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  • Fred_M
    replied
    Lubrication

    Thanks for all the input guys. - Fred.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Sometimes its a good thing to say "piss on the manufacturer" Iv found that out with many many manufactured things... and if you like to modify and or use things differently than what they were designed for its an absolute must.

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  • thistle
    replied
    not if the manufacturer says light weight hydraulic oil, then only light weight hydraulic oil will do .

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Joel is correct any good quality oil will do .Alistair

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  • macona
    replied
    Spindle oil is usually a 10Wt oil. Either that or ATF ought to do fine. You should have spindle oil for you mills spindle unless it has sealed bearings.

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  • thistle
    replied
    by lightwieght hydraulic they probably mean an ISO 22 or 32 oil, on the left hand column.

    the 30 wt oil compressor oil would be my choice over gear lube, but ideally you should try anf get some hydraulic oil.

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  • thistle
    replied

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Big difference between a superior slippery lubricant or a High Tack high viscosity one with lots of body, For instance, what you want in your car engine is not what you want on a milling machine or lathe or R/T table, The two surfaces that are involved actually work in the same way that a viscous coupling does, "generally" the higher the viscosity index the more resistance it takes to "shear" the two parts from each other -- even though there is no metal to metal contact,,, also -- the time frame in which the "shearing" effect happens is directly related to the amount of resistance aplied, this can be Ideal for keeping fore and aft movement to a minimum (if thats your intentions) and can even be dialed in to certain wt.'s to correspond better to certain frequencies... Take some Vactra #2 and put it between your fingers and then pull them apart --- The stuff is "gummy" this is the cushion im talking about, it takes lots of effort to "shear" it also, Yet its also keeping the parts away from each other...

    On the flip side, throw some Vactra (or 90wt. fortified with grease) into your car engine and start it on a cold day, the shear factor will be so great that you will either spin the rod bearing in the rod or peal the babbit material off of the bearings,
    To some degree this is the effect that lets me climb cut with my R/T table, as long as I dont go too crazy with depth of cut and override the shear factor, works for me anyways.

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  • SGW
    replied
    In my experience, "cushion" is a bad thing. I once tried some #40 synthetic oil as way lube on my lathe, figuring it would pretty well eliminate metal-to-metal contact and wear. It sure did -- it floated the carriage so well I was getting random drift of as much as 0.002" in diameters that I turned. When I went back to proper way lube, the problem went away.

    So...I'd be wary of too heavy an oil for your rotary table.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    I agree with Chief on the dissasembly, get all the junk out of it, For mine I reassembled with 80w90 wt. gear oil I had but I also fortified it with moly grease, I think the more "cushion" you have in a rotary table the better, it keeps the chatter down and will make the parts last longer, and I dont lose fluid when I have to tip it upsidedown to clean and such, I think vactra would be good also, when I crank my R.T. handle I want to feel some resistance, not from being too tight as mine is set up perfect but from thick lube, I like to be able to do some light climb cutting on mine on occasion

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  • darryl
    replied
    The compressor oil would be the one to use, of that choice.

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  • Joel
    replied
    I use way lube, but honestly, it's a rotary table - just about anything will be adequate IMHO.

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  • chief
    replied
    Rotary table oil

    Fred,
    Go with the lighter 30w, it tends to pick less chips than gear oil. It might be a good idea to take it a apart and clean out the factory lubricant, I have found a lot of crap in new equipment.

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  • Fred_M
    started a topic Lubrication

    Lubrication

    My newly acquired rotary table instructions say to use light weight hydraulic fluid or spindle oil. Can I use 85w-90 weight gear lube or 30 weight compressor oil? I have some of both. - Fred.
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