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  • just missed it

    I was too late to increase my bid on this really want one of these does anyone know where I can buy one or are they difficult to make.


    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...MEWA:IT&ih=015
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    I wouldn't think they would be too dificult. Just make sure the bars are parallel to one another and they are dead level. Another option might be a balancer that uses 2 discs at each end for the shaft to rest on.
    Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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    • #3
      I might be wrong, but it looks like theres bugger all that couldnt be made in a workshop one evening. you need a precision level to set it up, and a mandrel for the wheels.
      The 'rails' need to be level so the wheel can roll to its heaviest spot, but thats about it. the rest is upto personal preference as long as theres clearance for the wheel

      Dave

      edit:
      you could make a reasonable job using 4 bearings mounted so the mandrel can sit in the 'v' formed between them, no need to level the whole device then.
      Last edited by small.planes; 11-09-2007, 02:19 PM. Reason: had a thought
      Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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      • #4
        I was visiting a home-made gas turbine site one day and saw a clever way to balance the main turbine. Use a good piece of drill rod as an axle, no burs on the ends, and several inches long. Diameter is smaller by half of the bore in the wheel you're balancing. On that you put a collar/sleeve/tubing (which could be the inner race of a small bearing). Again, loose fit. Everything needs to be able to move freely. Onto that race you put the wheel to be balanced, and you then put the length of drill rod on a granite surface plate so the wheel and race are over the edge and free to move.

        Then you roll the drill rod back and forth. As you do so the heavy part of the wheel will move to the bottom. Now you remove material (from both faces of the wheel) and repeat. At the end, the wheel will show no tendency to rotate as there's no longer a heavy side.

        Most of us probably have everything needed in the shop to do this.

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        • #5
          Could someone explain exactly how these work ,as I have used them before and it was along long time ago and now I don't exactly remember the exact sequence of events. Alistair
          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
            Could someone explain exactly how these work ,as I have used them before and it was along long time ago and now I don't exactly remember the exact sequence of events. Alistair
            Gravity.................



            .
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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            • #7
              You missed:
              Put wheel on arbour, place on rails.
              THEN gravity

              Dave
              Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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              • #8
                yes but how do you get the wheel permanently balanced? also is this any good or is it no good ?Alistair


                http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...MEWA:IT&ih=010
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #9
                  Alistair,

                  i wrote this up a few years ago on how i used mine

                  http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=12741

                  at the begining is a link to a diy version. too bad you missed that ebay one
                  .

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                  • #10
                    if you dont have grinding wheels with an adjustable weighted arbour in the middle of them ...its no use to you at all .

                    think ive heard that they are for grinding wheels larger than 10 inches mainly

                    that went very cheap ......you could of made on that one .

                    all the best.mark

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                    • #11
                      I've made adjustable hubs for my old POS grider that now runs wire brushes. Wire brushes, particularly coarse knotted ones, are often horrendously out of ballance. So I made some shims like McGyver, only out of 1/8" strap stock with much heavier offset. I ballance them right on the spindle, and it makes a HUGE difference.
                      Russ
                      Master Floor Sweeper

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                      • #12
                        Alistair,
                        I'll dig mine out in the mornig and take a couple of pics if you don't laugh. It was cobbled together in about 1/2 hour as the previous one I had couldn't handle a 16" diameter wheel by 4" wide and I wanted to balance a cutter block for a pencil sharpener.

                        Here's half of it.



                        And here's the whole block at 8" wide.



                        You can see the balance holes in the rim.

                        They need to be well balanced as they run at 5,200 rpm.

                        .
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          grinding wheel balancing unit

                          Oneway a Canadian co makes one for about $60 US. Oneway sells lathes and accessories for wood turners. All made in Canada and of excellent quality. Peter

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                          • #14
                            John,

                            I'd certainly like to see your balancing jig.

                            Is it static (like the one Alistair was looking at) or roller-bearing based, like the Anderson Balancing Ways?

                            Thanks,

                            Robert
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lazlo
                              John,

                              I'd certainly like to see your balancing jig.

                              Is it static (like the one Alistair was looking at) or roller-bearing based, like the Anderson Balancing Ways?

                              Thanks,

                              Robert
                              the heck with the jig, i want to see the pencil he's sharpening!!!!!

                              andy b.
                              The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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