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  • Mister Issues

    I've had a Noga mister for a few months and have seen a gradual decline in it's adjustability. In the beginning I could set it for the occasional drop forming and then falling off the workpiece. Then it got to where it seemed like I was fooling with it all the time. Now it only does dry, intermittent, or fog the shop.

    When in intermittent mode I can flick the Loc-Line with a finger and get it to dump some juice, but it's awful hard to machine that way ....

    Naturally I took the little valve body apart. It's a relatively simple device. An adjustable depth plunger that slips into an O-ring to shut it off and that's about it. No problems there.

    What I can't get apart is the Loc-Line hose. There's a tube up the center for the air delivery and where the actual mixing takes place I can't tell. I suspect I've gotten it gradually plugged up in there along the way. Last night I tipped the tank to finish something up and it definitely took a turn for the worse.

    Anybody got a clue?

    SP

  • #2
    Originally posted by pntrbl
    What I can't get apart is the Loc-Line hose.
    I've mentioned before that I've got a Noga Mini-Cool that I use on a Bijur Spraymist system (pressurized coolant, so no fog).

    Loc-Line sells plastic pliers that spread the Loc-Line links apart. It costs $9 at MSC, Enco, ...
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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    • #3
      Thanx for the response Lazlo. I did some searching and turned up some excellent info you previously posted. I think I was in "too much computer" mode at the time and missed it!

      Time to re-engineer ....

      SP

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      • #4
        These are the Loc-line assembly/disassembly pliers I was talking about. They're a little more expensive than I remember: $14.63 at MSC, but I think they're usually on sale for ~$9 at Enco:

        http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...MT4NO=32463448

        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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        • #5
          ENCO has 'em for $12 and something Lazlo, but as usual I had to spend $50.

          Spotted a 4 1/2" hook and loop pad to mount Scotchbrite pads on my DeWalt angle grinder in their Hot Deals catalog. That'll sure make it easier to clean up the ways on the XLO I'm currently doing re-furb on. My skinny old arms are already happy ....

          On the mister I'm thinking to machine my own needle block to mount on the Noga mag base. Loc-Line out from there with one of their standard nozzles on the end? Seems like things might get fouled up in the Loc-Line tho.

          Any pics of what you guys have working good would be greatly appreciated ....

          SP

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          • #6
            I've found that the liquid in the tank tends to grow fuzz after a while. Probably needs cleaning out. At least, it's worth a look.
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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            • #7
              Be VERY careful of powered application of Scotchbrite pads. When driven by drill or grinder, they can and WILL remove more material than you ever guessed. A fair few intakes, and even heads, have been ruined (or close) by over aggressive use of those "surface prep" kits.

              I would use a razor blade to get most of it off, followed by chemicals, and then only apply scotchbrite by hand and with reasonably light (not delicate) touch.
              Russ
              Master Floor Sweeper

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BadDog
                Be VERY careful of powered application of Scotchbrite pads. When driven by drill or grinder, they can and WILL remove more material than you ever guessed.
                Now wait a second Russ! Several high-profile Ebay sellers make extensive use of powered Scotchbrite on their machine tools, so what's good for them has to be good for my machines, right?

                By the way, I've been amazed that a maroon Scotchbrite on a die grinder can actually make sparks fly...
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  Sure, you know those guys on ebay have our VERY best interests at heart. Surely they wouldn't use it to polish up a machine to enhance it's appearance if it would hurt the performance in non-visible ways, would they?
                  Russ
                  Master Floor Sweeper

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                  • #10
                    So no angle grinding with Scotchbrite on the ways ....... rats! LOL! Well I got some old brown chucks. I'll attack those.

                    SP

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