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Wiring Dual-Voltage Motor for High Voltage

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  • Wiring Dual-Voltage Motor for High Voltage

    Hey Everyone

    I recently purchased used HMT vertical mill. This is an Indian machine, well made, of the same caliber as the Enterprise lathe that many of us might be familiar with. It has and Indian made 1.5 hp dual-voltage motor on it, I want to wire it for 440V operation (the nameplate states acceptable voltages are 220V and 440V). The problem is, no one is familiar with the wiring and there are no numbers on any of the motor leads – there may have been, numbers might have been printed on the insulation, but if so, it looks as though they got sprayed when the mill was painted. Here are a couple pictures and a diagram that I made of the current configuration:







    What I called a bus, is actually three bars that can be used independently to tie across the block horizontally.

    Upon arrival our novice Maintenance crew put a plug on the thing and fired it up, I thought the motor got too hot too quick so I asked them to check some things out, but they’re not the sharpest or most motivated group you’ll find.

    Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

    Edit: I'm currently studying the sticky to figure out how to get thes images to come up in the post..... crossing fingers....

    Chandler
    Last edited by chandler0109; 12-13-2007, 06:53 PM.

  • #2
    Man, You are screwed.

    #1 rule Don't paint the wires.
    #2 rule never use thinner to remove paint from the wires , the markings will come off.

    Comment


    • #3
      480 Connection:

      O
      I
      O
      I
      O
      (I = tie bar)
      240 Connection:

      O--O

      O--O

      O--O

      ( -- tie bar)

      hope this helps
      (edited, I was wrong the first time !)
      http://www.johnson-pump.com/Horticul...tart-motor.htm
      Last edited by Bmyers; 12-11-2007, 09:19 PM.

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      • #4
        Standard european motor and it's wired for 440 at the moment.
        You need to connect your phases to the three wires o the left.

        If you need to reverse you swap any two phsw wires over. The reversing switch has to ge between the supply and the motor,not as you have it shown.



        .
        .

        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Guys!

          John: Is there a difference between “European” and “USA” motors with respect to changing voltage? The reason I ask is because one of the fellows at the Warehouse referred to this difference…….. actually he was referring to “Asian” motors, but he may have meant “other than USA”.

          You see, I checked this machine out, they had it under power at their facility – 440V and everything was fine, then we trucked it to our facility, installed the plug, and things got questionable (only because I felt things were getting hot) I asked them to look into it and their (the Maintenance Department) idea of doing so is to look at another motor close by………. But I also notice that all three of the flexible gray leads coming from the motor (not the six varnished ones) have only about 1/3 of the wire intact inside the ring terminals, the rest of the strands were broken off, so my first suggestion to them was to replace the terminals, tighten everything down and hang an ammeter on it to test the current draw. They chose not to try this, but to go by example of another motor and a sketch from somewhere else. I’m embarrassed to say what their solution was, but I’m a lot more interested in solving this problem than saving face for the company I work for! They tied across the terminal block in a horizontal fashion with the tie bars as in John’s lower image, but then connected L1, L2, & L3 (from the reversing switch) directly to the three gray leads from the motor (but not to any of the studs), just wire-nutted the red, black, & blue each to one of the gray leads………… I said I didn’t feel good about that, and made them clamp an ammeter on the line, 8 Amps – well that’s a problem, should be getting about 1.3 I think.

          Of course there’s political issues involved – I’m an Engineer that went over their heads to get a used mill rather than a new drill press, this company almost always buys new, and I’m understanding why now! But I’ll do just about anything to help someone that truly wants to do a good job, and we’ve got some folks in the department that will do a lot of good for us, we’ll be able to slot holes on site rather than sending things back to the “Mother Ship”, modify a few fixtures – hell, I can’t even imagine having a house without a mill though, so I’m biased I guess! I absolutely refuse to stand by and watch them destroy a motor though just to prove that I bought “a piece of junk”.

          Sorry for the rant, and thanks for your help

          Chandler
          Last edited by chandler0109; 12-12-2007, 01:34 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I feel your pain. I installed some of the first plcs in the tri state area. Trying to tell a electrician it was not a relay box, trying to tell a mechanic not to stand in the automated mixers without turning off the main, trying to tell the fitter not to plumb water into the box. He thought that was a dandy place to put his filter system.

            I can still hear the mechanic saying, if that thing turns on while I am in here.. I'm gonna whip @@@@ your ass. I had installed rotating warning lights, horns. You can't fix stupid. On the bright side of that? it'd made hamburger out of his silly butt and the world's iq would have went up a point.

            I built a pc/plc dye mixing machine, the electrician would say, It's mechanical, the mechanic would say it's electrical. Then I'd get to fix it.

            SO? fix it. Wait till about 2am, when all them rascals are gone, when they show up and it works? pat them on the back and smile and say thank you and a good job they done.
            Excuse me, I farted.

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            • #7
              Are you sure they are supplying the motor with 440?
              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #8
                David – You made me smile! Thanks, it’s very frustrating, I’ve been very fortunate to have worked alongside some really talented folks in the past, the kinda people that were eager to solve a problem, and earned a lot of respect for doing so. Now I work for a company whose name is a household word and there is absolutely no passion in the whole department! The only way anything gets done is if there is a dot-to-dot picture like we used to do when we were kids!

                Darin – Actually, in our neck of the woods we’re getting 480V, should be fine for the motor though, funny thing is I told them that they could drop a 240V drop if that was easier, they said “Well the motor should run on 480V” I said “Yeah, it should” but didn’t get any response other than the “Deer in the Headlights” look!

                Thanks

                Chandler

                Comment


                • #9
                  "I built a pc/plc dye mixing machine, the electrician would say, It's mechanical, the mechanic would say it's electrical. "

                  David I feel your pain, Had the Same type of guys at a foundry I worked at a few years ago

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