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Anybody know what this might be?

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  • Anybody know what this might be?

    I got this with my lathe a couple of years ago, and I've never really figured out what it is.





    more pics at: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v2...rking/Whatsit/

    The base is roughly 1 7/32" x 8" x 8". The hole through the center is a little bigger than 11/32". I think an "S" sized drill fits perfectly.

    I'm not sure if it's for workholding or possibly used to cut slots or something? That's a big hunk of stock that I might want to recycle for something. But, I don't want to destroy something if it is more valuable in its current form.

    Jim

  • #2
    looks like a security lock ..
    to lock a machine off ...
    oppertor would have the key ..

    all the best.mark

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    • #3
      Looks to me like its a can of wd-40 ... thats a common penetrating oil used to unstick stuck parts, remove light surface rust, prevent light rust, etc.



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      • #4
        Originally posted by Fasttrack
        Looks to me like its a can of wd-40 ... thats a common penetrating oil used to unstick stuck parts, remove light surface rust, prevent light rust, etc.




        Yeah, yeah--I *knew* somebody would come back with that response. . . . What can I say I'm the best straight man in the business!

        Jim

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
          looks like a security lock ..
          to lock a machine off ...
          oppertor would have the key ..

          all the best.mark
          Hmmm. . . . I'm not sure how that would work. The center part doesn't turn and the "pins" or "plungers" are sprung in the opposite way that a lock would be?

          Of course on the other hand it is big and heavy and would make it difficult to defeat if that was its intended purpose. . . .

          Jim

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          • #6
            It's a simple punch for making radial slots.

            There was probably a mating top part that came down, bearing on the chamfered end of the plunger pins to push them in and through the wall of the part.
            As it comes back up again, the spings would force the plungers/punches out to release the part.

            You'll notice that the punch blades are removeable for replacement or re-sharpening.

            Peter

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            • #7
              Looks like a die block for notching tubing for some specific application. I did say the top of some part... do to the lack of a waste hole. So cutting must of fell down tube out bottom which had some other op done to it. As for value.. when new 3-$500 to end user. Now just some nice heavy plate. So knock it down save all the bits for some later idea/use/project. That is unlees you'd like to notch some tubes... well that's my WAG at it.
              Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

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              • #8
                So, not much use to a HSM--well, other than the big chunks of steel.

                What's interesting to me is how *heavy* it is. The 1 7/32" thickness is way overbuilt. There is very little wear like this wasn't used very much.

                thanks,

                Jim

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                • #9
                  As a wag I would say that it is a part of a lock for a safe. Four bars would be pushed out when the door is locked. I have one similar but only three bars or plungers on a gun safe.
                  re
                  Herm Williams

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                  • #10
                    It looks like an Ion beam intensifier from the space craft found in the desert near Rosswell. You should turn it over to the FBI since you posted a photo in the internet. They will find you.
                    It's only ink and paper

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                    • #11
                      Its a flux capacitor prototype from 1942.

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                      • #12
                        Its a flux capacitor prototype from 1942.
                        I really doubt it. Flux capacitors are always triangular.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          I think Peter nailed it. It looks like a Fourslide die. If anyone has a Fourslide punch setup for small metal parts, I got a job for you.

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