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  • OT slightly as is a car modifaction

    This site has some history on the elusive 1973 shell oil company test car that got 376 miles per gallon. With pictures wasn't much on comfort but would have turned heads while you are driving it.
    http://www.race-cardrivers.com/Shell%20Opel.htm
    And to think this was sitting at Talledega's track hall of fame
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  • #2
    From the page it looks like the writer(s) are some of the ones that still believe that whole "200 MPG carburetor being suppressed by the Oil Industry" types.

    One doesn't have to be an automotive engineer to see that's not a "car", it's a "go-kart". Stripped down to minimum weight (plastic windows, no suspension, no firewall/front bulkhead, one fiberglass bucket seat, no transmission, etc.) and run on a hot-cycle engine.

    Smokey Yunick experimented with the same thing- and a bit better- only a few years later, and while it worked, to an extent, the materials wouldn't hold up, and wasn't necessarily an economical system.

    This Opel is simply an older version of the mileage-test cars; the ones where they streamline them, run tiny motors, and use burn-and-coast techniques to get mileages equivalent to 800MPG or better. (What's the record- something like 2,000MPG?)

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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    • #3
      Hmm, sounds like the "Pogue" carbie
      Just got my head together
      now my body's falling apart

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      • #4
        I got better than 40 mpg out of a 1980 Chevy painter van. Honest. All ya gotta do is run out of gas at 7000 ft!

        SP

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        • #5
          what's all the insulation about

          is that part of the secret ...
          that is to run the engine at a very high temperature.

          all the best.mark

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          • #6
            hmmmm
            had a think

            cars that run lean over heat ...ok


            this cars running so lean that its not making hardly any heat ...hence the insulation.

            what do you think

            yeah...

            maybe that is the secret ...very little fuel ...and lots of insulation to keep the thing running .

            bet the car doesnt have a radiator....cant see one in the pictures

            all the best.mark
            Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 11-29-2007, 07:47 PM.

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            • #7
              The part I liked if for nothing else, is that they had something that did get the mileage, and it was once a real car but highly modified. I know somebody that claims it could never happen. so printing it out in copies and giving to everybody around next time I see him will be a hoot.
              Glen
              Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
              I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
              All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

              Comment


              • #8
                yeah everyone goes on about to sustain combustion you got to have fuel air ratio between certain values ..

                hence not possible to run engine below those values

                bet the neigh sayers have only done the calcs oin a normal engine ...not a heavily insulted one.,.

                worth thinking about ...me thinks ..

                all the best.markj

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                • #9
                  Car

                  I remember the high mileage vehicle as I was employeed by the Shell Research Lab at Wood River, Illinois at the time. The "Mileage Marathon" was an annual event for the employees of the facility.

                  JRW

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PTSideshow
                    The part I liked if for nothing else, is that they had something that did get the mileage, and it was once a real car but highly modified. I know somebody that claims it could never happen. so printing it out in copies and giving to everybody around next time I see him will be a hoot.
                    well the only way these days they get them figures are in a plastic stream lined dustbin (trash-can)...with a 25cc engine ....doing 2 mph...with every gizmo under the sun on it ...and the driver lieing down!!!.

                    All the best.markj

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J. R. Williams
                      I remember the high mileage vehicle as I was employeed by the Shell Research Lab at Wood River, Illinois at the time. The "Mileage Marathon" was an annual event for the employees of the facility.

                      JRW
                      I would like to know some details of how the test was conducted.

                      Can you fill us in?

                      One thing I'd like to know is, did the thing actually travel that distance, or was that a calculated mileage from the amount of fuel it used before it seized up?
                      Gene

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                        what's all the insulation about
                        is that part of the secret ... that is to run the engine at a very high temperature.
                        -Sort of. Google "Smokey Yunick" and "Adiabatic engine". That's what I referred to when I said the materials couldn't hold up- the engine and combustion temps were too high. (At least, for off-the-shelf aluminum/silicon pistons and cast-iron or aluminum heads and blocks. Exotic alloys could hande the heat just fine, but wouldn't have been economical for a mass-production car.)

                        bet the car doesnt have a radiator....cant see one in the pictures[.]
                        -It's on the right, you can see the radiator cap. It's just covered with that rock-wool insulation. I'm not sure what to make of that insulated passage from the center of the radiator to what looks like the lifter cover, though.

                        I'm also not sure what to make of that thing that looks like a minibike carburetor hooked to the top of the valve cover. Does the air pass through the engine block first?

                        The part I liked if for nothing else, is that they had something that did get the mileage, and it was once a real car but highly modified. I know somebody that claims it could never happen. so printing it out in copies and giving to everybody around next time I see him will be a hoot.
                        -It was a "real car" in the same sense that dragsters and NASCAR racers are "real cars".

                        Shell has sponsored a "Mileage Marathon" (now called the Eco-Marathon) for decades- according to that page, it started in 1939. The point is, quite simply, to move a car as far as possible on the least fuel.

                        The current record holder is the Pac-Car, with over 12,600 MPG. Yes, over twelve thousand miles per gallon.

                        Problem is, it's hardly what you'd call a "real car", and it wasn't driven in anything even close to resembling "normal driving conditions".

                        Ditto this Opel- it's a test car, a specialty project for a specific purpose, made for the same Shell Mileage Marathon program.

                        Those "somebodys" that probably say that an average streetable car driven under normal driving conditions, can't reach those sorts of mileages, are absolutely correct. Printing that page out and "shoving it in their face" as a counter, is about as logical as printing out a photo of Kenny Bernstein breaking 300MPH in a Top Fuel funnycar as proof that a showroom-stock Corvette can break 250MPH.

                        bet the neigh sayers have only done the calcs oin a normal engine ...not a heavily insulted one.,.
                        -Just insulating it does no good. Smokey got at least two patents out of his idea, and it has less to do with insulation and more to do with directing the heat where it needs to go.

                        There's also a limit to how hot you can combust gasoline and diesel, so yes, chances are the "nay sayers" have indeed only done calcs for realworld conditions. One doesn't design a car around the old engineering classroom bit "first, assume friction is zero..."

                        well the only way these days they get them figures are in a plastic stream lined dustbin (trash-can)...with a 25cc engine ....doing 2 mph...with every gizmo under the sun on it ...and the driver lieing down!!!.
                        -Pretty much. I think there's a stipulation as to average speed required, but what they do is coast-and-burn: Run the engine for a few minutes, and get the car up to say 50 MPH. Then shut the motor off and coast 'til it slows down to 20 MPH, then restart and get back up to speed. The average speed is therefore about 30MPH, but the engine's only run for half the time.

                        Popular Science had an article about this Marathon years ago, and one of the top finishers was using a 1.2cc model airplane engine, in a bicycle-wheeled streamliner built much like a model airplane- a stick frame with a heat-shrunk plastic "skin".

                        Sure, they got something like 2,000 MPG, but that's hardly what you'd call a "real" car.

                        Doc.
                        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by topct
                          I would like to know some details of how the test was conducted.

                          Can you fill us in?

                          One thing I'd like to know is, did the thing actually travel that distance, or was that a calculated mileage from the amount of fuel it used before it seized up?
                          -Details are in the Eco-Marathon link above. The Pac-Car, for example, used 1 gram of hydrogen in a fuel cell to travel a certain distance, which was calculated to equal that theoretical gas mileage.

                          Remember, these cars are specialized test vehicles- they use all sorts of tricks that can't or won't work on the highway. The Pac-Car's 0.008% drag tires, for example, aren't exactly what you'd want if it rained a bit on that twisty mountain raod.

                          Doc.
                          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My opinion, too many of those mileage contests are a waste of time.

                            I think if they listed 'street legal' and highway driveable as a requirement, you'd see real world benefits.

                            Ken.

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