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  • Turbocharger brakedown

    Here are som pic. from a charger on one of our carferrys. Had a major brakedown on it last weekend. Teared it down on monday, got new parts(retrofit) today wedensday. reassambled and tested this evenig and put in to service.The turbocharger sits on a + 2000 hp MWM mainengine. Sorry,pic. is from my cell.phone so the quality is not the best .

    This is the rotorassy. with the broken compressorwheel.

    Compressor outlet housing w/ the exhaust outlet behind it .

    Wornout rotor assy.

    New retrofit rotor assy.

    Only items we could use again from the original turbo was: Nozzle-ring w/cover-ring, exhaust inlet and outlet-casings. Bearings?: comes out when we drain down the oil!!

    crankshafter

  • #2
    geez, I bet that cost a few dollars. That's a bigger turbo than I ever had to replace on road trucks. I bet it made some interesting noises when it let go.
    It's only ink and paper

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    • #3
      Mind you it's beautifully made looks like it will be costly though, don't expect you'll get much change from a hundred dollar bilAlistair
      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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      • #4
        The engineer is still shakey. He was standing beside when the turbocarger goes orbit. I tell you there is some majore forces in a turbo turning some 20 thou. rev./min. The rotor assy. weights aprox. 130 lbs. Dia of the compr.wheel aprox.16".
        Tomorrow start assy. 1 of 4 Mitsubishi V12 mainengines on world's first LNG carferry.
        have to fdind my bed.
        crank......

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        • #5
          Speakin of turbines. Somewhere there's a photo of a China Air 747 with the turbofan held from turning by ....................seatbelts. Seems they flew it like that from China to Frankfort Germany. The Germans wisely grounded the plane.

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          • #6
            The bill: some 50 tou I think.

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            • #7
              Ahhh, just remembered past experiences. Did any of the turbo get into the intake? I remember a lot of engine damage on turbo failures.
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                now thats about the right size for a home made jet engine....................

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                • #9
                  luckily I just picked up some more JB-weld....

                  Ken.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by crancshafter
                    I tell you there is some majore forces in a turbo turning some 20 thou. rev./min. .....


                    Yup --- a far cry from that kamasaki 750 turbo i had to replace, all due respect though, i know its parts were way smaller but times the rpm's by ten, thats right 200,000 rpm's


                    hell ,there's ferrari's that spin 20,000 and they got rods and pistons attached to the crank

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Carld
                      Ahhh, just remembered past experiences. Did any of the turbo get into the intake? I remember a lot of engine damage on turbo failures.

                      Second that, very few systems run two air filters but should , one before and one after ----- the one after can be pretty crude - but it has to be sheltered from the "line of fire" otherwise particles will rip right through it, a simple 90 degree elbow wont due....

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                      • #12
                        Are you doing

                        Pre lube and coast down lubing ? If not, it will fail again.
                        Non, je ne regrette rien.

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                        • #13
                          carld.
                          "Ahhh, just remembered past experiences. Did any of the turbo get into the intake? I remember a lot of engine damage on turbo failures."

                          Luckily there is a charge-air cooler. stoping fragments coming in to the cylinders cranckshafter

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by chief
                            Pre lube and coast down lubing ? If not, it will fail again.
                            Every ship I've ever been on has detatched lube oil pumps. You start the pump, wait for pressure, then start the mains.
                            The lube oil pumps stay on all the time. The crankcase heaters are in-line with them, usually, to keep the engines warm and condensate free.

                            The turbos on the Pielstick 18V engines I worked on had a dedicated tachometer. At full engine power, a blistering 520 engine RPM, producing 9,000 HP, the turbo was spinning... 4,000 RPM.
                            --
                            Aaron

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                            • #15
                              Oil Pumps

                              Yes detached l/o pumps that may or may not start automatically depending the the set up but coast down l/o pumps need to be manually sarted, you don't to stop a main during a crankcase explosion only to have a l/o kick on to feed more oil into the engine. My cats and Jimmy had auto pre-lube pumps, coast down was operator controlled. Alco's FM, Whites and bessemers had Fireman Timmy on the hand pump for starting and stopping.
                              genset are another story, pre-lube every 12 hour in standby becasue you can't wait when you are dead,dark and stupid in the middle of the big pond.


                              Navy Diesel Inspector (retired)sw/swcc
                              Non, je ne regrette rien.

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