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Should I buy this?(turret lathe)

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  • Should I buy this?(turret lathe)

    I'm buying another item from this guy and I'm wondering if I should throw this into the mix. Made in Germany...looks like a handy little turret machine but I'm not sure what one would expect to find for tooling etc. for this machine.
    thanks!
    Russ
    http://cgi.ebay.ca/lathe-collett_W0Q...QQcmdZViewItem
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Well, I don't think I'd find much use for it, but if you want to make a couple hundred "screw machine parts" on a regular basis it might be just the thing. I think I'd save my money and shop space for something more generally useful...but that's just me. If you want it, go for it!

    Presumably the holes in the turret are some standard size, presumably metric. I doubt you'd find much ready-made tooling for it, but it shouldn't be too difficult to make appropriate shanks for whatever you want to mount.

    The lever cross slide similarly ought to be readily adaptable even if you can't find anything specifically for it.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
    Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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    • #3
      SGW..Thanks! I'm just thinking...it's a nice compact unit that should go cheap. My gurl helper has stood in front of my other lathe for quite awhile in the past few weeks doing things that would be quicker on this little machine.
      I can buy this cheaper than I can a tailstock turret for my bigger machine.
      Russ
      I have tools I don't even know I own...

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      • #4
        You would be happier with this one. except for the add ons,JackA$$ owner.IMHO

        http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEWA:IT&ih=013

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        • #5
          Nice machine Jay...but a looong ways from here.
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

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          • #6
            It would pay for itself in a Year,even with shipping it up there,Mine paid for Itself in 3 months (first Job),working part time, at my cheap hourly rates.

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            • #7
              Yessssssssssss.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                If you have the work and space for it, absolutely.


                Am I missing something here, look at the price of this pretty simple looking lathe
                http://cgi.ebay.com/Cue-Monster-CNC-...QQcmdZViewItem

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                • #9
                  mo...yup you missed something...you get $25 back if you use MC
                  Umm...that's just a leeeetle steep for that lathe huh?
                  I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                  • #10
                    Its an interesting looking machine and very solid --- the price is right if the critical things are good but what about tooling? Its most likely going to be oddball ------ The thing that strikes me is I remember looking at just about everything when I was looking for a used mill and Now that you brought this up I dont recall ever seeing anything from germany, never gave it much thought till right now, seen about everything else from everywhere but there and now I wonder why ----------- I do remember losing a bid on a very nice rotory table that was made in W. germany, It really broke my heart because it was a beautiful very precision looking piece, it was MM's but was close to 8"
                    Now I cant even remember the name but it was something like Haufman -

                    If I was wealthy I think I would get different machines from all around the world, To help me work on all the different exotic cars Id buy

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by torker
                      mo...yup you missed something...you get $25 back if you use MC
                      Umm...that's just a leeeetle steep for that lathe huh?
                      here is their site http://www.cuemonster.com/cnc_machine, I guess with the extras it is probably worth it to someone that just wants to make cues, still I would be tempted to make my own, and I wouldnt use Bobcrap 17

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                      • #12
                        Russ

                        When you go to Edmonton to pick it up, stop by for a cup of coffee on the way by....

                        BTW, there's prolly enough tooling stores in Edmonton you could do your tooling for cheap. Our local industries are a bit slow right now The good news is the dealers may be willing to haggle.

                        Cam
                        Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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                        • #13
                          The lathe looks much like one that I ran around 24 years ago. It was of European origin either West German, Austrian or Swiss not sure which at this point, but more importantly, it took 5C collets and used 3/4" shank turret tools. Those holes look a little smaller, so I would guess they would be 5/8". another common turret tool shank. Since it appears to be an older copy of our Hardinge DSM59 I would think that the important parts would be sized in SAE standards for import to the North American market. Turret lathe tooling is plentiful and cheap on eBay, and can also be order new from many of the usual suspects.The thing that would kill the deal for me would be the spindle tooling. If it is not one of the common types like the afore mentioned 5C then you could be looking at large bucks for each collet. From the pictures, it looks like it should be 5C. It has both tool posts for the cross slide ,but seems to be missing the stop screws on the turret for setting each tools work length. If they are of a common thread no problem just some all thread and stop nuts, if not then have fun.

                          You can make a lot of money with that machine, either by running batchs of parts bid for the lathe,or just by saving time doing secondary opperations on your normal parts. You are also freeing up your larger lathe to do more work at the same time.

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                          • #14
                            5001 RPM?
                            What on earth would you need that speed for?I think I would like to be outside the building when that is running!
                            Hans

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by matador
                              5001 RPM?
                              What on earth would you need that speed for?I think I would like to be outside the building when that is running!
                              Sounds about right for a wooden cue, we used to run some copy lathes that could go to 7,500.

                              Not certain how this one operates but remember that most wood copy lathes have their tooling mounted behind a cathead type steady to support the work and prevent whipping.

                              Ever seen those very long slender Victorian stair spindle?, not the modern chunky ones done on modern copy lathes and wondered how they were done ?

                              Well when I wanted some new spindles to replace the old damaged ones in this house that have been paneled in for 50 years I asked the wood turning shop I was manager of to make me some new ones, after all if they could make baseball bats to sell on the local markets whilst I wasn't supposed to be looking then surly they could make me 7 spindles to pattern.?

                              No apparently not, every time they tried to run these they would get spat out the machine as they were too thin for the length.
                              Making inquiries I found out that the old lathes use the tailstock to pull not push so the wood was in tension and not compression.

                              So two pieces of angle iron with nails drill thru were hammered onto the new spindles and secured with hose clips. Each end was jury rigged to the headstock and tailstock and away they went and we got 10 new spindles to refurbish out staircase originally built in 1901.

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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