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D1-4 Backplate Drawings? Suggestions?

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  • D1-4 Backplate Drawings? Suggestions?

    I have a 5" 6 jaw adjust true type Buck chuck that needs to go on a D1-4 backplate. I have been planning to make the backplate, but I have a few problems. First, I have found one D1-4 drawing as follows:

    http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/chuckmt.html

    But this drawing only covers the spindle nose and register - not the camlock part. So my first problem is finding a more complete drawing. My second problem is making a model of the spindle nose to test fit on the backplate as I make it. My spindle nose has a small relief cut at the junction of the register to the spindle face. I think this makes sense, but I don't know how to measure the spindle to make the model. I would be interested in suggestions on this point or alternative ways to get to the desired result.

  • #2
    ENCO has ground 5" Bison D1-4 backplates on sale for 99 bucks. Hard to beat that. I bet you're gonna have more hours into it than its worth to make vs buy.
    Ignorance is curable through education.

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    • #3
      CDCO has a 5" D-1 adaptor for $42.00!! -------

      http://www.cdcotools.com/index.php
      If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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      • #4
        Good timing - I just started on a collet chuck for my D1-3, and cut the D1-3 back over the weekend. Here's the result (slightly out of focus):



        On the pins: I cheated and used some from an eBay auction. When finished the chuck blank fit just right - clamped up tight and needed a little 'rap' to break it loose after unlocking.

        What you'll need in addition to the data that you have is the bolt circle diameter of the lock SHCS. You can calculate that by removing all the pins and putting in the SHCS far enoug to take out most of the slack, then measuring the distance between screws (outside to outside). Subtract the head diameter from each dimension and calculate the distance to center from one of the points considering average distance to be the side of an equilateral triangle.

        Once you have the BC for the pins measure the distance from the camloc pin to the far side of the SHCS for all the positions as well as the pin diameters. Calculate the average c-to-c distance then consider that as the hypotenuse of a right triangle with another side being the difference between the radius of the camloc pin BC and the lock screw BC. The unknown side (now known) can be used to calculate the angular displacement between the camloc pin and SHCS, the displacement being used in a BC position calculation.

        The counterbore on the camloc pin can be drilled, but the larger c'bore on the SHCS (there's a small amount of thread relief in the tapped hole, about 1/8") can be drilled to a size close to the camloc c'bore, then bored to size. If you have a spare you might shorten a standard counterbore and use the thread relief to guide the tool, avoiding the single point boring. All this is necessare because of the interference from the screw head to stop the camloc pin's rotation.

        The angle is pretty easy, just indicate it in on your spindle face. As I recall it's 7 deg 7.5min. I'd suggest overboring it a little bit, then measuring the gap against the spindle face and calculating a finish cut. Cut the taper before drilling and tapping the pins and all, being sure that you face off both side square. It's a lot easier finding center of a bore than the center of a BC...

        If you have any questions feel free to ask.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rkepler
          The angle is pretty easy, just indicate it in on your spindle face. As I recall it's 7 deg 7.5min. I'd suggest overboring it a little bit, then measuring the gap against the spindle face and calculating a finish cut.
          Very sage advice.

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          • #6
            My concern on the register was not the angle - I would indicate that as well. It is getting the correct diameter where the register meets the backplate. Too small, and the register does no good. Too large and the chuck will not seat.

            Edit: The other point is the drawing. While I could measure the lathe and existing chucks, it would be nice to have a drawing to get the locking SHCS's right on. The camlock studs are pretty easy to measure so I was not worried about them.
            Last edited by Bruce Griffing; 01-15-2008, 08:52 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bruce Griffing
              My concern on the register was not the angle - I would indicate that as well. It is getting the correct diameter where the register meets the backplate. Too small, and the register does no good. Too large and the chuck will not seat.
              You could machine up a gage, testing a chuck against it while machining it. When the gage is sitting .000 to .002 from the chuck back all the way around you're in the ballpark. If you trust your chuck and mount you can simply pull the chuck the work is in and use the spindle face as a gage. You might find a scrapped spindle for use as a gage. But you really can't do this w/o something as a gage.

              Edit: The other point is the drawing. While I could measure the lathe and existing chucks, it would be nice to have a drawing to get the locking SHCS's right on. The camlock studs are pretty easy to measure so I was not worried about them.
              If it matters $68 worth: http://webstore.ansi.org/RecordDetai...O+702-2%3a2007

              But really the location of the lock SHCS isn't quite as critical as the pin location, the procedure I outlined would get you within a couple thousandths.

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              • #8
                I do want to make a gage. But I don't have any existing chuck that I trust for the test fit. That is why I was trying to find a way to measure. I may use some spotting dye on the spindle to check out the questionable chucks that I already have. Maybe one of them is better than I think.

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