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For rookies only!

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  • For rookies only!

    For those of you (like me) who have never witnessed the process, here's a youtube video of a guy making a gear. It's useful to me because it shows several processes I've never been able to witness before such as how to use a broach and some exposure to the RT type turns counters.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHTXa...elated&search=
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    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

  • #2
    It looks like something a mortal could do.

    I had no idea the cutters had such a large diameter. The dividing head/rotary table on his mill rocked.

    Whats the device he's using at 1:15. It looks like he's mounted the gear on a mandrel, then put the mandrel between centers, and is turning it with an arm set into a flywheel? Why not just turn the mandrel directly?

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    • #3
      Hey that looks like something even I could do with the right equipment.
      I was wondering what to do when the broach went all the way through.
      I see he didn't show that.
      ...lew...

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      • #4
        Nice find YOD! I never really caught on how the sector arms worked. I guess I thought you still had to count holes every time, then set the sector arm, repeat ad nauseum. This clears all that up--a (moving) picture is worth at least a thousand words Sidegrinder

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
          Hey that looks like something even I could do with the right equipment.
          I was wondering what to do when the broach went all the way through.
          I see he didn't show that.
          ...lew...
          Lew, the teeth on the broach stop an inch or so from the top of the tool. Usually when the broach is pushed through and it is flush with top of the part the cutting action is over and you just pull the broach on through the bottom. If the keyway isn't deep enough a metal shim bent in the shape of an L is hung over the top of the part and the broach is run back through again.
          Jonathan P.

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          • #6
            Just so you don't learn BAD Terminology, it is;
            Diametral Pitch; Not Diametrical Pitch.
            (A rose by any other name). Good outcome thats what matters.

            Cheers,
            Les H.
            The Impossible Takes Just A Little Bit Longer!

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            • #7
              nice one, that video answered many questions esp. broaching. I take it that although the broach is tapered, it cuts a parallel keyway? Or are they only for the tapered gib head keys?

              Dave
              If it does'nt fit, hit it.
              https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
              http://www.davekearley.co.uk

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              • #8
                I didn't take a look at the video; but keyway broaches are tapered by design so that each tooth only cuts a few thousandths more than the previous one.

                Kevin

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                • #9
                  Dave, the broach has a mating bush with it, and the bush has an 'alignment' keyway/slot already cut into it.

                  In practice, you select a bush that will match the diameter of the hole you need to broach, insert this in the hole, and line up the broach with this keyway/slot.
                  The back (non-cutting) edge of the broach is guided by running against the back of this slot, and the tapered cutting edge on the front then 'shaves' slices of material off as it passes through, going progressively deeper with each tooth until the required size is reached.

                  Picture here: www.dumont.com/cat1.jpg

                  Peter

                  Edited to add: This is of course for keyway or slot broaches.
                  For broaching a shaped hole, the form is entirely on the broach and the guidance comes from the hole itself,
                  and from the form of the hole being created as the broach is pushed through.
                  Last edited by Peter N; 10-21-2007, 11:01 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Davek0974
                    nice one, that video answered many questions esp. broaching. I take it that although the broach is tapered, it cuts a parallel keyway? Or are they only for the tapered gib head keys?

                    Dave

                    It's tapered front to back, where the teeth are. each cutting tooth is progressively bigger than the proceeding one. Each tooth only taking off a little at a time. When the last tooth finishes cutting the keyway is nearly to size. A shim is then introduced and the broach is passed through again.

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                    • #11
                      Muy bien. If I knew what I was doing, which I don't, I could almost do it.

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                      • #12
                        Hi,

                        He forgot to measure his gear to see if it's right. But, gear calipers aren't very common in most tool boxes. http://www.drgears.com/gearterms/terms/toothvernier.htm

                        dalee
                        If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                        • #13
                          As always, the shop music is the important thing.

                          After seeing that, I have to conclude that Winifred Atwell playing the Bumble Boogie is the way to go when cutting gears.

                          A bit fast for me and my leisurely work habits, I'm afraid.

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                          • #14
                            I cant get this to work it shows a guy putting a bar into a set of jaws for a bandsaw then cuts out.Alistair
                            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
                              I cant get this to work it shows a guy putting a bar into a set of jaws for a bandsaw then cuts out.Alistair
                              Have you paid the electric bill and the broadband bill ?

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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