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  • cable release tapered threads

    The Canon A570 IS camera http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canona570is/ ($150 in USA) is recommended for digiscoping, by several members of the following forum: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=105290 . Digiscoping is the taking of photos through a spotting scope, using a small digital P&S camera attached (via an adapter) to the scope's eyepiece. As you can see on that link, very good results are obtained with this particular camera.

    I've ordered it, and will use it on my Pentax PF-65A II scope, with XW-14 eyepiece. This gives an eye view of 28X magnification. The image recorded by the camera is further magnified.

    P&S cameras do not have a cable release socket, nor a provision for a remote release. At these high magnifications it's essential to eliminate vibration, so a cable release is needed. The problem is, how to adapt one?

    Since this camera will be dedicated to this particular task, I'm considering gluing a small bridge over the camera's shutter button. I thought I'd then drill and tap a hole in the bridge to accommodate a shutter release.

    But as you can see here, standard shutter release threads are tapered. How can I make the female threads? What size are they?

    Last edited by aostling; 01-22-2008, 01:14 AM.
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    Allan, have a lok at this, it may give you a few ideas.

    For something a little more sturdy one could make a small U shaped bracket that mounts to the tripod socket and ends over top of the shutter release.
    Last edited by Willy; 01-22-2008, 02:45 AM.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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    • #3
      Willy,

      Thanks, this nut idea looks worth a try. I'll start scrounging around for a suitable size.

      http://www.srb-griturn.com/cable-rel...mera-859-p.asp shows a commercial device, but this seems too ungainly to me.

      [edit] The cable release screws into this 6-32 knurled nut. I don't think the thread pitches match (and, of course, the male thread is tapered) but it seems secure enough for this application.

      Last edited by aostling; 01-22-2008, 12:15 PM.
      Allan Ostling

      Phoenix, Arizona

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      • #4
        Allen -

        I knew I had the specs on the cable release threads, but it took me a few days to dig out the manual. If you still need them, send me your e-mail address and I'll get the file to you.

        Glenn

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        • #5
          who just bought the EOS Canon? Here's one for them.

          http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DN
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          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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          • #6
            I've sent this to Allan, but thought others might be interested. Here is a link to the specs for the cable release threads. Anyone want to volunteer to make a tap or die?

            http://s274.photobucket.com/albums/j...leaseLarge.jpg

            Glenn

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            • #7
              A hydraulic tracer attachment or taper attachment allows you to cut threads at an angle.

              A taper attachment will cut at a pure angle, the tracer will cut whatever bizarre contoured thread profile you can throw at it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Oldguy
                I've sent this to Allan, but thought others might be interested.
                I should mention to anybody interested that Glenn suggested an easy solution to the problem which I had not thought of: pirating a socket from any old throw-away camera.
                Last edited by aostling; 02-01-2008, 10:49 PM.
                Allan Ostling

                Phoenix, Arizona

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                • #9
                  I've cut tapered threads by chucking between centers with an offset tailstock. That's a fairly steep taper, but if you can make it a short enough piece you might be able to pull it off. It's probably in the category of just handcrank the spindle for four turns on a piece like that though.

                  Jan
                  .
                  "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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