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small strong magnets put to shop use.

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  • #16
    Now I'm confused- Van der Waals sounds dutch, not scotch-
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #17
      Originally posted by BobWarfield
      This works for dogs too, I might add.

      BW
      Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of dog it's too dark to read. - Mark Twain
      .
      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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      • #18
        That's actually a Groucho Marx quote, I believe.

        Still good.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Doc Nickel
          That's actually a Groucho Marx quote, I believe.

          Still good.

          Doc.

          Yes - a Groucho Marx quote ... he's full of 'em

          Some of my favorites

          A black cat crossing your path signifies that the animal is going somewhere.

          A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five.

          I find television very educational. Every time someone switches it on I go into another room and read a good book.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Fasttrack
            magnetism is no match for van der waals forces?

            Evan was referring to the forces between molecules, AKA chemical forces. Adhesives or glues come into very intimate contact with the substances they join and hence these molecular forces are at play in forming the bond.

            They are named after the Dutch physicist J. D. van der Waals.

            If you want more, Google "Van der Waals force".

            I also use duct or duck tape to remove swarf from magnets. I keep several in the bottom of my container of Tap Magic and they collect the magnetic swarf that the brush deposits there. The duct tape seems to work best for this.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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            • #21
              Paul has it right. Here is a pretty good explanation.

              http://www.chemguide.co.uk/atoms/bonding/vdw.html

              I should point out this is not what holds matter together but it is in large part what make things tend to stick together. That includes in large part the wringing effect of Johansson blocks and is how a gecko lizard is able to walk on a wall or even a window.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #22
                Favorite Groucho "quote"

                Sir, you are close to an idiot!

                Groucho: Well I better step away ....

                SP

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                • #23
                  I've never bought from this outfit, but if I ever get around to ordering some, it would most likely be this place:
                  http://wondermagnet.com/main.shtml

                  Here is an interesting magnet site:
                  http://www.rare-earth-magnets.com/ma...university.htm

                  Another:
                  http://www.forcefieldmagnets.com/cat...roducts_id=102

                  Orrin
                  So many projects. So little time.

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                  • #24
                    Magnet source

                    Try American Science and Surplus - formerly "Jerryco" - for magnets. Only problem is, this place IS a "surplus" dealer, and you may not find the same things in stock from one month to another. www.sciplus.com/

                    Pete Heinlein, NJ
                    Pete in NJ

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                    • #25
                      OK, so, a few minutes ago I was gluing such a magnet to something and it didn't stick. So I took it into the next shop to grind off the nickel plate with the bench sander. I flipped on the sander and held the magnet to the paper with my fingertips. That didn't work out too well as the platen under the belt is steel. The magnet instantly stuck to the platen except it had a fast moving belt between. The magnet was then catapulted across the grinding shop and I heard it bounce off the wall. That was all for what seemed like two or three seconds and then I heard a very distinct and sharp !CLACK!. No rattle, no roll. It's somewhere in that room. There is a lot of metal in that room. It's almost like it was hovering around deciding what to stick to. I didn't bother looking for it. All I know is that it is still in the room somewhere.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #26
                        Think twice about grinding or otherwise removing the plating on magnets. The plated ones are usually neodymium and the plating is there to prevent corrosion. The neo- oxidizes and turns into a white powder and looses it's magnetism.

                        Even plated ones, if poorly plated, can corrode.
                        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                        • #27
                          And if the nickel plating is breached the magnets crumble.

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                          • #28
                            I've never had either result happen. If you want to glue them you need to rough up the surface. There are about six of the 1/2" supermagnets glued to the back frame of my mill. They hold the 50 lb counterweight in it's track so it doesn't rattle or vibrate. They don't quite touch the steel can that holds the lead so they are frictionless. They are still there and haven't corroded or crumbled.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #29
                              On of my local surplus stores carries Neodymium Magnets. I use them for everything. Got 'em on every machine tool, and on the walls to hold up charts, lists and prints. I glue them to metal surfaces using two part epoxy. As stipulated above, this requires the surface be roughed up. But you wanna talk about permanent magnets!
                              I also use Magnets harvested from the insides of my old hard drives. They're REALLY cheap! When I'm forced to buy them, I drive home with the paper bag stuck to the top of my car's roof.

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                              • #30
                                Hi,
                                I bought some real killer ones for a magnetic coupler on an under water motor.

                                Be careful they will erase your credit card stripes and magnatize your tools so they pick up swarf!!!
                                PaulF

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