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H/F 4" Cross-slide vise, worth $29.99?

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  • #16
    Learning experience is the best way to look at it.

    I buy a LOT of HF stuff for project parts, or for the express purpose of modifying for another use. And, some things are ready to use as-is.

    I've looked at them in the store, and the only real drawback I've seen in that vise is that it needs more gib screws, and a tighter slide fit for the moveable jaw

    People will happily pay twice that, or more, for casting kits for milling vises, and still need to come up with the rest of the parts, this is a complete kit that's ready for final fitting.

    Ken.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by kendall
      Learning experience is the best way to look at it.

      I buy a LOT of HF stuff for project parts, or for the express purpose of modifying for another use. And, some things are ready to use as-is.
      i love when i buy stuff there and they ask me if i want the extended warranty. i tell them that what i'm going to do with it as soon as i get it home will void the warranty anyway.

      andy b.
      The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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      • #18
        I've had a 5" one on the drill press for years. It is fine for this purpose provided you remember to lock the slides before starting to drill. HOWEVER, on mine the two slides are not exactly at right angles to each other, which might cause difficulties with precision work, so it might be worth checking this.

        franco

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        • #19
          We have a new HF here in Bellevue, WA where I live so I dropped in Saturday to see what a new store looked like. The look like all the rest as it turns out

          Anyway I looked at the vise and see that it is the same model I bought at Sears many years ago - or so close I cannot tell the difference. It has worked for me as a welding alignment tool, drill press vise, glue down weight, and sometimes it's put on my power hacksaw. It's an ok old clunker that is not useful for precision work but it sure takes abuse well.

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          • #20
            Nothing better to do so I'll throw in a couple pics of where I'm at on the cross-slide re-do.

            I made a bearing mount bracket from some scrap 1/2" alum. plate and bored it to fit the .375" x .875" bearing with a freshly sharpened brazed carbide b/bar. The finish is slick as button so fitting the CDCO diamond wheel on a H/F grinder works great!

            I'm finally learning to measure twice, double check the math and go real slow using the boring bar. The bearing pressed in really nice, no Loctite needed for a change.

            I used the original steel plate to retain the bearing but it was cupped .025". so had to surface it flat on the disc sander and a sheet of wet/dry paper on a glass plate.



            After milling the bearing mount end of the casting square to the top surface, it fit together well and spins very smoothly now. With the leadscrew friction dramatically reduced, the gib adjustments could then be snugged down and it operates with no binding at all. One axis down, one to go.



            It ain't fully polished yet, but the t*rd is at least semi-glossy now.
            Milton

            "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

            "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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            • #21
              Looks good!
              Should have it shining soon!

              Ken.

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