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  • MIG Welding & reflected light

    I had some spare time over the weekend, so I was finally able to try out my welder. I must have done a decent job, because I couldn’t break the weld. It will be a while before I post any of my work as the bead looks horrible.

    One thing I quickly discovered was that I was getting light reflecting off the garage wall (white) behind me into the hood, and into my eye. I quickly whipped up a Lawrence of Arabia looking neck protector out of an old t-shirt, and that solved the problem. The old t-shirt worked well, but it constantly needed adjusted.

    Has anyone ever made a cloth backing/top for their hood?

    I was thinking of picking up some light weight canvas and making a hood backing that I could just Velcro in-place.

    I was thinking of something like this, only in the back of course.

    http://weilerwelding.com/shopsite_sc...a/HUN25052.jpg
    -Dan S.
    dans-hobbies.com

  • #2
    I've had that problem, I usually just adjust my position so the wall behind me is not at a 90, and the light will be bouncing every which way before it gets to me.

    Comment


    • #3
      Welding bay

      Why not make up a welding bay curtain? They not only do the job of shielding you but they shield everybody else.

      The material should be heavy-weight and not a light colour. Perhaps use a lighter material with weights or chain in the lower hem.

      It should be "movable" and hung on a sliding rail - similar to bed-curtains in a Hospital ward.

      If the whole arrangement is portable you can weld where you like.

      The curtain will largely eliminate the problems of air breezes blowing the "gas cloud" (Argon/Argon mix) about and away from the job. Increasing the flow rate to counter air breeze can cause as many problems as it solves.

      Never the less, there is a need for ventilation - for obvious reasons.

      The curtain will eliminate the need for protection from reflections as "flash" can cause some quite uncomfortable eye problems.

      Keep arms and hands covered as the "burn" can be quite significant as well and may have long-term effects - wear over-alls with sleeves and wear welding gloves.

      I buy the "MIG welders" gloves at my steel supplier - although light (woman's??) gardening gloves do just as well as they are very pliable and have a very good "feel" and sensitivity required for MIG welding. These gloves are required and work just as well for arc, oxy-acet and TIG welding as well. I also use them for plasma cutting. For oxy-acet cutting I use welders gauntlets (long sleeves) and a welders leather jacket or apron as well.

      In ALL cases wear heavy boots and sometimes even anklets to keep hot metal out of the boots. A welding/hot-metal burn on the feet is something that you only have happen once!!

      I make sure that I am well covered as welding can leave some serious skin burns.

      I use an automatic welding hood which can be set at 7 to 15. I use the 7 as "seeing" with these (or most) hoods can be difficult with MIG - more so than "stick".

      The following links might help - I hope so - they were a great help to me.
      http://www.thefabricator.com/ArcWeld...le.cfm?ID=1083

      http://www.millerwelds.com/education...pamphlets.html

      http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/mig_handbook.pdf

      http://www.millerwelds.com/education/tools/#training

      http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...e/basics2.html

      http://www.millerwelds.com/education...rticles70.html

      http://www.millerwelds.com/interests...bending-brake/

      http://www.millerwelds.com/interests...welding-table/

      Comment


      • #4
        Migs and light

        We always wore a cotton hat with the peak worn backwards. The trick was to fill the space between the hat and the mask. Mine- a solar powered one, was shiny. On reflection( oh, no), it should be matt black.

        Cheers

        norm

        Comment


        • #5
          What Norm said. Just wear a welder's cap, and it'll fill-up the gap between the hood and your head, no reflections. You'll want a welder's cap anyway when you weld overhead.

          The welder's cap doesn't have to be dark -- lately I've been wearing a lava-red had with lightning bolts that my daughter bought for me
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

          Comment


          • #6
            some of the guys i use to work alongside with ship/boat building used both methods, one of them used the welders cap backwards trick and he made 50 boats using that method, the other guy used to pop rivit leather to the fron and back of the mask to cover his neck for welders tan and the back for light

            Comment


            • #7
              The Legion

              Originally posted by aviemoron
              We always wore a cotton hat with the peak worn backwards. The trick was to fill the space between the hat and the mask. Mine- a solar powered one, was shiny. On reflection( oh, no), it should be matt black.

              Cheers

              norm

              Watch out Norm, if it looks too much like a Kepi the French Police or the French Foreign Legion might get ya!!


              http://www.hatsinthebelfry.com/page/H/PROD/v180cwht

              But stay out of Algeria - its a very nasty place at present!!

              They might think you are the legendary Michael "Beau" Geste (like most my age, I saw the film/s "Beau Geste" - can't remember who was in it though as there were several).

              Put on boots (shiny - of course!! and anklets/gaiters) and they'll be sure - so look out.

              They might send you off to "look after" Colonel Gaddaffi's (Libya) (all female) body guard!!!
              http://beautifulatrocities.com/archi..._amazon_1.html

              http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=e...G=Search&meta=

              Quite a story - particularly Vietnam - where it all started?
              http://members.tripod.com/~vet4/foreignlegion.html

              http://www.google.com.au/search?q=fr...n&start=0&sa=N

              http://www.foreignlegionlife.com/

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Foreign_Legion

              Comment


              • #8
                Bolts

                Originally posted by lazlo
                What Norm said. Just wear a welder's cap, and it'll fill-up the gap between the hood and your head, no reflections. You'll want a welder's cap anyway when you weld overhead.

                The welder's cap doesn't have to be dark -- lately I've been wearing a lava-red had with lightning bolts that my daughter bought for me
                I can do better than that. I was born (came into being, was created?) with bolts coming out of the side of my neck - I might be related to the Adams family - the likeness and attitude is there alright.

                As you'd expect.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like the canvas approach. It holds those fumes in until you can suck them all down deep into your lungs. Blowing your nose in the morning will gross out the staunchest of McDonalds patrons. Sort of a "job site filtration system" (I wear a hat with my welding hood)
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Other people

                    There has been no mention of other people in the area near the welding process.

                    They too can be "flashed" either directly or by reflection too - and they need to be considered and protected as appropriate.

                    The "curtain" method I suggested addresses that problem as well as having wind or breeze blow the MIG gas cloud off the job.

                    Common sense is required as regards general all round safety - including ventilation of welding fumes!!

                    This is my shed/shop. The prevailing winds are generally from the viewing direction of the first pic.

                    Both the shed/shop and the Car-port have very good overhead lighting for use at any time of night or day.

                    I do all of my welding and grinding on the concrete apron of the car-port or on the the gravel driveway.

                    If possible, I close the roller door to the garage/shed to keep the welding fumes out of the shed/shop. The fumes might not affect me where I am welding but the wind will blow them into the shop/shed where all my machine tools and work-bench are.

                    I hang a Painter's drop sheet from the roof rafters/purlins in the car-port to shield the breeze from the welding gases (MIG, plasma-cutting, oxy-acet and my "Cobra" OA torch).

                    It all works very well.

                    If I do have to work inside the shop, I minimise the welding works and have a lot of windows open (Roller door too if possible) and have a fairly large pedestal fan going as well.



                    This is my welding gear out of the shed an on the concrete apron in the car-port.




                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dan s
                      I had some spare time over the weekend, so I was finally able to try out my welder. I must have done a decent job, because I couldn’t break the weld. It will be a while before I post any of my work as the bead looks horrible.

                      One thing I quickly discovered was that I was getting light reflecting off the garage wall (white) behind me into the hood, and into my eye. I quickly whipped up a Lawrence of Arabia looking neck protector out of an old t-shirt, and that solved the problem. The old t-shirt worked well, but it constantly needed adjusted.

                      Has anyone ever made a cloth backing/top for their hood?

                      I was thinking of picking up some light weight canvas and making a hood backing that I could just Velcro in-place.

                      I was thinking of something like this, only in the back of course.

                      http://weilerwelding.com/shopsite_sc...a/HUN25052.jpg
                      ************************************************** ***************
                      I use a helment that I have seen few of, maybe because of the cost. Anyway it works fine for me and I do not have to wear a welding cap either.
                      The welding helment I am talking about is a Speed-Glas variable shade made by 3M and it has a hardhat with it. I like having the hardhat because it has sure prevented some lumps on my old bald head while climbing and welding on structures that I weld up from time to time......pg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        After you've been doing it for awhile you won't even notice the backflash. The only thing that bothers me is direct sunlight right in the back of the hat. I can usually wiggle around till it is hid by my noodle.
                        I never wear my welding cap backwards. Always sideways...not because of any wiggerness...just to protect my left ear. The way I hold the stinger or whip and the way I cock my head when welding always seems to leave my left side open to sizzlers. I got a huge sizzler in my ear once. Felt like it went right into my brain. Had to be one of the most painful things I've ever felt. Luckily that part is small enough that the hot BB missed it but it sure messed up some other stuff. Got infection in my ear that lasted for a month.
                        I always wear ear plugs now when doing heavy welding. Even had a big sizzler melt half way through a foam ear plug once. That hurt too but it was better than having the BB in the old ear canal.
                        One of the worst is welding inside of big SS tanks. The reflection inside them is enough to boil the skin off your mother-in-law.
                        Russ
                        I have tools I don't even know I own...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I should probably clarify that I’m currently using flux-core as I haven’t gotten a bottle yet.

                          I don’t have to worry about harming anyone else while welding, as I’m welding in my garage that has no windows, and my fiancé knows to yell out and check that it’s ok before she opens the door.

                          With regard to my personal safety I have been wearing a good pair of boots, jeans that come down over the boots, a long sleeve t-shirt covered by a thick flannel shirt, and a pair of safety glasses behind my hood. My hood is a Hobart
                          XVS model.

                          It sounds like I should crack the garage door to let the fumes out?
                          -Dan S.
                          dans-hobbies.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Flux-cored et al

                            Originally posted by dan s
                            I should probably clarify that I’m currently using flux-core as I haven’t gotten a bottle yet.

                            I don’t have to worry about harming anyone else while welding, as I’m welding in my garage that has no windows, and my fiancé knows to yell out and check that it’s ok before she opens the door.

                            With regard to my personal safety I have been wearing a good pair of boots, jeans that come down over the boots, a long sleeve t-shirt covered by a thick flannel shirt, and a pair of safety glasses behind my hood. My hood is a Hobart
                            XVS model.

                            It sounds like I should crack the garage door to let the fumes out?
                            Thanks dan.

                            Don't apologise for using flux-cored wire - at all.

                            Evan has doe some excellent work on his domestic MIG welder using only flux-cored wire. There were a couple of very good threads with good advice from/by Evan on that very topic.

                            I hope he reads this thread and posts the links to those threads that he posted his comments on.

                            There was some discussion on the pros and cons of "Flux-cored" vs "plain wire and gas/argon/argon-mix".

                            They were quite interesting and instructive.

                            If Evan does not see or reply to this thread you should PM him.

                            Re gases etc. While there has not been much to say that the fumes are toxic or dangerous there hasn't been anything to say that any or too much is safe either.

                            Just use common sense and don't neglect the safety aspects.

                            For some constructive hints and advice, see my previous posts and links.

                            It takes some getting "on top of" but once you do (it doesn't take long at all really) its very satisfying and well worth the effort.

                            But like any manual skill, you have to practice it regularly to "keep your hand in".

                            Keep the shop door open as often as you can or do your welding in the open as natural daylight is the best light of all - and the breeze will sort out the welding fumes as well.

                            Best of luck.

                            Comment

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