out the brake lines on 2-3 yr. old vehichles.

                  Stupid, Stupid, Ideas!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No ice VS No brakes?

                    I can drive on ice just fine, I let a little air out of my tires and slow way down is all.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a 1997 Ford F150. The cast iron exaust manifolds both rusted through and were replaced. Now one of the new ones has rusted through. I have been told they were cast in China. I had never heard of a exaust manifold rusting through before. Gary P. Hansen
                      In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Has anyone done any spark erosion using a welder for a power supply?

                        The one plans I had (borrowed by a engineer and gone) showed a vibrating etching pen used to stabilize the arc for the electrode.

                        A simple drop -feed device with something you could plug onto the stick welder would be divine around here. NOW the ability to rig it up to work on projects that come up real fast like this, even better.
                        Excuse me, I farted.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Drive in snow? Here in Ohio most people cannot drive in a little rain!
                          mark costello-Low speed steel

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It's not just up north...

                            ...exhaust bolts and studs rust solid here too and we don't salt nothin.

                            It's just the job they do in the conditions they do it in,hot and cold again,bolts don't hold temper,rust badly etc.

                            I've welded out thousands of them over the years. How the engine is running will effect how the exhaust bolts will come out.Lean and they are always stuck,rich not so bad.
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Exhaust leak

                              Good thing you got it fixed, sometimes I read the practical machinist board although I'm not a member, there was thread about wanting to use muffler tape to repair a 12" long hole in a muffler. I think the guy asking the question was the board owner and a metal working machinery dealer, you would think someone selling machine would know better, not sure if I would buy anything off him.
                              Non, je ne regrette rien.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X