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  • OT/ Any water well guys here?

    I need some advice on my current water well situation. I knew before I bought this place that it'd need taking care of one day so I'm feeling out what is best to do now.
    The original well casing is (yuk) a 35 foot culvert that's 12" in diameter.
    For pretty much the bottom half it's just gross....rust flaking off and falling in the water and god knows what else from the galvanized coating.
    What I'm thinking is to drop a 10" diameter PVC pipe down the hole to seal the water off from all the crap in the original pipe.
    Can anyone see a problem with this?
    Thanks!
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    nope , but the water will still have a lot iron in it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Russ,

      Should work just fine. Something similar is done on oil wells to repair corroded & leaking casings (although we use steel, not plastic). Maybe you could make up some kind of collar - a plastic ring or similar - for the bottom of the plastic liner that's just smaller than the bore of the existing steel casing. Once in place, the collar should catch most of the bits of rust that fall down and after a while, it should pretty much seal itself off.

      For a better seal, maybe pump a suspension of bentonite into the annulus - it'll drop out over time and swell, which should be the end of the rust falling down.

      hth,

      Ian
      All of the gear, no idea...

      Comment


      • #4
        While we're on water wells........

        Couple wks ago I replaced the 20 or so year old bladder type tank on my deep well, and while into it, replaced all the plumbing from well to entrance in ground to house with schedule 40 pvc, pressure switch, guage, valves, etc, The pressure switch was defaulted at 20psi off and 40 on.... As we all know any plumbing fixures bought now are greatly restricted on water flow for conservation, and a few months ago I had replaced the kitchen faucet and it was pretty bad,-- could take a short nap filling the coffee pot! So, I cranked the pressure sw up to 40/60psi and gained a pretty nice increase in flow---though I am wondering if I might get maybe 10psi more out of it? Whats an acceptable limit/range on this type system?

        Actually, Russ, that doesnt sound all that different from the way they put water wells in around here -- drill the hole, poke the 150-200ft of 4" pvc in and fill around the sides with cement (little bit simplified, but thats it basically)
        If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

        Comment


        • #5
          all i know is

          what you do get when you turn the pressure up, is an increase in wear of the tap (faucet) washers.

          also any header tank with ball valve is liable to increase in wear ...and decrease in service life .

          and banging pipes every time you turn them off.


          also ....trouble controlling hot and cold supply to washing machines...eg ...when it progs hot and cold to go in together ...if you hots on gravity the cold will overwhelm it.

          same goes for showers ...

          i probably only have something like 15 psi here ...and it meets all my needs.

          all the best.mark

          Comment


          • #6
            40/60 should be fine and is recommended if you have a water softener. I wouldn't try to raise it more as it puts a heavy load on the pump which will be reflected in the electricity bill, at the least.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bill Pace
              While we're on water wells........

              Couple wks ago I replaced the 20 or so year old bladder type tank on my deep well, and while into it, replaced all the plumbing from well to entrance in ground to house with schedule 40 pvc, pressure switch, guage, valves, etc, The pressure switch was defaulted at 20psi off and 40 on.... As we all know any plumbing fixures bought now are greatly restricted on water flow for conservation, and a few months ago I had replaced the kitchen faucet and it was pretty bad,-- could take a short nap filling the coffee pot! So, I cranked the pressure sw up to 40/60psi and gained a pretty nice increase in flow---though I am wondering if I might get maybe 10psi more out of it? Whats an acceptable limit/range on this type system?

              )
              Usually around here folks upgrade to a larger tank,but also opt for a pressure switch with an adjustable differential.Doing that you can have it switch on at 35 and off at 45.That coupled with the larger tank means you get a larger volume of water in the 35-40 psi band without the pump cycling on and off frequently.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by torker
                I need some advice on my current water well situation. I knew before I bought this place that it'd need taking care of one day so I'm feeling out what is best to do now.
                The original well casing is (yuk) a 35 foot culvert that's 12" in diameter.
                For pretty much the bottom half it's just gross....rust flaking off and falling in the water and god knows what else from the galvanized coating.
                What I'm thinking is to drop a 10" diameter PVC pipe down the hole to seal the water off from all the crap in the original pipe.
                Can anyone see a problem with this?
                Thanks!
                Russ
                Our well guys here use a stickey cement product that they mould onto the end of the liner before they drop it down,once the stuff hits water or at least gets moist it expands and fills the voids.At that point you can fill it with bentonite and cap the top with hydraulic cement.

                You might consider getting your water tested,here it costs $80 for a detailed anylisis that tells you what the exact mineral content,oxygen level and biological content is.From there you can get a whole house filtration system that will improve things greatly.

                I'm on community water here,but I still run a filter.A whole hose for sediment(protects appliances from silt and sand) and a carbon block filter at the drinking taps to get rid of the chlorine taste.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

                Comment


                • #9
                  We use rain water in a cistern with a pump set at 40 psi with differential of 10 psi and it works fine.

                  As to the liner, I think it's a good idea but sealing off the well water from the old liner without drilling deeper is wishfull thinking. Without a perfect seal the water will always be contaminated by the old liner and even drilling deeper is no guarantee of a seal.

                  If you drill deeper and are able to succesfully put a sealing material such as expanding styrafom around the bottom of the old liner it MAY form a good seal. Maybe.
                  It's only ink and paper

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Carl...drilling deeper is an ugly option. The whole hill was pushed down with a D-8 long after the well was drilled (or hand dug...that's a big culvert) and to get a well drilling rig anywhere near the well now would be almost impossible.
                    If the liner was at least pounded into the top silt a foot or so it'd be a heck of a lot better than it is now. Any kind of sealer in the bottom would also help. I'm sure you'd never get rid of every spec of iron, etc. but it'd have to be worlds better.
                    Thanks guys!
                    Russ
                    I have tools I don't even know I own...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Maybe driving the new liner in some would work. Over time dirt, etc, may settle and seal it.

                      Maybe you can pump the bentonite to the bottom to seal it. It needs to be at the bottom.
                      It's only ink and paper

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I better ask...what is bentonite? And where would you get that at?
                        Thanks!
                        I have tools I don't even know I own...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Russ,

                          Bentonite is a montmorillonite clay used by the ton in drilling operations. It swells up in water, making it an excellent sealing agent (hence its use in drilling mud). I think it's household name is fuller's earth. Maybe these guys can supply it:
                          http://www.baroididp.com/baroid_idp_...od_benseal.asp

                          Ian
                          All of the gear, no idea...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here are some thoughts on your situation based on our experience with our well. We have a drilled casing, 35 feet deep. Plenty of water coming off a mountain range here in Montana - and, we thought it was "mountain pure". Not so.

                            After living here for about ten years, some time ago we decided to refinance our place, to take advantage of lower rates. That's when things got complicated. The bank wanted a water test - no problem, we thought. It was a simple bacteria test - and, what we found was a higher than normal concentration of coliform. A real surprise.

                            So, we called the county health department and found that it was not all that uncommon to have bacteria concentrations in unsealed well casings. We thought our well was sealed, but the upper cap on the casing was just resting on the pipe. Apparently any opening in an unsealed well casing allows for insects (other critters) to enter the pipe and they will cause the bacteria build up.

                            So, here's what we did: First, we dumped about a gallon of chlorox in the pipe casing, letting it run down the sides . We then opened all valves to let the faucets run until we could smell the chlorox. We then let it sit for about 12 hours. After putting the chlorox in the pipe we installed a pipe cap with an o-ring seal so that the pipe is sealed from anything getting in. After the 12 hour soak time, we opened all the valves (farthest one first) and let the water run until we couldn't smell chlorox - that took some time.

                            Lesson learned: your water quality can be heavily impacted by your well casing design and condition. If in doubt run a water quality test, a relatively cheap process (~ $50 locally for bacteria). BUT, depending on where you live, you may also want to include a test for heavy metals, hydrocarbons and fertilizers - all of which can be very toxic. When we buy a house we always require a full test of the water for all toxins. Frequently, you can find herbicides and pesticide build up in rural areas due to farming operations.

                            The only way you can tell if you have a water quality problem is test a sample.

                            Hope this helps.

                            Bob
                            _________________
                            In the west: whiskey's for drink'in, water's for fight'in!
                            Bob J

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                            • #15
                              Russ,

                              You can probably buy a couple of sacks of bentonite from a local vinyard. They use it for filtering the wine.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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