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  • broken off stud

    My son lives in Houston and can't find a shop that will remove a broken off stud in a exhaust manifold, anybody here from Houston that can provide a name?
    "four to tow, two to go"

  • #2
    Broken Stud Removal

    Originally posted by speedsport
    My son lives in Houston and can't find a shop that will remove a broken off stud in a exhaust manifold, anybody here from Houston that can provide a name?
    Hi,
    Have a welder hold a nut with vise grip pliers and weld through the center of the nut to the broken stud. When it cools down he should be able to remove it with a wrench or socket.
    Chuck

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    • #3
      Yep, done the "weld through the nut" trick many times. I've also just built up the broken bolt/stud enough to get vise grips on it. The sudden localized heat shock generally breaks loose even the most stubborn bolts, even exhaust manifold studs.
      Russ
      Master Floor Sweeper

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      • #4
        the stud is broken off past the surface, probably need EDM, the shops he has called not interested
        "four to tow, two to go"

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        • #5
          As big as Houston is there should be a shop that will drill it out. It's not that hard to do. They just have to want to do it. He needs to call more shops if no one here steps forward.
          It's only ink and paper

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          • #6
            I have used a cutting torch to blow right thru the stud, i have only needed it couple times and it worked both times,, perhaps a trip to muffler shop one of those guys may have done it in the past.
            scariest thing to hear " I am from the government and i am here to help"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by speedsport
              the stud is broken off past the surface, probably need EDM, the shops he has called not interested
              Nope, heat the stud, let cool, center drill it, hog it hard with a left hand drill and its out of there.

              Done it 1,000 times+ and charged big bucks.

              I say you owe me for telling the magic trick.

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              • #8
                The cutting torch trick only works on through holes. I've done it too, but you can easily wash out the threads. I've welded up With MIG even when below the surface, as long as it's not much.

                Left hand drill is convenient, but I've never had that much luck with them. If it's rusted out bad enough to twist off, then the drill generally doesnt work. Combined with enough heat, applied fast enough, it would probably work well though. When you weld up the broken stud enough to get a vise grip on it (or tack on a nut), it often comes as easy as if it were just put in with never-seize.
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  Try this. Take a center punch or transfer punch, and put a dimple in the rusted bolt as close as possible to the center of the bolt. Then, drill out the center of the bolt, and gradually increase the diameter of the drill until you approach the female threads. At that point, take a pick and begin picking the threads apart. Done properly, the threads will uncoil in almost a springlike fashion. It's a little tricky, but once the center of the bolt is drilled out, the rest of the bolt will collapse into the void quite easily, and there is no danger of damaging the threads. I've used this technique many times without ever damaging any of the female threads. It's a little more time consuming, but, if you dont have a torch, it's a safe way to "get er done", and you don't have to have someone else bail you out. Good luck.
                  If you have a properly sized transfer punch, it makes the job easier.
                  Last edited by Ed Tipton; 09-21-2007, 09:31 AM.
                  There is no shortage of experts, the trick is knowing which one to listen to!

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                  • #10
                    Drill the stud before heating or welding then if possible run a weld
                    along the side of the drill hole, this can usually be accomplished with a small sized rod, then weld on a nut or somthing similar. Have removed many broken
                    studs using this method.

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                    • #11
                      Better living through chemistery. Get an airesol can of MOPAR rust disolver from your local Chrysler parts counter. My local automotive machine shop has tried them all and uses it by the case.

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                      • #12
                        This tip is kinda like purchasing a burglar alarm system after the break in but for future references on the next stud it may help.

                        I had owned and operated an auto repair for over 30 years and an added exhaust shop for almost twenty. Plenty of bad experiences I can assure you. One trick I found was to heat up the stud area and stud red hot then quick cool it with lots of running water. This does a couple of things, hardens the stud and the quick cool breaks up the rust that wants to screw up your day. Start turning out the stud slowly and when you feel it break loose, stop, spray with penitrant, tighten just till it stops, and back out again, repeating this same cycle until it is free. I had a bunch of 3/8 studs that I kept with less than 1/8 remaining in the diameter using this method.

                        Ken

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                        • #13
                          Ken, when I was a diesel mechanic I used that method a lot for studs, bolts and pipe plugs in heads, etc. First I would try heating the stud, bolt, plug to as hot as posible without melting it. Then, with a squeeze bottle with a fine outlet, put water on the heated part untill cool then do as you did. Sometimes I had to reheat and heat the whole area and work the part out. Sometimes I had to heat it up warm enough to melt a candle into the threads to get it out. The candle wax trick works real good on pipe plugs but you need to heat the surrounding area rather than the plug so the wax can get into the threads.
                          It's only ink and paper

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                          • #14
                            Sometimes I had to reheat and heat the whole area and work the part out.

                            Carld,
                            Yes to that, had forgotten that this reheating was often necessary and there is no need to be re-heated so hot as Carld mentioned. If you do it only softens the bolt material.

                            One key asspect is do not get in a hurry, slowly loosen/re-tighten etc.

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                            • #15
                              hey at least it is iron, try stainless bolts snapped off in blind holes of alum. castings from salt water corrosion..(3 out of 6 darn it)..that is how i spent my saturday a weekend or 2 ago...trying to change a waterpump on a outboard lower end. thank god for TIG. came up with a bunch of new swear words...esp. the one bolt that snapped no less than 4 times in taking it out...every .25 inch out it would snap again.
                              scott
                              "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                              My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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