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How to attach brass ferrule to wooden shaft?

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  • How to attach brass ferrule to wooden shaft?

    Any ideas or suggestions please. (I've posted this elsewhere so apologies to those who've read it and raised their eyebrows already)

    The brass ferrule is 29 mm OD with a 17.5mm hole through and an internal 24mm fine thread which a 45mm dia brass ball is screwed onto. I'm making 6 of these, the balls are already made.

    The end of the shaft (walking stick/cane) is bored with a corresponding 17.5mm hole to accept a test tube for snifter of spirits, which means the ferrule cannot be pinned through radially. The material is mahogany substitute hardwood (iroko or similar) and the first attempt wouldn't take the same 24mm fine thread without splintering so I could screw and glue.

    Would you suggest maybe a coarser thread or just glue. I want these to be quite robust as they are for gifts. Any body with prior experience? Pictures are supposed to tell a thousand words here are 4 to show where I am at present:


    The test tube screws into the ball which is the lid (cork insert to be added).

    I wanted the ferrule to screw onto the cane with the help of glue, but as you can see what was supposed to be a wooden thread isn't.

    The ferrule shown is the first try runt.

    How it's supposed to look assembled but shinier!

  • #2
    Knife makers use 5 Minute Epoxy all the time for applications just like yours. It doesn't seem to cure brittle hard so it grips well. I used to mix a trace of "lamp black" powder in the concrete product isle (available at most hardware stores) to color it black so the razer thin glue line that shows looks more like a decoration.

    Nice Job on the canes, your friends will love them.
    Last edited by Your Old Dog; 01-17-2008, 06:56 AM.
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    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

    Comment


    • #3
      There are several high strength epoxys that will work for this.
      I would use Accraglass or Accraglass Gel (available through Brownells) because that's what I have in stock, but marine-tex or Devcon steel putty will work great too.
      The accraglass products come a tube of black and a tube of brown dye. With out dye the Gel cures to a butter yellow colour and the standard Accraglass is amber coloured. Both are 24hr cure time products.

      I would not use a 5 minute epoxy, I doubt it would be rugged enough. Where as any of the 4 above have proven track records for taking serious abuse.
      Ignorance is curable through education.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Rusty Marlin
        I would not use a 5 minute epoxy, I doubt it would be rugged enough. Where as any of the 4 above have proven track records for taking serious abuse.
        Actually that's not correct. Some of the most expensive knives made in the world have glued on handles. You just have to be savvy enough to have something for it to grip such as threads (as in this case) or belling out the bottom of the hole. Has the added advantage of being removable if you put enough heat to it such as if a cane broke.

        No need for elephant guns while only hunting canarys. The job does not have to withstand the rigors of outer space. I've used Acra Glass and agree it's a great product. Don't think I'd use it to put notes on the refrigerator though, scotch tape works just fine for that job.
        Last edited by Your Old Dog; 01-17-2008, 01:55 PM.
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        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

        Comment


        • #5
          The job does not have to withstand the rigors of outer space.
          It would seem the Right Honorable Gentleman has never heard of someone going on a spacewalk.




          Comment


          • #6
            I glued a stainless steel knob onto a walking stick with a polyurethane glue - something on the order of "Gorilla Glue". It has two big advantages: It swells to fill any gaps, and it is semi-rigid, so will withstand shock-loads, something that most unfilled epoxies won't do. (And not many filled ones, either.)

            It's about as strong as a good epoxy, too - I did a lot of testing on adhesives, and urethanes generally were stronger than the rock maple blocks I used for testing them.

            The big DISadvantage is that it swells, so it tends to foam out of the joint. Not much of a problem if you're on top of it - you can scrape/wipe it off before it polymerizes - but once it sets, you have to razor it off.

            BTW, it also works a treat for securing loose hammer heads. I tried a steel-filled epoxy to fit one of my smithing hammers, and the adhesive lasted about two hours before it came out in little chunks. I redid the job with urethane, and it's been holding for at least twenty years.

            One caution - it cures by absorption of atmospheric moisture, so it hardens from the outside in, and if one surface is impermeable, e.g. metal, it may take a long while to set up. To accelerate it, you can wipe the permeable surface with a damp cloth, immediately before you assemble the joint.

            Pete Heinlein, NJ
            Pete in NJ

            Comment


            • #7
              Pete,
              Can you give me a name brand to try?
              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
              Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

              It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

              Comment


              • #8
                The one that I see most often around here (north-central Noo Joizey) is "Gorilla Glue" - you'll find it at Home Despot, in everything from 2-oz bottles (about $5, usually right at the cash-registers) up to pints or even quarts. It's brown, and cures to a beige/tan color. It takes stain fairly well when it's cured, but I've never tried to stain it wet. BTW, to remove it when it's wet, use paint thinner or turpentine. Once it cures, it's got to be razored or sanded off.

                I don't like to buy big bottles, because the stuff air-cures in the bottle, so if you don't use it up in a few months, it will have a hard, tough skin on top - which may leave bits in the glue after you break through it.

                I believe there's a version from Titebond, and maybe one from Elmer's. Look for the key word "Urethane", which may not be all that obvious on the label.

                One caution - the stuff contains unreacted organic isocyanates, which are known sensitizers. You can work with it for a long while and nothing will happen, and then one day a whiff of it will bring on what feels like a full-blown asthma attack. So you need excellent positive ventilation. (I'm sensitized myself, from working with urethanes for several years back in the 60s. It ain't fun.)

                Pete in NJ
                Pete in NJ

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Your Old Dog
                  Actually that's not correct. Some of the most expensive knives made in the world have glued on handles. You just have to be savvy enough to have something for it to grip such as threads (as in this case) or belling out the bottom of the hole. Has the added advantage of being removable if you put enough heat to it such as if a cane broke.

                  No need for elephant guns while only hunting canarys. The job does not have to withstand the rigors of outer space. I've used Acra Glass and agree it's a great product. Don't think I'd use it to put notes on the refrigerator though, scotch tape works just fine for that job.
                  I'm just concerned for the safety of the wee dram of high-grade spirits. I simply shudder at the thought of losing a drop of that precious cargo due the failure of an inadequate glue joint.
                  Ignorance is curable through education.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm realy intrested in how you held the balls to drill the hole in them.
                    The outside I imagine you did before cutting them off.
                    ...lew...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      DD, here is another approach not mentioned yet if you would still like to thread the wood. Thin some superglue and soak the end of the stick you want to thread, let it dry good, and then cut your threads as before. It should keep the wood from splintering . If it should start to splinter, stop soak it again before you thread any deeper.
                      James

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J. Randall
                        DD, here is another approach not mentioned yet if you would still like to thread the wood. Thin some superglue and soak the end of the stick you want to thread, let it dry good, and then cut your threads as before. It should keep the wood from splintering . If it should start to splinter, stop soak it again before you thread any deeper.
                        James
                        It would be neat if he could draw a vacuum on it and impregnate the wood with the glue. You're right, that would make a pretty neat way of threading the wood without the tearout.
                        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
                          I'm realy intrested in how you held the balls to drill the hole in them.
                          The outside I imagine you did before cutting them off.
                          ...lew...
                          I turned and bored the external and internal threads this way round. I used hex bar as it is the largest dia stock we had to get a decent sized ball



                          Then when all the 'ball' blanks were done I bored and threaded a smaller bar to suit the 24mm fine thread which will become a ferrule so I could screw in and cut the balls at the same time without disturbing the set up of the ball turning jig and get them all the same size





                          I've enjoyed it so far and it fills an otherwise dull lunchtime!

                          Al

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                          • #14
                            I use 2 part epoxy that is originally intended for fixing big holes in wooden frames for glueing all sorts of things.
                            It sticks to metal much better than Araldite and it is gap filling. No need for that here because you did a great job.

                            There is only one thing wrong with that cane. The flask it to tiny

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by interiorpainter
                              There is only one thing wrong with that cane. The flask it to tiny
                              There's the rub, I searched t'internet high and low and found only one supplier of glass products in the UK that had such a thing with threaded glass listed and who would sell me less than 50. The diameter dictates how deep I could drill so I couldn't get a longer tube and I didn't want the flask too fat or it would damage the proportion of the cane, which is styled on an RSM's style military one when finished.

                              Hopefully the recipients won't complain too much as the tube only holds about half a standard UK measure but it should be OK for making a slightly wobbly coffee.

                              More tinkering this afternoon so I'll see how it goes with suggestions so far.

                              Al

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