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  • Milling Machine Info needed

    I would like to know how small milling Machine go----- I am thinking of getting one for my hobby engineering----- Some pic's and Info would be neet or Links to info--Thanks----

  • #2
    Get the biggest one you can manage and afford ..

    or you will be cursing your small milling machine ...a few days after you've bought it .

    Get a square column one rather than round .

    Dual vertical and horizontal is good.

    If it comes down to Asian ........buy Taiwanese .

    Must have common taper like R8, Morse or 30 international

    or you will be paying dear and hunting down tooling forever.

    Power-feed is not a must-have ...but is good

    Make sure your vertical head has a quill down-feed .

    If buying second hand have a look in the machine tool archive section under milling machines of this site below..(yup know it says UK ...but this is a global site)

    http://lathes.co.uk

    Also remember with second hand ...the tooling can cost as much as the machine ...so search out one with tooling included.



    all the best.markj

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    • #3
      This small


      are this is average
      Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
      http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
      http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

      Comment


      • #4
        Small mills

        1) Search through the archives on this site; lots of good info there.

        2) For very small machines, Sherline is good; see www.sherline.com

        3) Somewhat larger, look at Prazi/Wabeco.

        Square column is definitely the way to go.

        If buget is an issue, then Grizzly/Enco/other Chinese models can give you OK results. You may need to put work into improvement and reconditioning.

        You'll see recommendations for USA motors being preffered over Chinese.

        Hope this helps,

        Comment


        • #5
          [quote=tecnovist]I would like to know how small milling Machine go----- I am thinking of getting one for my hobby engineering----- Some pic's and Info would be neet or Links to info--Thanks----[/quote

          This is the smallest. I do not endorse this brand, just showing it as an example of the smallest size mill that will be suitable for milling and leave you loving the mill operation rather than hating it.
          Note the weight.
          Note the price........pg


          Comment


          • #6
            The smallest truly high quality milling machine may be the Rusnok (see http://www.campbelltools.com/rusnokmill.html ) but it is small, and expensive.

            As I've said previously, if I were in the market for a milling machine I'd look seriously at the JET JVM-836, but it's about 1500 pounds so if I had to move it down bulkhead stairs or something it might be a bit much. Machines can be disassembled for moving, however.
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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            • #7
              That Shop Fox write up says " Table Swivel 45* L R " .
              Is that realy right? I can't see any way to "swivel" the table .
              Can't see any real need to either, just makes another source of
              inaccuracy.
              ????
              ...lew...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
                That Shop Fox write up says " Table Swivel 45* L R " .
                Is that realy right? I can't see any way to "swivel" the table .
                Can't see any real need to either, just makes another source of
                inaccuracy.
                ????
                ...lew...
                That is what the Shop Fox says. I am not familar with this machine myself, but rather used it as an example of a mill that may do the job. Inaccurate? Most likely, But it has the needed mass for milling at 1900 lbs. And the price is cheap. (Think scrap in $ per pound)
                Beats a mill-drill though, and for very little more money, especially if you found such a machine used.
                I certainly do not recommend this brand under any circumstance either, just a cheap way to go at the accquire a mill problem for a new-bie.......pg

                edit note: I think the table swing thing may be saying the table will swivel like that on the fence of a wood jointer....i.e., the front edge moves up or down 45 degrees. I can see that, although it will not help make it a more accurate machine.
                Last edited by piniongear; 01-27-2008, 01:44 PM.

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                • #9
                  I bet it's the Head that swivels.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have an old clausing 8525, and while not a huge mill is plenty good for the things I do. Any larger and I would have no room at all in the garage.

                    They say it's a 'benchtop' mill, but you'd better have a massive bench.

                    I think most of the asian 6x26 mills are clones of it or some other very similar 'brother'

                    Prime disadvantage of the clausings are that they're old, so some will need some work to get them in shape.

                    But since the last asian machine I bought new needed work on the dovetails anyway, I would have saved a bit by purchasing an older one at lower cost and done the same work, so going with the new asian may not always be a real advantage.

                    ken.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by IOWOLF
                      I bet it's the Head that swivels.
                      Maybe, but it does say the table .....pg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Not counting Sherline-size machines, or modern mill-drills - about fifty years ago there was the Bench-Master, which could be set up as a vertical or horizontal mill. A Swiss machine, the Sixis, was a sort of a mini-Deckel at a very un-mini price. And Hardinge at one time had some small verticals in the BB series. These are what I think of when the subject of small mills comes up. They should all be covered on Tony G's site, lathes.co.uk. Their suitability as "hobby machines" depends a bit on what the hobby is. Parts for pocket watches? Parts for bridges?
                        Last edited by rantbot; 01-28-2008, 02:57 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Universal mill

                          Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
                          That Shop Fox write up says " Table Swivel 45* L R " .
                          Is that realy right? I can't see any way to "swivel" the table .
                          Can't see any real need to either, just makes another source of
                          inaccuracy.
                          ????
                          ...lew...
                          Lew,

                          that will be correct.

                          It is a "universal" mill that is needed for helical milling. The table is off-set left/right to suit the helix angle of the job being milled - spiral/helical gears etc.

                          It pivots on the cross-slide saddle - similar to the way a vertical mill head tilts left-right on the column slide.

                          To get best use out of it you will need a universal dividing head and a set of change gears.

                          The change gears are attached to the "X" slide lead-screw and are mounted similar to the gear-train that drives the lead-screw or QC gear-box on a lathe. The train is connected to and drives the worm spindle on the universal dividing head.

                          The dividing head is made to turn/rotate as the "X" feed lead-screw is turned and the table advances.

                          I will cover that in the next few days when I post a new lot of pics on gear and spiral milling.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you look closely at the picture you can see the saddle is two pieces.

                            Kinda silly really... To do all that you could do on a universal mill that has this feature requires all the matching power feeds, linkages, gearboxes, rotary head, and tailstock. Not going to fit all that on a 32" table.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All in

                              Yep.

                              Its all in there - the drive for the "X" lead-screw is as normal.

                              Same for stops etc.

                              Just loosen 4 bolts and adjust/pivot the table on the saddle/apron, re-tighten and away you go.

                              Just like on a universal cylindrical grinder or a taper-turning attachment.

                              These adverts aren't wrong either!

                              http://www.hareandforbes.com.au/samp...orking/23.html

                              [Edit]
                              This should calarify it somewhat.

                              [Edit]
                              Last edited by oldtiffie; 01-28-2008, 07:57 AM.

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