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  • Annodizing!

    I have finnaly successfully anodized some alum cable ferrules!!!!!!!!!

    anybody tried the steaming method of sealing? or do i need to get that nickel stuff?

  • #2
    any photo's laddie we all want to see your work. Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #3
      Hi Lightswitch,
      Although I never did any anodizing, I use to have an aluminum jewelery business that produced and sold jewelery in 22 fashion colors.
      I found( not invented) a way to seperate the anodizing and dying process.
      I would have the peices racked and taken to the anodizer, clear anodized then I would bring them back to my shop reactivate the anodic coating and dye them.
      Congradulations on doing the hard part yourself.
      The anodic coating will seal when left out in air or steam sealed or boiled, but it did not seem to hold up as well as when sealed in a sealing solution. This was not a scientific test, just people wearing the jewelry.
      I do have a 5 gallon bucket of Sandoz sealing salt, as well as several pounds each of 14 colors left.
      If you would like any of this I will be glad to send some, just pay shipping.


      ------------------

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      • #4
        Funny thing

        The sun bleached out some parts I had anodized in two days (Steam sealed). Not very good.

        I have saw on two sites light bulbs in series with parts to tell when they lose connection. Any ideals what kind of bulbs to use? As the anodize builds up the bulb becomes dimmer. (less current?)

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        • #5
          I do a lot of anodizing. Steam sealing works just fine. I usually boil my parts in de-ionized water for about 45 minutes. Don't let the water level drop to the level of the parts or they will be marked. For dye, I just use plain old Rit fabric dye and am able to get a very good black. You can also use ink jet ink. You have to mix it at the rate of about two packages to two or three litres of water and should heat it to about 40 (120f) degrees before you put the parts in. Don't heat any more than that or the dye bath will start the sealing before enough dye is taken up. The two biggest problems I run into are getting the parts clean enough and maintaining a good connection. I have a couple of parts in the dye bath right now and this is the second trip through the process for them. I didn't get one clean and the anodizing failed. Back into the lye bath to strip them. The best way to de-grease is to use oven cleaner.

          Using a light bulb is a good idea! I will have to do that. I think a tail light bulb should work well for small parts and a 50 watt headlight should be fine for larger bits.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Example of anodizing:
            This is a double arm drive I built last year for astronomy use. If interested see my pages at http://vts.bc.ca/astrophoto

            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Very impressive pictures! Difficult subjects to photograph, they won't hold still for the camera.

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              • #8
                Thank you Joel. Astronomy is a hobby that fits well with machining as there are all sorts of nice projects that one can build that simply cannot be purchased.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Reviewing the David Laplantz book..

                  The anodizing is like a stack of straws, the dye you want in the deep holes, the sealer you want to plug the ends of the holes like mud in a musket barrel. Nice book, I forgot I had. (found it by accident) He speaks of checking the ph on dyes. Says to only use distilled or ionized water. Fine to use tap water for rinses thou. I think the wool acid type dyes are what are the best, the rit dyes are a alkaline base, like a salt.
                  I was hoping he spoke of the light bulbs.
                  One thing he explained that helped me, sharp edges do not build up layers of thickness. it has a notch like the corner, you have to file or grind a radius to have anodized layer on the edges. He said knitting needles make good hangers.. put the tapered end into the small parts holes.

                  Good book, another crackpot artist thou.

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                  • #10
                    Evan
                    Very nice. Does it work as good as it looks?

                    [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 06-03-2003).]

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                    • #11
                      Thrud,

                      If you follow the link I posted with the picture you can read my analysis of the performance. In short, yes, it works. I have extended the recognized magnitude recording capability of a 50 mm lens by three orders of magnitude beyond what is normally accepted as possible. This is because the double arm drive is so accurate that all of the photons (of a particular spot of light) fall on the same silver iodide crystal. I did not invent the drive but am the first person to implement it to a level of mechanical accuracy that exceeds the theoretical capability of the concept (according to the inventor, Dave Trott). The design is mine.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Evan, I thought you said astronomy was a hobby?
                        I know how difficult it is to do astro photography, yours is more impressive now that I know what you had to do to get there!

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                        • #13
                          Joel,

                          Ok, maybe it's an obsession. Here is a photo of my latest project which you may have seen on my web pages. This is looking down the barrel of my new six inch telescope. Since this was taken I have anodized most of the parts black. To get a nice matte non-reflective finish I sand blast the parts first with fine river sand. It works very well. After anodizing the sand blasted parts you need to rub the part with lanolin and then wash it with some dish soap. This really brings out the black.

                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14

                            A lil heater for my anodizing tanks (5 gallon buckets) You just lower it to the level and clamp it to the bucket, plug it in..

                            I know.. but it is on a GFCI circuit.. but..

                            I know.. I have lived a long time, and should know better.. but it boils the 5 gallons of dye in a few minutes and cost a whole 8 dollars.. Works great, but be careful..

                            it is a 120 water heater element tack welded to a piece of angle.. Works great..

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                            • #15
                              Even
                              Nice sight. I was impressed by the red Aurora shot - beauty! If you ever want to really shoot the Aurora you have to go north of Great Bear Lake. Nice and black up there, and you can read very well with the Aurora it is so bright you can almost reach up and touch it...

                              The photos with the Nikon are very surprising. I did not think these cameras would work so well for astrophotography. Thank you for the information!

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