Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Picture for Evan

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Picture for Evan

    Evan, when you were trying to identify your lever-operated horizontal mill, I vaguely remembered a discussion on PM about one that was very similar.
    I just stumbled across the pictures, on a completely unrelated search.

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...d.php?t=146210

    This is a Nichols' lever-operated horizontal mill. The headstock is more modern, but it sure looks like it could be a direct descendant of your mill:



    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

  • #2
    Well, it's a lever operated mill alright. But that's about the only similarity that I see.

    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

    Comment


    • #3
      Evan,

      Did you ever figure out anything else out on this mill? Maker or spindle taper? I realize you are in busy with the CNC mill (nice work, by the way) but your little mill really caught my attention.

      TIA Jon
      Jon Bohlander
      My PM Blog

      Comment


      • #4
        The spindle is a standard Shaublin nose and taper as used on many European mills. The maker will remain a mystery. If the largest machine tool dealer in Switzerland doesn't know what it is then there isn't much hope of finding out except by pure luck. Since it has no "pedigree" to be concerned with I feel free to modify it if I see fit. I'm going to make a vertical spindle adapter for it first. That should be a pretty trivial exercise since it is designed to use one anyway. It even came with a pair of riser blocks that will be ideal to fit to the vertical adapter which saves me building anything at that end.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Evan
          Well, it's a lever operated mill alright. But that's about the only similarity that I see.
          That was my thought as well, esp since yours is obviously European and the Nichols is obviously American...I see no connection between the two mills whatsoever. Lazlo seems to have this curious compulsion to make "connections" between types of machines...perhaps some therapy is in order to break this compulsion

          Comment


          • #6
            Don, there's an obvious lineage between many of these machines. Your much hallowed Deckel FP1 is a copy of the Maho SK250, which was derived from Thiel Type 58.

            Similarly, you took issue when Mike C. noted that the Abene VF-3 was derived from the (much earlier) Van Norman #12.

            Originally posted by Mike C. View Post
            That Abene looks again suspicously similar to a Van Norman, heheh. Just has the ram on an angle.

            Too bad the heirs ran Van Norman into the ground, it'd be interesting to see what they would have produced if given time.
            I agreed with Mike's comparison, and posted pictures of the two machines side-by-side, but for some reason you turned your ire towards me. I guess Mike has been on PM a lot longer

            Van Norman:



            Abene:

            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lazlo
              Don, there's an obvious lineage between many of these machines. Your much hallowed Deckel FP1 is a copy of the Maho SK250, which was derived from Thiel Type 58.

              Similarly, you took issue when Mike C. noted that the Abene VF-3 was derived from the (much earlier) Van Norman #12.



              I agreed with Mike's comparison, and posted pictures of the two machines side-by-side, but for some reason you turned your ire towards me. I guess Mike has been on PM a lot longer
              I have only a vague memory of that thread, but at least that one made some sense, as there are indeed similarities between the Van Norman and the Abene. Other than the lever on X, there are almost no similarities between Evans mill and a Nichols mill. When I made the comment I was thinking of your recent turret lathe brain lock and trying to make connections there. So then you drege up this ancient history from another forum to try and salvage your honor I guess, but my point is "who cares?" really...why this desire to try and make historical connections between machine designs that may, or may not have been influenced each other ? No way to know really, so why even speculate about it ?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Evan
                Well, it's a lever operated mill alright. But that's about the only similarity that I see.
                Your mill and the Nichols are very unusual in that they have both a rack and pinion feed and a conventional leadscrew table feed.

                By the way, I'm not the first person to note the similarity:

                http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...0&postcount=41

                Originally posted by Optics Curmudgeon
                Look closely at the table feed, there is both a rack feed and a leadscrew. You can switch back and forth. There are others like this, such as Nichols.

                Joe
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Milacron of PM
                  So then you drege up this ancient history from another forum to try and salvage your honor I guess
                  Huh? What does this have to do with the turret lathe discussion??

                  I noted that the little red lathe didn't have a carriage, and asked Wolf if he knew of another turret lathe that didn't (since all the turret lathes that I've seen, and that are described in machinery texts, have a carriage).

                  You posted an example of one, I stood corrected. How did I "lose honor" from that?

                  I'm an amateur machinist, and you're a machine tool dealer -- I'd certainly hope that you know more about these machines than I do

                  By the way Don, I ran across that PM thread from a completely unrelated Google search. I had promised Evan a picture of the Nichols lever-operated miller awhile ago, but couldn't find the picture. So when I found it, I posted it. There's no conspricacy.
                  Last edited by lazlo; 01-12-2008, 01:20 PM.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lazlo
                    Your mill and the Nichols are very unusual in that they have both a rack and pinion feed and a conventional leadscrew table feed.
                    Nichols made many different versions of their mill. One of the Nichols models did have screw and rack on X axis, but never on Y axis...like Evans mill does.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Milacron of PM
                      Nichols made many different versions of their mill. One of the Nichols models did have screw and rack on X axis, but never on Y axis...like Evans mill does.
                      They did Don:

                      Production Model with all the table movements controlled by levers.
                      http://www.lathes.co.uk/nichols/page3.html

                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lazlo
                        They did Don:
                        Very interesting, I stand corrected then. Never seen a Nichols like that, very rare I suspect. I have a 1970's Nichols full line brochure and no Y axis levers in there anywhere. I used to covet a Nichols a dealer owned that was basically two mills opposing each other with a single table in between. That way you could bore holes that aligned with each other easily, which would have been handy for the tapping machines I made back then.
                        Last edited by Milacron of PM; 01-12-2008, 01:51 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wow How long did it take Lazlo to Dredge up that Photo to Prove Himself right, I bet He can't find two more.















                          That may keep him busy for a while.












                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Evan. It looks a lot like an early Burke horizontal mill.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Do you have a link to a picture anywhere?
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X