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  • graphite lubrication

    I've been using this stuff,

    http://www.tool-net.co.uk/p-316744/c...ng-powder.html

    for certain jobs, yankee screwdriver, locks, etc just wondered where I shouldn't be using it ?


    I know it wouldn't be any good on stuff that had oil on / near

    Thoughts?

    Lee
    I no longer own tools I had.

  • #2
    If, memory serves me correctly, Graphite conducts electricity. May not want to use it around electrical switches or near a white carpet

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    • #3
      Not sure where yo got the info on not near oil as in the past colloidal graphite was used in an oil base as a running in lubricant.
      The lock stuff you have there is a lot coarser and is the best lubricant for locks etc where the use of oil will attract dust and will eventually clog the innards
      On my locks I just scrape an hb pencil lead and put on key and insert in lock usually lasts for some months so tahnks for the web site I will order some to save the mess from a pencil!!
      Peter
      I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by huntinguy
        If, memory serves me correctly, Graphite conducts electricity. May not want to use it around electrical switches or near a white carpet
        Our workfloor is lighted by 400 watt metal halide high bay fixtures and those bulbs run HOT. We were having a problem with the bulbs siezing in the fixture sockets due to the heat. The glass envelope would sometimes break from the force necessary to remove a burned out lamp. The manufacturer (Phillips) recommended floating a layer of powdered graphite on water in a coffee can, dipping the base of the bulb in to coat the threads and then installing in the fixture. It seemed to work fine. We never had a problem with the graphite being conductive although we did have a problem with the mess. Eventually we switched to using a ceramic based anti-sieze lubricant.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Frank K
          Our workfloor is lighted by 400 watt metal halide high bay fixtures and those bulbs run HOT. We were having a problem with the bulbs siezing in the fixture sockets due to the heat.

          I was taught with edison screw fittings to tighten them just by hand so they were snug then back 1/8 of a turn.

          Lee
          I no longer own tools I had.

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          • #6
            Graphite is conductive, but it takes a significant layer and a short distance between conductors to cause any problems. I think the most significant problem using it around wiring is the potential (sic) for shock by having a live wire conduct juice through a graphite layer to an ungrounded metal case- things like that. You could smear it all over the back of a switch and all around the contacts, or around the base of a light bulb, without causing a problem- not that anyone should deliberately do that. In the case of the lightbulb, it's probably a good idea to wipe the threads with it for easier removal later. That part of a socket that accepts the screw-in base is supposed to be neutral anyway- but I wouldn't count on that for safety in any event.

            I'd be interested to see what kind of conduction a graphite filled grease would give- that would represent a bulk more than a thin layer. That could possibly be significant.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              I wouldn't use it near a white dress shirt. but we would use it at work mixed with oil and then put on the gaskets for our boiler flanges so they could be removed in the future
              Ed
              Agua Dulce, So.California
              1950 F1 street rod
              1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
              1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
              1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
              1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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              • #8
                I have a tube of graphite grease for dead centers that I use for some things but never in locks.
                It's only ink and paper

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                • #9
                  I use a graphite-in-isopropanol solution as an indicator fluid for fitting parts and recievers to stocks. I paint the parts, fit them, and look for the rubbed off spots to be high spots.

                  The fluid is used in Navy Nuclear work as an approved lubricant in reactor areas, don't spill on your clothes!

                  Steve

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