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"The Math Problem"

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  • "The Math Problem"

    Thanks for your math help guys! Only about once a year I get to do stuff like this. The math gets forgotten.
    The pic doesn't do it justice. Got a couple little bawbbles...the rest turned out great. This thing is going on top of some bigass statue some artist is building. 42" across...made from 1/4" plate. Lotta cutting with the plasma cutter.

    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    As Dave would say"I didn't know you were into that artsy fartsy type work"

    Looks good,I like the occasional odd job,reminds me of the stainless steel pig I built once,PITA,but I made good coin on it.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by torker
      Thanks for your math help guys! Only about once a year I get to do stuff like this. The math gets forgotten.
      The pic doesn't do it justice. Got a couple little bawbbles...the rest turned out great. This thing is going on top of some bigass statue some artist is building. 42" across...made from 1/4" plate. Lotta cutting with the plasma cutter.

      Russ

      verry cool.

      Comment


      • #4
        Neat work. Happy to have contributed a little.

        If you can, post a picture of the finished statue when it's done.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

        Comment


        • #5
          i will resist the urge to hit the quote button


          Nice job - this only fuels my general ... well contempt is too strong of a word ... for artists that do abstract metal sculptures. If the artist has to go to a fab shop to get his sculpture made, well where's the art in that? Its like me imagining a fantastic landscape and then taking it in somewhere for it to be painted...

          alright rant off

          Comment


          • #6
            Is "disdain" the word you're looking for?

            I don't see anything wrong with an artist seeking out someone who has the skills he lacks to bring his artistic ideas to completion. I've seen some really competent people who rarely have an original idea, and I've seen some really creative people who can't do much with their hands.

            My hat's off to Torker for taking the time to figure out how to do a good job of making what the artist wanted, instead of suggesting he go with 18 spokes.

            Roger
            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

            Comment


            • #7
              yes disdain was exactly it! i guess its that whole border-line aspergers syndrome that Evan brought up earlier

              Absolutely hats off to torker, and your right - we need thinkers and do'ers both

              Comment


              • #8
                Neat little "sun"? "shield"? Whatever...

                Just curious, did you draw and free hand, or build fixtures. Looks like it would only need 2, and I think that's how I would have done it. I don't like free-handing those long spans like that, especially not that many.
                Russ
                Master Floor Sweeper

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                • #9
                  That reminds me of years ago when I worked at Sidney Aircraft Repair on Vancouver Island. It was a very small shop, I was the employee of the two owners. During the summer everybody is out flying so we would take in whatever metalwork came through the door. There were two jobs in particular that stretched the math skills figuring out all the angles and bends. One was a great big steel fireplace hood that I built for a restaurant. Basically a pyramid shape but with none of the sides the same size or shape. It tapered from one side to the other and the front was smaller than the back. I managed it though as it wasn't all that long since I had been in school.

                  The other project was building the monocoque chassis for a Can-Am race car. The owner brought in a mangled mess of aluminum and I took on the job. I had to take it apart and flatten every piece back out to make a pattern of sorts, subject to correction for tearing and some serious bending. That required me to figure out mathematically what aligned with what as at some points such as the corners of the cockpit bridge six layers of metal all met and had to be riveted together. Someday I may find the photos I took but they have been missing for years.
                  Last edited by Evan; 01-03-2008, 05:22 AM.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Torker is the artist.

                    I don't know how many have seen or used plasma cutters - or oxy-acetylene manually operated cutters - in action.

                    Both require very high skill levels requiring very high orders of co-ordination, concentration and anticipation. It is a true manual art.

                    Plasma hand cutting is the hardest to keep on a line but gets a very good edge and causes less distortion. And its damn near impossible to see the cutting arc at times so you have to work largely blind.

                    I think that Torker deserves due credit for not only being big enough to ask for help in the first place but he had to and did deliver what may be regarded as a work of art by any measure. And all under very considerable pressure as well.

                    It would have been all to easy to "send/contract it out" to a CNC plasma cutting shop - but he stuck at it and got it right.

                    And at the end of it all, he didn't brag but did give due thanks to all who helped and make it a "we" instead of a "me" job.

                    Great job all round Torker.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks guys! I've said it before and I don't mind saying it again...the guys on this board have helped me out so many times. I'll take on damm near anything because I know you all will lend me a hand if I have problems.
                      And I've got "The Gurl". This lady is the best thing that's happened to my lil' shop. This "Artsy Fartsy" stuff is her world. Her attention to detail is what makes jobs like this come out so well.
                      OK...The sequence...
                      First I made a cutting jig for the spokes. It was made undersize of course to compensate for the plasma torch. We clamped it on the centerline of each layout line as we went around.
                      I made two other jigs. One to mark it all out. A long piece of 1" flat bar with an upright welded on the outboard end. A piece of soapstone was clamped to this to layout the circles.
                      A similar jig was made that housed the plasma cutter head. It was drilled for the three different diameters needed.
                      Warpage was a huge issue with this. It was a real battle to get the cutting jig to work as the thing was curling up like a piece of frying bacon the whole time we worked on it.
                      Very hard on the back and shoulders. All humped over for several hours, trying to be as steady as possible.
                      The only thing that came round to bite me...I laid out the jig for a new consumable. What started out as new at the beginning of the long circumferance cut ended up cutting wider by the end of the cut so we had a slight "ski jump" at that point.
                      LOL! It looked almost hopeless near the end...the whole thing was warped and twisted. Funny...knocked the last piece of waste out and the whole thing popped back flat again. Metal and heat do funny things.
                      As for the artist not doing this himself...I think he only does bronze work. I don't think he delves into the fab/cutting end of things.
                      We are getting more and more of this "weird" (sorry Darin) kind of work. None of the other shops in town want it so it all ends up here. Sometimes that is good...sometimes not.
                      Thanks again!
                      Russ (and the Gurl)( )
                      I have tools I don't even know I own...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well more strength to your elbow etc.
                        It makes my day when someone has a go at something new warms the cockles of my heart (and other English sayings)
                        I only wish I had the space to try some of these things myself just dont have the room as it is I have to mount most machines on wheels to juggle for space. Can't wait to see the picks of your new shop!!!
                        Just keep posting Russ I'll live your dreams with you I have learnt a lot with the answers to some of your 'jobs' I have read answers to things I didnt even know where problems!!!

                        Keep it up

                        Peter
                        I have tools I don't know how to use!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Russ,

                          Be glad you didn't have to make one like this.



                          That thing was like a wet noodle even though it is from 1/2" plate.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            way to go Russ
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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