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Wood-burning stove from 250-galon propane tank. Pics!!

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  • Wood-burning stove from 250-galon propane tank. Pics!!

    Well, the stove is off to a good start. Here's some in-progress pictures.

    The flue adapter is welded to the top with one inch sticking into the tank to prevent stuff from running down the wall.


    The inside of the tank.


    The smokeshelf will be suspended from the two pieces of 1/4x2 flat bar to eliminate any obstructions inside the firebox and to eliminate the need to climb inside the tank to weld it in place. The bars are at an angle so the smokeshelf will slope toward the back of the stove.


    One of the pieces of flat bar was left long enough to extend through the flue adapter, so I can easily pull it into position.
    Last edited by winchman; 02-06-2008, 07:13 PM.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    The longer piece of flat bar will be trimmed before the smokeshelf is put into position.


    The flat bars are pushed back far enough to make room for the flue before being welded in place.


    Using a long bar clamp to get the setback even.


    The calibrated nut provides the setback.
    Last edited by winchman; 02-06-2008, 06:42 PM.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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    • #3
      Oh, well. That's why I made this the back of the stove.


      I've still got the legs to add, and then the door and dampers. The bottom will be lined with firebrick, and firebricks will also be used as a grate.

      Roger
      Last edited by winchman; 02-06-2008, 06:44 PM.
      Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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      • #4
        Nice welds. I am looking forward to seeing the finished stove. Keep the pics comming

        Rob

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        • #5
          Damn nice looking job so far. Your friends gonna be pleased with it.

          Are you going to do the door so you can put some of that fireplace rope/gasket material into it to make it air tight?

          Mine had a square hole cut for the door. Then the guy took a 1" wide strip, put it inside the doorway frame and slid it over so that you could see about 1/2 - 5/8 inch of it and welded it up. He did that all around the door. Then he had that recessed tab to glue (fireplace cement) the rope gasket material. When the door was closed and locked down on the gasket material it was air tight. The only air that got in the stove was what I left in by opening up some sliding holes near the ash box. If you ain't got it worked out as to what you want to do let me know and I'll do a sketch of it and scan it in and send it to you.
          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

          Comment


          • #6
            YOD, I'd appreciate that. I'm was planning to make the door 18" by 18" with a rim of 1/8x1 flat bar to lap the gap and form a seal (of sorts). We've done that on the smokers and grills we've made at the school. What you describe sounds like it might work better for this project.

            I'd also appreciate some ideas for the dampers. I was thinking about cutting some 2" by 4" openings and weld a short piece of 1/2" pipe at either side. The movable part of the damper would be a 5" by 7" piece of the unused portion of the tank with two rods welded on to fit through the pipes. A piece of flat bar across the outer ends of the rods would serve as a handle and stop. The idea is for the overlap to prevent pieces from shooting out in a straight line if the wood pops as it burns.

            The stove is going in a barn/workshop, so I don't think it needs to be absolutely airtight. I do want it tight enough to keep the fire under control, though.

            Roger
            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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            • #7
              Hi buddy..

              We used to make dampers for home made stove from a round piece of pipe, a cross bar welded in with a "bolt" welded on.. the actual damper had a nut in the middle, you'd screw the damper in and out to adjust air.

              I made a couple that looked like pigs, the damper was the nose.

              The firebrick, the way you install it, it is soft and dropping the wood in wears it out quickly.
              I saw a cast iron shaker grate somewhere on sale. Possibly Harbor Freight? I've made them from large rebar too.

              Castable refractory, get it from a boiler repair place, or look up insulators.. It pours in just like concrete. I mix it kinda dry thou and tamp it. It'll crack if you mix it too wet.. even cracked it is better than firebrick. If you was closer, I have some bags of Perilite you could mix in. Enough to cast the stove, you can buy it from a place like budget foundry supply (or was it budget casting supply?) , pay $25 a bag and $35 shipping or locally for $15 a bag from the boiler rebuild place. You can also cast a cupola the same way as your stove. Make a loop inside from sheetmetal or a rubbermaid garbage can if you like.. I made them from Cardboard and let them burn out once. Pack it tight so it does not collapse. Three bags should be plenty. About a inch and half on the walls and you could cast aluminum out of it.

              Only other thing possibly I'd add.. a propane burner.. I hate lighting stoves. if you added a propane jet, stack wood, light jet, jet lights stove, turn off jet. Weed burners are $18 at HF Also.
              Last edited by Dawai; 02-07-2008, 05:45 AM.
              Excuse me, I farted.

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              • #8
                Nice looking job. I have a question.....what's a smokeshelf and what does it do?
                Thanks,
                John R

                Comment


                • #9
                  John R, a smoke shelf is just a plate to retard the speed at which the smoke and heat exit the furnace through the chiminey. It confuses the heat, the heat hangs around a little longer and you get more heat saturation to the metal furnace. This all means the chimney could run a little cooler. It also could.....to a point.... insulate any hot dripping cresote from the chimney into the fire.

                  David, My stoves both had the heavy firebrick they sell at Tractor Service Supply. They take a real pounding with no problems but they wouldn't be as good to use if you wanted to build heat as in a smelter. (IMHO ) To light my fires I used to use a 1/8 metal 1" x5" trough I made up filled with keroseen. I carefully put two logs in, spaced them so that the walls were vertical and about 1" apart. I then capped off the top of those logs with a third log. This formed an oven of sorts. It worked absolutly every time. (keroseen lights very slowy, not at all like gas ) It burns about the same as charcol lighter fluid. In the house we use fire starter cubes and they work every time. One 16$ box last all winter. I also made a coal rake/fork of sorts so I can bring up the larger chunks out of the ash. These stay hot for nearly 24 hours after the fire goes out and will start a fresh fire for you day to day without need for fire starter cubes.

                  Roger, I'll try to work up a cross-sectional view and scan it in for you. We have a LOPI woodstove here in the house. It has a 1/16 metal jacket welded around the ourside and this makes it nearly a zero clearance installation. We have curtains about 16" away with no fear. The stove has a blower that blows the jacketed air out the front. If the shop this is going into is large you might want to consider doing the same. It allows you to move a huge amount of heat off the furnace in a hurry and also to direct it where you want it. The jacket on our furnace is about 1" from the main body.

                  My old shop furnace had a heavy duty grate so my air supply came in through the ash drawer. The face of the drawer had a row of 1/2" holes drilled in it and then I made up a 1/8 x 1 1/4 strip to slide back and forth and reveal or hide more air holes. On a round door it won't be possible but I sure like the sound of David's idea. You will likely put a chimney damper in also to keep the fire from running away. If it can't breath in or out you got total control, that's the simple point of having no leaks.
                  Last edited by Your Old Dog; 02-07-2008, 06:46 AM.
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yeah, David's suggestion is a winner.

                    Any ideas on how much damper area I should have? We've got all sizes of pipe available. Maybe one 3" on each side several inches away from the door and 2" above the firebrick? The tank is 30" in diameter, and the stove is about 48" to the top of the tank.

                    The fellow has already bought the firebrick, so I'm going to go ahead with that.

                    Roger
                    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Looks good so far Roger. Spin on dampers are the easiest to make and work well. They don't get too hot to touch because there is always some cool air going in through them. A Couple of 4" iron pipe caps are perfect with a 1/2" coarse thread nut welded to a cross plate to fit a piece of all thread sticking out from a hole in the stove door.

                      Order of assembly matters. Weld nut to cross bar that will go inside cap. Thread in the end of the all thread and peen it so the damper cap won't spin off in use. Then weld the cross strap just inside the pipe cap. Then weld the other end of the all thread to the center support in the hole in the door making sure that when it is spun shut it is a close fit at the perimeter of the hole.

                      Here is pic from my upstairs fireplace insert. These have the problem of spinning off in use if you give them too much of a spin to open them. When you assemble them put some aluminum Nevr-seize on the threads and they will be good for many years.

                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by winchman
                        Yeah, David's suggestion is a winner.

                        Any ideas on how much damper area I should have? We've got all sizes of pipe available. Maybe one 3" on each side several inches away from the door and 2" above the firebrick? The tank is 30" in diameter, and the stove is about 48" to the top of the tank.

                        The fellow has already bought the firebrick, so I'm going to go ahead with that.

                        Roger
                        It won't take a lot of air hole area to fuel the fire. I had maybe 10 1/2 inch holes and in normal operation had it closed off all but 3-4. I must say I much prefer David/Evan's setup better. I would just go with one input. This should cause the air to enter with some velocity which could only help the fire. If you make it too large you loose the rush of air advantage. (when I open the door on my LOPI in the house there is a tremendous rush of air as the seal cracks open)

                        Hope he aint going to firebrick the entire furnace as it ain't necessary. Just where the ashes will lay and draw dampness that would rust the unit. In other words, the floor and 1 course of bricks on the sides. If you do the entire stove you'd be makinga blast furnace and get little heat from it!!

                        Shoot me a PM with your email address and I'll email you the drawing I made. It's crude but might supply you with more options.
                        Last edited by Your Old Dog; 02-07-2008, 08:57 AM.
                        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Evan, thanks for the picture. That really helps.

                          YOD, your private message box appears to be full, and it won't take any more.

                          The firebrick will only be on the bottom.

                          I just finished using the plasma to cut out the door, and I put the legs on earlier this morning. Pics later. Moving right along.

                          Roger
                          Last edited by winchman; 02-08-2008, 09:02 AM.
                          Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                          • #14
                            More pics from this morning.

                            Getting ready to put the legs on.


                            I used the plasma torch to cut out the door.


                            The legs are welded on.


                            Inside view showing the suspended smokeshelf.


                            Roger
                            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                            • #15
                              Here's the bodies for the dampers I made from 3" pipe and 1/2" bolts.


                              Roger
                              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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