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    Bguns
    Senior Member

  • Bguns
    replied
    Doesn't look like Armstrong uses that L or R after number system any more

    http://www.armstrongtools.com/catalo...sp?groupID=201

    PS Armstrong calls it a R hand tool also....
    Bguns
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Bguns; 12-06-2007, 09:57 AM.

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  • Lew Hartswick
    Senior Member

  • Lew Hartswick
    replied
    Allan. It makes sense if the cutoff is to get close to to the chuck it
    should have the same designation as the turning tool holder that
    does the same thing. ie. R . Yes?????
    ...lew...

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  • J. Randall
    Senior Member

  • J. Randall
    replied
    Carld, its to late to go out and look tonight, but I believe all of mine that will get you close to the chuck have an L on them . The ones that will get you close to tailstock have an R. I have always kept it straight in my head as being the direction you are going to cut. I will try and think to look tomorrow.
    James

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  • aostling
    Senior Member

  • aostling
    replied
    Originally posted by alcova
    It was explained to me this way, hold your hands in front of yourself and the way the wrist bends the easiest is how holders are named...ie left hand bends easiest to the right & right hand bends easiest to the left
    Just when I thought I had this subject mastered, I bought this Armstrong cut-off toolholder from eBay. I made a mistake -- it's the wrong size for my 6" Atlas. But the seller was not at fault.

    As you can see by the two toolholders in the foreground, Armstrong uses "R" and "L" after the part number to designate a right-hand or a left-hand toolholder. But the cut-off toolholder, which is left-hand, is labeled "R." Why?

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  • Carld
    Senior Member

  • Carld
    replied
    A straight tool holder can't get the tool bit right up to the chuck jaws. However, a right hand tool holder will place the tool bit near the chuck jaws. The same is true when turning toward the tailstock you need to use a left hand holder.

    Don't ponder over what they are called, just use what does the job.

    The tool bits are described the same as the holders are.

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  • darryl
    Senior Member

  • darryl
    replied
    Now you got us all standing if front of the lathe wiggling our hands.

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  • aostling
    Senior Member

  • aostling
    replied
    Originally posted by alcova
    It was explained to me this way, hold your hands in front of yourself and the way the wrist bends the easiest is how holders are named...ie left hand bends easiest to the right & right hand bends easiest to the left, so that goes along with BAD DOG's explanation
    alcova
    Thanks, this is just the sort of mnemonic I needed.

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  • alcova
    Senior Member

  • alcova
    replied
    It was explained to me this way, hold your hands in front of yourself and the way the wrist bends the easiest is how holders are named...ie left hand bends easiest to the right & right hand bends easiest to the left, so that goes along with BAD DOG's explanation

    alcova

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  • aostling
    Senior Member

  • aostling
    replied
    Originally posted by BadDog
    To me, it's just the side the tool starts on. Left hand tool starts on the left. Right hand tool starts on the right. No idea the original, but that's how I remember it.
    This makes sense. I'll try to remember it: "a left-cutting tool goes into a left-handed toolholder, which bends to the right."
    aostling
    Senior Member
    Last edited by aostling; 09-21-2007, 08:43 PM.

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  • BadDog
    Senior Member

  • BadDog
    replied
    To me, it's just the side the tool starts on. Left hand tool starts on the left. Right hand tool starts on the right. No idea the original, but that's how I remember it.

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • tattoomike68
    Guest replied
    Iv had to mill some super hard tool holders so they would fit to the job and not hit the spindle.

    I dont know the hardness but it was case hardend and done right. (inner steel was not soft)

    If you need to jig up a toolholder use a hot saw and eat it up , some dont machine easy if at all.

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  • aostling
    Senior Member

  • aostling
    started a topic toolholder handedness

    toolholder handedness

    How did the nomenclature for lathe toolholders get established? According to Machining Fundamentals (1995), by J.R. Walker:
    To tell the difference between right-hand and left-hand toolholders, hold the head of the tool in your hand and note the direction the shank points. The shank of the right-hand toolholder points to the right, the left-hand toolholder points to the left

    This would make sense if we typically picked up a toolholder by the head (bit) end, but since we don't, the nomenclature seems backwards. What's the rationale?
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